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OPINION
May 15, 1994
In response to "Deadly Reality: Rwanda Is Dying," editorial, on May 4: I was one of more than 200 Americans evacuated from Rwanda on April 10. Since my return to the United States, I have followed with deep anguish the tragedy that continues to unfold in Rwanda. I was privileged to work with many Rwandans who were faithful and loyal employees of the U.S. Mission in Rwanda for numerous years. Almost without exception among the Rwandans I met, the United States is revered and honored as the last real hope that is able to lead the struggling African countries to democracy and freedom.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Stephen Ceasar
As a boy, Patrick Manyika looked up and watched packages of corn and canned fish fall from the sky. An airplane streamed overhead, dropping supplies to the hundreds of refugees living in isolation in the rolling hills and forests of northeast Rwanda. The relief packages read "USAID" - it was the first word he would learn to read. Manyika lived as a child in exile on the land of a national park, survived the Rwandan genocide as a teenager and eventually made his way to a private university in Southern California.
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NEWS
December 14, 1992 | Associated Press
About 20,000 people marched in Rwanda's capital Sunday to protest increasing violence in the tiny Central African nation. Officials say an average of three people are killed daily in Kigali in political clashes.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - In scattered villages on steep green hillsides, many who killed their neighbors in Rwanda's genocide 20 years ago now live side by side with relatives of the dead. Speech that creates ethnic divisions has been outlawed. Local tribunals called gacaca courts have allowed many offenders to be released from prison in return for confessions and expressions of remorse. And a generation of young people who grew up after the mass killings embody the hope of a new breed of Rwandans who identify not by ethnicity but by nationality.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2005 | From Reuters
The director of the Oscar-nominated drama "Hotel Rwanda" said Monday he intends to use the film's popularity to help raise money for survivors of Rwanda's 1994 genocide. Terry George was in the Rwanda capital city of Kigali to show the film to thousands of survivors. Don Cheadle stars as a hotel manager who helped save more than 1,200 people during the killing spree.
WORLD
December 1, 2004 | From Associated Press
Senior Congolese officials charged Tuesday that Rwandan troops had crossed into eastern Congo and were clashing with militias there. Residents fleeing the fighting reported that 15 villagers were dead and three villages were burned. United Nations officials said they were investigating the invasion charges, which came as Rwandan President Paul Kagame told his country's parliament that Rwandan troops "might" already be in Congo, pursuing Rwandan rebels based there.
WORLD
July 31, 2002 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Surrounded by Africa's top leaders, the presidents of Rwanda and Congo signed a peace deal Tuesday to end one of the continent's most brutal wars, a largely ignored conflict that has killed an estimated 2.5 million people in four years and involved the armies of seven African nations. "It's a bright day for the African continent," declared an ebullient South African President Thabo Mbeki, who brokered the deal.
NEWS
May 31, 1993 | Associated Press
Rwanda's government and the rebel Rwandese Patriotic Front agreed Sunday to resettle 650,000 people displaced by renewed fighting early this year. According to the agreement, the people will reclaim property in a northern demilitarized zone. The agreement was signed in Kinihira, a small town 43 miles north of Rwanda's capital, Kigali, after 20 days of negotiations between the government and rebels.
WORLD
October 6, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Rwanda withdrew its last troops from neighboring Congo, with about 1,100 soldiers marching single file out of the country, Rwandan Maj. Gen. James Kabarebe said. Thousands of civilians lined the roads and a helicopter gunship flew overhead as the troops, who were deployed in the border town of Goma and surrounding areas, walked the few miles from a sports stadium to Gisenyi, Rwanda. The withdrawal was approved under a July 30 peace deal aimed at ending Congo's four-year war.
WORLD
July 22, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
AFRICA * Rwanda and Congo have made progress in peace talks, but a comprehensive deal on how to end the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo has yet to be struck, a government official said in South Africa, where the talks were being held. The official said Congo was ready to allow the rounding up of senior Hutu extremist militiamen responsible for Rwanda's 1994 genocide, and whom Rwanda sees as a constant security threat.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Chelsea Clinton
This past summer, in a small village outside of Phnom Penh, not far from the Mekong River, I met an 8-year-old boy named Basil. He couldn't stop laughing, playing, racing around the village like any boy his age. Visiting him meant something special to me because my father had met Basil too, in 2005. At the time, Basil was a tubercular baby ravaged by AIDS and abandoned by his family, with little hope for survival. Back then, infants who had gotten the disease from their mothers were 25% of the cases in Cambodia.
OPINION
November 13, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Most bio-pics are made about somebodies - warriors, kings, artists. This was a bio-pic about a nobody who became a somebody during the Rwandan genocide, a bloody crossroads for a country with deep-seated ethnic frictions. In April 1994, Paul Rusesabagina was brevetted as general manager of the luxury hotel where he worked, and where more than 1,000 people had fled from the killing rampage. For more than two months, he managed to protect them from being slaughtered. Ten years later, the world saw "Hotel Rwanda.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Congolese troops backed by a U.N. force on Wednesday drove insurgents from the M23 group from their last stronghold in eastern Congo, raising hopes that the government might defeat the rebels and begin to bring some stability to the troubled region. Bertrand Bisimwa, civilian leader with the M23 rebels, reportedly fled across the border into Uganda, with Congolese officials calling on authorities there to hand him over. The fall of Bunagana, the rebels' headquarters, follows intense fighting in the eastern reaches of the Democratic Republic of Congo after the collapse of peace talks last week over M23's demands that its leaders receive amnesty.
OPINION
December 25, 2012
Re "Pressure mounts on U.S. to curtail aid to Rwanda," Dec. 21 This article casually mentions the killing of about 5 million people in Congo, many of them by rebels assisted by Rwanda, which receives U.S. aid. I was under the impression that the civilized world (which includes the U.S., although after recent events one wonders) had agreed with the Jews after World War II to adopt the motto "never again. " Now it appears to have changed to, "Well, it's OK as long as they are not white.
WORLD
December 20, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
GOMA, Congo - It was not the bullet lodged in the officer's gut, or the botched operation he'd had in a field hospital, that made the case so difficult for doctors in a Goma hospital. It was trying to save the life of a Rwandan officer injured in the recent Congolese battle for the eastern city when Rwanda's government insisted it wasn't involved in the Goma fighting. Doctors were convinced the officer would die if he wasn't sent home to Rwanda, where he could get better medical care.
NEWS
December 14, 2012 | By Michael McGough
Four thoughts about Susan Rice's decision to withdraw as a possible nominee for secretary of State: 1) Rice should not have been disqualified because of her now-notorious talk-show comments about the attack in Benghazi, Libya, that killed four Americans. As The Times observed in an editorial, her comments “faithfully tracked 'talking points' that were assembled by intelligence officials and only slightly edited by the White House and State Department.”  The excision of references to a possible Al Qaeda connection were apparently made by intelligence officials, not the White House, and while Rice has been criticized for saying in one interview that Al Qaeda had been decimated, she also said: “Whether they were Al Qaeda affiliates, whether they were Libyan-based extremists or Al Qaeda itself, I think is one of the things we'll have to determine.
WORLD
July 16, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.N. tribunal in Arusha, Tanzania, convicted a former Rwandan finance minister of three counts of genocide and crimes against humanity, and it sentenced him to life in prison. Emmanuel Ndindabahizi, 54, was convicted of aiding the slaughter in Kibuye province in western Rwanda in 1994. More than 800,000 people, most of them from the Tutsi minority, were massacred by members of the Hutu majority.
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A Belgian colonel blamed for the deaths of 10 Belgian U.N. peacekeepers in Rwanda in 1994 went on trial before a military court in Brussels amid media criticism of the proceedings. The soldiers were killed April 7, 1994, while they were trying to protect Rwanda's prime minister at the outset of the genocide that followed the death of the nation's president. Col. Luc Marchal, who maintains his innocence, is accused of failing to foresee and stop the killing of the Belgian peacekeepers.
WORLD
November 24, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Regional leaders pressured a Congolese rebel group Saturday to give up its military gains and stop an offensive that could lead to a catastrophic war in eastern Congo. After an emergency summit in the Ugandan capital of Kampala, the presidents of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania urged the M23 rebels to withdraw. Rebels on Tuesday took Goma, a city of about a million people in eastern Congo. Congo government forces did not put up a fight.
WORLD
November 19, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
Reports of escalating clashes in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo raised renewed fears of outright war Monday, as rebels again neared the provincial capital of Goma. The M23 rebels had pledged to halt their push toward Goma in order to negotiate, but government officials shot down the idea of talks, saying they were useless because Rwanda was pulling the strings behind the scenes. New violence erupted on the outskirts of Goma only hours after rebels made their pledge, the Associated Press reported.
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