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Ruth W Messinger

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NEWS
September 10, 1997 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning surprise in the New York City Democratic primary, the Rev. Al Sharpton apparently forced the front-runner, Manhattan Borough President Ruth W. Messinger, into a runoff for the right to oppose Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani in November. Messinger finished first in the primary but failed by a single point to gain the necessary 40% of the vote to gain the nomination. With all precincts reporting, Messinger had 39%, Sharpton 32% and Brooklyn City Councilman Sal F. Albanese 21%.
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NEWS
September 10, 1997 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a stunning surprise in the New York City Democratic primary, the Rev. Al Sharpton apparently forced the front-runner, Manhattan Borough President Ruth W. Messinger, into a runoff for the right to oppose Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani in November. Messinger finished first in the primary but failed by a single point to gain the necessary 40% of the vote to gain the nomination. With all precincts reporting, Messinger had 39%, Sharpton 32% and Brooklyn City Councilman Sal F. Albanese 21%.
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NEWS
January 2, 1998 | From Reuters
Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, sworn in for a second term Thursday, outlined plans to crack down on drug sales, hire more police and cut taxes.
NEWS
September 10, 1997 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Democrats voted in a low-turnout primary Tuesday to pick a candidate to oppose New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani, who polls show to be a strong favorite to win a second term. Manhattan Borough President Ruth W. Messinger was the front-runner, but she had to win 40% of the vote over two main opponents--Brooklyn City Councilman Sal F. Albanese and the Rev. Al Sharpton--to avoid a runoff later this month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 12, 1992 | From Religious News Service
Religious and political leaders who have championed saving a colonial-era cemetery, widely regarded as one of the nation's most significant archeological sites for blacks, say the most compelling reason to preserve it is religious. Activists seeking to halt construction of a 34-story office tower at the 18th-Century site in lower Manhattan want the cemetery to be designated as both a city and a national landmark. They say the 400 burials and 1 million artifacts excavated so far are providing valuable information about African-American history, which had its beginnings in the church.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 1999 | Pamela Davega Carr
LECTURE AND FESTIVAL: Skirball Cultural Center will hold two weekend events. Tom Freudenheim, of the Judisches Museum in Berlin, will lecture on "The Jews of Berlin: Yesterday and Today" at 2 p.m. today. A Hanukkah festival with live music, sing-alongs, storytelling and art projects will be held from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday. Both events are $8; members and children 12 and younger are free. The center is at 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd., Sepulveda Pass. Information and reservations: (323) 655-8587.
NEWS
September 18, 1997 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Never mind. More than a week after the Democratic mayoral primary, as the candidates who finished first and second were busy campaigning against each other, the New York City Board of Elections ruled late Wednesday that the runoff wasn't necessary. Absentee ballots and a recount of voting machines allowed Manhattan Borough President Ruth W. Messinger to limp across the 40% threshold necessary to win the Democratic nomination over the Rev. Al Sharpton. She will oppose Mayor Rudolph W.
NEWS
September 24, 1997 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The money came from varied sources, all of it from the heart--checking accounts, wallets, piggy banks--as parents and pupils in Manhattan's affluent Greenwich Village scrambled to raise the $46,000 salary of a beloved fourth-grade public schoolteacher about to be cut from the staff. The money was collected in only four days.
NEWS
September 26, 1997 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the relief of admiring parents who had raised $46,000 to pay her salary, Lauren Zangara will teach their fourth-graders at PS 41 in Manhattan's Greenwich Village after all. Not only that, Zangara's supporters will get their money back after a decision by Schools Chancellor Rudy Crew on Thursday that symbolically sent the head of a local school district to stand in a corner. Crew ordered Supt.
NEWS
November 3, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton hit the campaign trail Sunday to lend some of his popularity to underdog Democrats in New York and New Jersey, telling local voters that the success of his agenda depends on their decisions at the polls Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1998 | TED ROHRLICH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a display of bicoastal open-mindedness unusual in a city that styles itself Not Yet New York, Los Angeles officials have reached eastward for advice on how to draft a new blueprint for local government. Ruth W.
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