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Ruth Weisberg

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December 23, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS, Times Staff Writer
If only Ruth Weisberg had gone into films--not as an actress, but as a power behind the camera, conjuring up poignant or sensuous moments with actors in a landscape and a battery of lights and lenses. But she chose instead to be a painter and printmaker, doggedly continuing for more than 20 years to offer up her passions and introspections in a conservative, rigidly programmatic style uncomfortably close to illustration.A selection of this work is on view through Jan. 8 at the Laguna Art Museum.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2007 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
"I learned early on that I was not going to be fashionable," says artist Ruth Weisberg. In the '60s, when she was in art school, fellow students were immersed in Pop and late Abstract Expressionism. She, however, was captivated by the elegant depiction of the human form and by the narrative painting of the Italian Renaissance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1985 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Times Staff Writer
Ruth Weisberg was in her 20s when she first saw her grandmother's "memorial" book. Turning page after page in the thick, black book about the Polish Jews who perished in the Holocaust, Weisberg could not believe what she was reading. And, recalls her mother, Theresa Weisberg, Ruth could not stop crying. Weisberg has continued crying for those lost Jews, sometimes in print but most often on canvas.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2003
Last Sunday's article featuring the current William Blake exhibition at the Huntington Library rightly notes Blake's enduring impact upon artists today ("He Set Imagination Free," Jan. 19). It should be noted that the Huntington illustrated that notion in dramatic form. In November 1999, for the first time in its history, the museum organized a solo exhibition of works by a contemporary painter. Los Angeles artist Ruth Weisberg was invited to create a body of work based upon any work of art in the Huntington's collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
"Shall I read you the verse?" artist Ruth Weisberg asks before explaining the genesis and evolution of her latest work, "Canto V: A Whirlwind of Lovers." And the ambitious project, which recently went on view in the Virginia Steele Scott Gallery at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens in San Marino, does require some explanation.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2003
Last Sunday's article featuring the current William Blake exhibition at the Huntington Library rightly notes Blake's enduring impact upon artists today ("He Set Imagination Free," Jan. 19). It should be noted that the Huntington illustrated that notion in dramatic form. In November 1999, for the first time in its history, the museum organized a solo exhibition of works by a contemporary painter. Los Angeles artist Ruth Weisberg was invited to create a body of work based upon any work of art in the Huntington's collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1997 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Veteran L.A. artist Ruth Weisberg was a Postmodernist before the term was coined. At the moment, the University of Judaism's Platt Gallery is presenting a sampling of some 20 of her large lithographs under the title "Drawing on a Life: Graphic Work by Ruth Weisberg." The earliest pieces are from the '70s. Back then, she looked a little old-fashioned. Now, she appears as a keeper of the flame for traditional figurative art, while informed by Expressionism, Surrealism and the temper of our times.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1988 | Cathy Curtis
If only Ruth Weisberg had chosen to go into films--not as an actress, but as a power behind the camera, conjuring up poignant or sensuous moments with actors in a landscape and a battery of lights and lenses. But the artist, who teaches at USC, chose instead to make paintings, drawings and prints--a selection of which is on view through Jan. 8 at the Laguna Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2007 | Scarlet Cheng, Special to The Times
"I learned early on that I was not going to be fashionable," says artist Ruth Weisberg. In the '60s, when she was in art school, fellow students were immersed in Pop and late Abstract Expressionism. She, however, was captivated by the elegant depiction of the human form and by the narrative painting of the Italian Renaissance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1993 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times.
Italy has been a continuous source of inspiration for artist Ruth Weisberg since she was an 18-year-old student at the Academia di Belle Arti in Perugia many years ago. Last year at this time, she was ensconced in a studio on the top floor of the American Academy in Rome, in the middle of a five-month stay made possible by a Fulbright Scholarship and a Visiting Artist Residency at the academy.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1999 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
"Shall I read you the verse?" artist Ruth Weisberg asks before explaining the genesis and evolution of her latest work, "Canto V: A Whirlwind of Lovers." And the ambitious project, which recently went on view in the Virginia Steele Scott Gallery at the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens in San Marino, does require some explanation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 1997 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Veteran L.A. artist Ruth Weisberg was a Postmodernist before the term was coined. At the moment, the University of Judaism's Platt Gallery is presenting a sampling of some 20 of her large lithographs under the title "Drawing on a Life: Graphic Work by Ruth Weisberg." The earliest pieces are from the '70s. Back then, she looked a little old-fashioned. Now, she appears as a keeper of the flame for traditional figurative art, while informed by Expressionism, Surrealism and the temper of our times.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1993 | NANCY KAPITANOFF, Nancy Kapitanoff writes regularly about art for The Times.
Italy has been a continuous source of inspiration for artist Ruth Weisberg since she was an 18-year-old student at the Academia di Belle Arti in Perugia many years ago. Last year at this time, she was ensconced in a studio on the top floor of the American Academy in Rome, in the middle of a five-month stay made possible by a Fulbright Scholarship and a Visiting Artist Residency at the academy.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1988 | CATHY CURTIS, Times Staff Writer
If only Ruth Weisberg had gone into films--not as an actress, but as a power behind the camera, conjuring up poignant or sensuous moments with actors in a landscape and a battery of lights and lenses. But she chose instead to be a painter and printmaker, doggedly continuing for more than 20 years to offer up her passions and introspections in a conservative, rigidly programmatic style uncomfortably close to illustration.A selection of this work is on view through Jan. 8 at the Laguna Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 21, 1988 | Cathy Curtis
If only Ruth Weisberg had chosen to go into films--not as an actress, but as a power behind the camera, conjuring up poignant or sensuous moments with actors in a landscape and a battery of lights and lenses. But the artist, who teaches at USC, chose instead to make paintings, drawings and prints--a selection of which is on view through Jan. 8 at the Laguna Art Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
Two current exhibitions sponsored by USC bring us people up close and personal. Any closer and we'd see the fillings in their teeth; any more personal and we'd read their diaries. Such exercises prove just how far art's emotional pendulum has swung since Minimal Cool reigned supreme in the '70s. Now we have art inspired--if that's the right word--by the horrors of mental retardation, nursing homes and cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1986 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, Times Art Writer
Two current exhibitions sponsored by USC bring us people up close and personal. Any closer and we'd see the fillings in their teeth; any more personal and we'd read their diaries. Such exercises prove just how far art's emotional pendulum has swung since Minimal Cool reigned supreme in the '70s. Now we have art inspired--if that's the right word--by the horrors of mental retardation, nursing homes and cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1986 | JOSINE IANCO-STARRELS
"The Jewish Heritage in American Folk Art," an exploration of a facet of folk creativity organized by the Museum of Folk Art and the Jewish Museum in New York, is on view at the Hebrew Union College's Skirball Museum through April 27. The exhibition consists of about ceremonial and secular objects from 1720 to the present. The earliest generations of Sephardic and Ashkenazic Jewish settlers, few in numbers, tended to assimilate their cultural patterns with those of the local population.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 1985 | BARBARA ISENBERG, Times Staff Writer
Ruth Weisberg was in her 20s when she first saw her grandmother's "memorial" book. Turning page after page in the thick, black book about the Polish Jews who perished in the Holocaust, Weisberg could not believe what she was reading. And, recalls her mother, Theresa Weisberg, Ruth could not stop crying. Weisberg has continued crying for those lost Jews, sometimes in print but most often on canvas.
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