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Ruth Washington

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruth Washington, publisher of the Los Angeles Sentinel, once the second-largest black newspaper in the United States, died Friday of cancer. She was 76. Mrs. Washington, who 16 years ago succeeded her husband as publisher, died in the Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital Chalet after a long hospitalization. "Although we were aware that Mrs. Washington was gravely ill, her death has still left us all in the state of shock and grief," Sentinel Chief Executive Officer Kenneth Thomas said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1990 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ruth Washington, publisher of the Los Angeles Sentinel, once the second-largest black newspaper in the United States, died Friday of cancer. She was 76. Mrs. Washington, who 16 years ago succeeded her husband as publisher, died in the Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital Chalet after a long hospitalization. "Although we were aware that Mrs. Washington was gravely ill, her death has still left us all in the state of shock and grief," Sentinel Chief Executive Officer Kenneth Thomas said.
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NEWS
January 21, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Ruth Washington, the newly appointed ambassador to Gambia, was killed in an auto accident involving a drunk driver, police in Greenburgh, N.Y., said. Washington, 67, was killed when a car crossed the center line and struck her car head-on, said Sgt. Robert Brown. The other driver was hospitalized in critical condition.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Ruth Washington, the newly appointed ambassador to Gambia, was killed in an auto accident involving a drunk driver, police in Greenburgh, N.Y., said. Washington, 67, was killed when a car crossed the center line and struck her car head-on, said Sgt. Robert Brown. The other driver was hospitalized in critical condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1987 | ROXANE ARNOLD, Times Staff Writer
Ending a long-running and bitter probate battle, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge ruled Friday that control of the Los Angeles Sentinel, once the second-largest black newspaper in America, was rightly willed to the widow of its founder, Leon Washington. Judge Ronald E. Swearinger's decision brings to a conclusion a 13-year fight over the future of the struggling weekly between Ruth Washington, now in her 70s, and the sister of her late husband and his illegitimate son.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 1990
The 1990 Kingdom Day Parade will be held Monday to commemorate the Jan. 15 birthday of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard will be closed to traffic and parking. Parade will begin at 11 a.m. Starting point is at Crenshaw and Martin Luther King Jr. boulevards. Reviewing stand for judges will be at Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. near McClung Drive. Termination point will be at the Los Angeles Coliseum at Menlo and 39th streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1986 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
It began with an adulterous love affair nearly four decades ago when Leon Washington Jr., the gregarious publisher of Los Angeles' only black newspaper, cast his eye on a young bookkeeper who worked in the office, a woman who eventually bore his son. The bookkeeper moved north and married. Ruth Washington stepped in to help her husband run the newspaper, and became a matriarch of black society in Los Angeles.
BOOKS
February 7, 1993 | Stanley O. Williford
This book is as much a paean to Central Avenue in the '30s, '40s and '50s as to black music and the many heralded and unheralded black musicians and entertainers. Author Tom Reed writes: "Central Avenue, the street of dreams, the hub, smoke-filled rooms, after-hours joints, jazz and blues, the gathering place of the black bourgeoisie, dance halls, theaters, nite clubs, filled with women, illegal booze, service personnel and illegal gambling." A former disc jockey, Reed gathered and collated hundreds of publicity stills, posters, fliers, ads and clippings from various collections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2001 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crispus Attucks "Chris" Wright, the son of a former slave who became an influential Beverly Hills civil rights lawyer, businessman and major benefactor to USC Law School, has died. He was 87. Wright, who was named an honorary USC trustee a year ago, died Dec. 4 of natural causes in the Los Angeles home he built half a century ago.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | BILL HIGGINS
To be 50 and still growing is a good sign for any organization. Sometimes it's too good. The California Committee of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund is expanding so rapidly it turned away more than 200 requests for tickets to its Black Women of Achievement Awards Luncheon on Thursday. "It's growing by leaps and bounds," said chairwoman Karen Shaw, "but that's money we're turning away. Next year we've definitely got to seek a larger room."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 1987 | ROXANE ARNOLD, Times Staff Writer
Ending a long-running and bitter probate battle, a Los Angeles Superior Court judge ruled Friday that control of the Los Angeles Sentinel, once the second-largest black newspaper in America, was rightly willed to the widow of its founder, Leon Washington. Judge Ronald E. Swearinger's decision brings to a conclusion a 13-year fight over the future of the struggling weekly between Ruth Washington, now in her 70s, and the sister of her late husband and his illegitimate son.
NEWS
January 28, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES and GINGER THOMPSON, Times Staff Writers
Marcine Shaw was 14 when she left behind the rural poverty of Beaumont, Tex., for the projects of South-Central Los Angeles. It was February, 1946, and she and her mother gave up their backwoods home for a unit in the Pueblo del Rio housing development at 55th Street and Holmes Avenue. There was no shame in being a poor black woman in a segregated housing project; Dr. H. Claude Hudson told her so. "Leaders like him helped us keep our self-esteem, our dignity.
NEWS
August 24, 1986 | United Press International
Nineteen suspects were arraigned before a U.S. magistrate Saturday on charges stemming from a massive citywide drug sweep that netted heroin worth $70 million, and a 20th suspect was arrested when she arrived to view the proceedings. Police searched for 10 other suspects in the third-largest seizure of heroin in New York City history. An arsenal of weapons also was confiscated in Friday's sweep of 14 locations around the city.
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