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NEWS
April 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A Rwandan court acquitted a former official charged in the 1994 genocide of more than 800,000 people, state-run Radio Rwanda reported. The criminal court in Kibuye, west of Kigali, the capital, cleared former Deputy Gov. Ignace Banyaga of charges that he helped kill thousands of minority Tutsis seeking shelter at a local church and a stadium in April 1994.
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WORLD
August 9, 2003 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Arguing that a proposal to reform two U.N. war crimes tribunals is actually an effort to quash the courts' independence, chief prosecutor Carla del Ponte appealed to the Security Council on Friday not to halve her duties. But the majority of the 15-member council said the issue was effectiveness, not independence, and they agreed with Secretary-General Kofi Annan's assessment that prosecuting war crimes for both Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia was too big a job for one person.
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NEWS
April 12, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where the stench of death still fills churches and schools and the horrors of genocide haunt the psyche and soul, what is to be done with Cyprien Nzavugankize? Thin and intense, the 37-year-old farmer stands barefoot in the mud outside a crypt-like brick jail here and calmly confesses that he butchered more than 200 people during Rwanda's reign of terror two years ago. Nzavugankize was in the Hutu militia.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A Rwandan court acquitted a former official charged in the 1994 genocide of more than 800,000 people, state-run Radio Rwanda reported. The criminal court in Kibuye, west of Kigali, the capital, cleared former Deputy Gov. Ignace Banyaga of charges that he helped kill thousands of minority Tutsis seeking shelter at a local church and a stadium in April 1994.
WORLD
August 9, 2003 | Maggie Farley, Times Staff Writer
Arguing that a proposal to reform two U.N. war crimes tribunals is actually an effort to quash the courts' independence, chief prosecutor Carla del Ponte appealed to the Security Council on Friday not to halve her duties. But the majority of the 15-member council said the issue was effectiveness, not independence, and they agreed with Secretary-General Kofi Annan's assessment that prosecuting war crimes for both Rwanda and the former Yugoslavia was too big a job for one person.
WORLD
June 20, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
RWANDA * Residents of Rwanda's capital, Kigali, met in a dusty clearing to open the first session of a community court to try neighbors accused of participating in a 1994 genocide. Survivors joined the suspects to learn procedures and schedule the weekly sessions. Similar openings were held at 12 locations across Rwanda. The courts are being used to speed up trials for the 115,000 people suspected of taking part in the massacre of more than 800,000 Tutsis and Hutu moderates.
WORLD
April 25, 2005 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
The sight of a mob murdering his father has given Naphtal Ahishakiye no peace these last 11 years. It was May 28, 1994, one crime among millions during Rwanda's genocide. Helpless and hidden in a tree, he watched the mob stuff his father headfirst down a latrine. But the long wait for justice has ended in disappointment. At a recent community hearing, witnesses identified the killers as militia members who had fled Rwanda after the genocide and were beyond the reach of the law.
WORLD
August 19, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
Issa Munyangaju is willing to tell his story, but he requires a beer. He sips a Primus in a dim concrete bar and talks about the houseboy he shot during the genocide. They were friends, he says, until they came to a roadblock manned by Hutu militiamen. They gave Munyangaju, also Hutu, a gun. They told him he would be killed if he didn't execute his friend, whose ethnic group, the Tutsis, had been targeted for extermination. "I followed their orders," Munyangaju, 44, says. He put a bullet in the young man's stomach, and was within earshot when another shot finished him off. While he was in prison, government officials visited to tout the benefits of confessing at a type of trial known as gacaca (pronounced ga-CHA-cha)
WORLD
May 29, 2002 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight years ago, roving gangs of militia members killed his parents, his wife, their four young children and 19 other close relatives during the genocide of ethnic Tutsis. Now Lin Rusekampunzi is getting ready to pass judgment on the accused. In the United States, the 43-year-old mechanic would be automatically disqualified from sitting on a jury hearing the case.
WORLD
September 30, 2003 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
In the end, Charles Kagenza's faith was stronger than the hallowed hall that once stood here. Even after all that has happened, Kagenza wanted to come to the Catholic church -- where he still prays every Sunday for God's grace, the place where thousands were forsaken. In fact, the proud brick temple that overlooked three valleys is gone. There's just rubble, a couple of lonely pillars and a large mass grave.
NEWS
April 12, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a land where the stench of death still fills churches and schools and the horrors of genocide haunt the psyche and soul, what is to be done with Cyprien Nzavugankize? Thin and intense, the 37-year-old farmer stands barefoot in the mud outside a crypt-like brick jail here and calmly confesses that he butchered more than 200 people during Rwanda's reign of terror two years ago. Nzavugankize was in the Hutu militia.
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