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September 1, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.N. mission has warned of yet another bitter harvest from the murderous ethnic turmoil in Rwanda: catastrophic drops in farm output that necessitate immediate outside food aid for no less than half the population. As a result of genocide, civil war and a colossal exodus of refugees, this autumn's crop of cereals and beans in the Central African country will plummet to 40% of last year's total, U.N. specialists said.
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NEWS
September 1, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A U.N. mission has warned of yet another bitter harvest from the murderous ethnic turmoil in Rwanda: catastrophic drops in farm output that necessitate immediate outside food aid for no less than half the population. As a result of genocide, civil war and a colossal exodus of refugees, this autumn's crop of cereals and beans in the Central African country will plummet to 40% of last year's total, U.N. specialists said.
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NEWS
October 1, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Open the door to the government's banana ripening room and the cockroaches run for cover on the sweating concrete walls. The aroma is familiar, thickly sweet and overpowering. Everything feels sticky. Thousands of fingers of green fruit grow yellow here, packed to the rafters in the stifling heat. "When you put bananas together, they produce a warmth all their own," a banana factory official, Bernardin Kagina, said admiringly. Bananas are more than a farm crop in Rwanda.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Open the door to the government's banana ripening room and the cockroaches run for cover on the sweating concrete walls. The aroma is familiar, thickly sweet and overpowering. Everything feels sticky. Thousands of fingers of green fruit grow yellow here, packed to the rafters in the stifling heat. "When you put bananas together, they produce a warmth all their own," a banana factory official, Bernardin Kagina, said admiringly. Bananas are more than a farm crop in Rwanda.
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