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Rwanda Borders Zaire

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NEWS
August 20, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing that another Goma is about to consume their country, Zairian authorities threatened to close the border from Rwanda and to try to halt an ever-growing tide of refugees, the U.N. refugee office said Friday. Already, about 136,000 Rwandans have moved across the Rusizi River from Rwanda into Bukavu, Zaire--with only 56,000 of them now contained in camps and the rest clogging this onetime resort city. Raw sewage is running in the streets, and diseases are spreading. The Office of the U.N.
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NEWS
August 21, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing a mounting refugee tide, Zaire closed its border with Rwanda on Saturday, sending a ripple of panic through tens of thousands of escaping Rwandans. After 24 hours of vague warnings, the Zairian government at 2 p.m. abruptly halted the stream of refugees shuffling across a one-lane bridge from Rwanda into Bukavu. They had been crossing at the rate of about 100 a minute since the border was opened at its regular time of 6 a.m.
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NEWS
August 21, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing a mounting refugee tide, Zaire closed its border with Rwanda on Saturday, sending a ripple of panic through tens of thousands of escaping Rwandans. After 24 hours of vague warnings, the Zairian government at 2 p.m. abruptly halted the stream of refugees shuffling across a one-lane bridge from Rwanda into Bukavu. They had been crossing at the rate of about 100 a minute since the border was opened at its regular time of 6 a.m.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing that another Goma is about to consume their country, Zairian authorities threatened to close the border from Rwanda and to try to halt an ever-growing tide of refugees, the U.N. refugee office said Friday. Already, about 136,000 Rwandans have moved across the Rusizi River from Rwanda into Bukavu, Zaire--with only 56,000 of them now contained in camps and the rest clogging this onetime resort city. Raw sewage is running in the streets, and diseases are spreading. The Office of the U.N.
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