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Ruth Webb

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
As a talent agent, Ruth Webb earned a reputation in the 1970s for giving new life to such old stars as Ginger Rogers, Dorothy Lamour and Donald O'Connor on the dinner-theater circuit. She also helped rekindle Mickey Rooney's career, prompting him to write in a 1980 ad in Variety while appearing in the Broadway hit "Sugar Babies" that Webb "took me when no one else wanted me and made me a star."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
As a talent agent, Ruth Webb earned a reputation in the 1970s for giving new life to such old stars as Ginger Rogers, Dorothy Lamour and Donald O'Connor on the dinner-theater circuit. She also helped rekindle Mickey Rooney's career, prompting him to write in a 1980 ad in Variety while appearing in the Broadway hit "Sugar Babies" that Webb "took me when no one else wanted me and made me a star."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1994 | SANDRA TSING LOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joey Buttafuoco starring in comedies a la John Belushi? Tonya Harding wowing them in an Andrew Lloyd Webber musical? John Wayne Bobbitt--well, doing anything on camera except looking vaguely stunned? Watch out, Mike Ovitz. When it comes to never-say-never talent management, no one outstrips the Hollywood-based Ruth Webb Entertainment, Inc. "At first people thought I was kidding," cheerfully admits agent Sherri Spillane, who began Webb's new "scandal" division in June.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 1994 | SANDRA TSING LOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Joey Buttafuoco starring in comedies a la John Belushi? Tonya Harding wowing them in an Andrew Lloyd Webber musical? John Wayne Bobbitt--well, doing anything on camera except looking vaguely stunned? Watch out, Mike Ovitz. When it comes to never-say-never talent management, no one outstrips the Hollywood-based Ruth Webb Entertainment, Inc. "At first people thought I was kidding," cheerfully admits agent Sherri Spillane, who began Webb's new "scandal" division in June.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1988
In regard to Sullivan's comments about Mickey Rooney and me (see above), there are "people who need people," and who enjoy creative work and the fulfillment it gives to them both. The title can be "agent," "manager" or just a very good friend. I never thought show business was all about "us," but clients like Mickey Rooney, Shelley Berman, Dody Goodman, Martha Raye, Gene Barry and many others have given me tribute in full page ads and on television and in interviews. I am deeply appreciative.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987
I think The Times was way overboard in its lengthy tribute to Sue Mengers ("All About Sue," by Paul Rosenfield, Dec. 6). After all, Mengers had the benefit of a large, million-dollar agency behind her, paying the overhead and bringing in the clients. What about yours truly, who rescued Mickey Rooney from oblivion 17 years ago and who is responsible to this day for his success, and who also had the foresight to insist that Gene Barry be seen for "La Cage Aux Folles" . . . who had Yvonne DeCarlo written into "Follies" after she lost the role she went for. I have always paid my own way and owned my own company since I started, about the same time Sue started in New York . . . as a messenger girl.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1993
Regarding "The Clout Is in the Client and Other True Tales of Women Agents," by Elaine Dutka (July 4): I read most of the Calendar cover story about women agents. Was that really supposed to be fireworks? I am amazed that any writer could fill up so much space and say so little. I am a very well-established woman agent, as well as a former Broadway star. I turned agent in 1963 because I felt I had the knowledge and courage to be the best. This is much more than acquiring talent with clout, but in giving the clout to the client.
MAGAZINE
April 16, 2000 | Martin Booe
Of course you've led a respectable life. You'd clear any background check. But next time you mount your high horse when "Extra" starts slinging mud, take this into consideration: Would anybody put your wardrobe up for auction at a starting bid of five big ones?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1995 | EROL SARABI, Erol Sarabi is an actor who has appeared in films, television and on stage
The call is from a repeat customer. They want to see me again. I am filled with hesitation, excitement and nervous energy. What will they do with me this time? What will they want me to perform? Will I satisfy them and be asked to come back? I really need this job so I'll forgo any pride or fright I may have and do whatever I have to. This story is similar to Divine Marie Brown's (Stella Marie Thompson's) story, but the difference is I'm an actor and she's not.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1994 | SANDRA TSING LOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Memo to Hollywood: Yes, Tonya Harding can act. Granted, not everyone will care. Industry opinion has long been against the plucky skater from Oregon. Even through-the-roof name recognition and a mean triple-axel couldn't land her a spot in the post-Olympic "Ice Capades" tour. "Saturday Night Live" tapped rival Nancy Kerrigan, not Harding. That way too went the A-list endorsements: Revlon, Disney and Campbell's Soup.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1993
Regarding "The Clout Is in the Client and Other True Tales of Women Agents," by Elaine Dutka (July 4): I read most of the Calendar cover story about women agents. Was that really supposed to be fireworks? I am amazed that any writer could fill up so much space and say so little. I am a very well-established woman agent, as well as a former Broadway star. I turned agent in 1963 because I felt I had the knowledge and courage to be the best. This is much more than acquiring talent with clout, but in giving the clout to the client.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1988
In regard to Sullivan's comments about Mickey Rooney and me (see above), there are "people who need people," and who enjoy creative work and the fulfillment it gives to them both. The title can be "agent," "manager" or just a very good friend. I never thought show business was all about "us," but clients like Mickey Rooney, Shelley Berman, Dody Goodman, Martha Raye, Gene Barry and many others have given me tribute in full page ads and on television and in interviews. I am deeply appreciative.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 1987
I think The Times was way overboard in its lengthy tribute to Sue Mengers ("All About Sue," by Paul Rosenfield, Dec. 6). After all, Mengers had the benefit of a large, million-dollar agency behind her, paying the overhead and bringing in the clients. What about yours truly, who rescued Mickey Rooney from oblivion 17 years ago and who is responsible to this day for his success, and who also had the foresight to insist that Gene Barry be seen for "La Cage Aux Folles" . . . who had Yvonne DeCarlo written into "Follies" after she lost the role she went for. I have always paid my own way and owned my own company since I started, about the same time Sue started in New York . . . as a messenger girl.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1996 | Al Martinez
It was the kind of meeting made in Hollywood heaven: an agent, a private eye and the leggy ex-wife of a legendary mystery writer all coming together to talk about creating a television show based on scandal. I listened with disbelief as they told me how they'd lined up Tonya Harding, Joey Buttafuoco, Gennifer Flowers and Hugh Grant's good friend Divine Brown to be panelists on the show. There hasn't been such a gathering of intellectual colossi since the last meeting of Mensa.
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