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Ruthless Records Company

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1995
A hearing scheduled Monday in a dispute over the estate of rapper Eric (Eazy-E.) Wright was reset for June 19 because the judge in the case was unavailable. Several ex-lovers and business associates of Wright were due back in court Monday to continue the fight for control of Ruthless Records, the company Wright founded and left behind when he died of AIDS-related complications on March 26.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1995
A Los Angeles judge Wednesday approved a court-appointed administrator's business plan to keep Eric (Eazy-E) Wright's record company afloat while the rapper's survivors battle over his estate. Terms of the plan for Ruthless Records, which Wright founded and used to launch gangsta rap into mainstream popularity, are being kept confidential, said Jeffrey Loeb, attorney for the court-appointed Chemical Trust Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1995
A probate judge Monday ordered a special administrator to sort out the tangled estate of rapper Eazy-E and return May 22 with a business plan for the late singer's record company. Judge Robert Letteau appointed a representative of Chemical Trust Bank of California to investigate the value of Eric Wright's record label, Ruthless Records. The company has been closed because of an ownership squabble between Wright's widow, Tomica Wood, and his former business manager, Mike Klein.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1995
A hearing scheduled Monday in a dispute over the estate of rapper Eric (Eazy-E.) Wright was reset for June 19 because the judge in the case was unavailable. Several ex-lovers and business associates of Wright were due back in court Monday to continue the fight for control of Ruthless Records, the company Wright founded and left behind when he died of AIDS-related complications on March 26.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
Eazy-E was rapping about reality the other day, extolling the virtues of telling it like it is. The young Compton rapper, who also runs the rap production company Ruthless Records, was lunching with his pal, writer/rapper M.C. Ren, at a Westside deli that's one of their favorite dining spots. "Why do you think the fans like us--why they prefer our street raps over all that phony stuff out there?" asked Eazy-E, who has a hit album, "Eazy Duz It." He's also a member of the group N.W.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 1995
A Los Angeles judge Wednesday approved a court-appointed administrator's business plan to keep Eric (Eazy-E) Wright's record company afloat while the rapper's survivors battle over his estate. Terms of the plan for Ruthless Records, which Wright founded and used to launch gangsta rap into mainstream popularity, are being kept confidential, said Jeffrey Loeb, attorney for the court-appointed Chemical Trust Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1990
I don't know how long Kevin Allman's been around Los Angeles, but coffee houses (not shops) were plentiful as weeds in the '60s ("Java Joints," Jan. 28). There were at least two in one block at one time on the strip. They were like bat caves, with games and weird art and everything the current ones offer. Granted, the music was more of the "We Shall Overcome" variety. It's fascinating how each batch of young people think they invented coffee houses. I expect they'll be around forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1995 | CHUCK PHILIPS and FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Even before AIDS-stricken rap star Eric (Eazy-E) Wright was laid to rest earlier this month, Wright's former lovers and business associates were haggling in Los Angeles Superior Court for control over his dwindling fortune. "It's sad and it's shocking," said the rapper's 26-year-old widow, Tomica Woods Wright, who has a year-old child by Wright and is pregnant with another, due in September. "A lot of people who claim to know (Wright) really didn't.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1994 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rapper Eazy-E (Eric Wright) has taken on a new and rather tame venture, by his usual standards: hosting a weekly , party-style radio show on KKBT-FM ("The Beat," 92.3) Wright, who founded the rap group N.W.A., first drew controversy for writing a song that many believed advocated violence against police officers, and then later for championing the cause of LAPD Officer Theodore Briseno, who was charged with beating Rodney G. King.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1995
A probate judge Monday ordered a special administrator to sort out the tangled estate of rapper Eazy-E and return May 22 with a business plan for the late singer's record company. Judge Robert Letteau appointed a representative of Chemical Trust Bank of California to investigate the value of Eric Wright's record label, Ruthless Records. The company has been closed because of an ownership squabble between Wright's widow, Tomica Wood, and his former business manager, Mike Klein.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1990
I don't know how long Kevin Allman's been around Los Angeles, but coffee houses (not shops) were plentiful as weeds in the '60s ("Java Joints," Jan. 28). There were at least two in one block at one time on the strip. They were like bat caves, with games and weird art and everything the current ones offer. Granted, the music was more of the "We Shall Overcome" variety. It's fascinating how each batch of young people think they invented coffee houses. I expect they'll be around forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 1989 | DENNIS HUNT
Eazy-E was rapping about reality the other day, extolling the virtues of telling it like it is. The young Compton rapper, who also runs the rap production company Ruthless Records, was lunching with his pal, writer/rapper M.C. Ren, at a Westside deli that's one of their favorite dining spots. "Why do you think the fans like us--why they prefer our street raps over all that phony stuff out there?" asked Eazy-E, who has a hit album, "Eazy Duz It." He's also a member of the group N.W.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 15, 1991 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
N.W.A's success in reaching the No. 1 spot on the national pop chart with its new "Niggaz4life" album after just two weeks in the stores is remarkable on several levels. Not only has the album's controversial language kept it from receiving virtually any radio airplay, but that same stark tone has also kept the album from being sold in discount department stores that account for approximately 15% of annual record sales.
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