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NEWS
August 27, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A teen-age soldier with a scarred carbine and curious eyes asks the departing American, "So, what do you think of Rwanda now?" What, indeed? You wish for a coherent answer. But all you can do is shrug, because how can you tell this eager young man that you think he lives in one of the most beautiful places on Earth and one of the most horrible? Dare you tell him that you fear that doom has half a century's head start over hope in the footrace for Rwanda's future?
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NEWS
August 27, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A teen-age soldier with a scarred carbine and curious eyes asks the departing American, "So, what do you think of Rwanda now?" What, indeed? You wish for a coherent answer. But all you can do is shrug, because how can you tell this eager young man that you think he lives in one of the most beautiful places on Earth and one of the most horrible? Dare you tell him that you fear that doom has half a century's head start over hope in the footrace for Rwanda's future?
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NEWS
October 1, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Open the door to the government's banana ripening room and the cockroaches run for cover on the sweating concrete walls. The aroma is familiar, thickly sweet and overpowering. Everything feels sticky. Thousands of fingers of green fruit grow yellow here, packed to the rafters in the stifling heat. "When you put bananas together, they produce a warmth all their own," a banana factory official, Bernardin Kagina, said admiringly. Bananas are more than a farm crop in Rwanda.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | Reuters
A government decision to fix the bride price at three hoes instead of the traditional cow has caused outrage in Rwanda and could be reversed by a national congress of the ruling party later this month. "Three hoes is devaluing a young girl," grumble mothers with daughters of marriageable age in Kigali, the capital. "Three hoes are worth less than a basket of bananas," one old man in this small Central African country protested.
NEWS
June 17, 1988 | Reuters
A government decision to fix the bride price at three hoes instead of the traditional cow has caused outrage in Rwanda and could be reversed by a national congress of the ruling party later this month. "Three hoes is devaluing a young girl," grumble mothers with daughters of marriageable age in Kigali, the capital. "Three hoes are worth less than a basket of bananas," one old man in this small Central African country protested.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Open the door to the government's banana ripening room and the cockroaches run for cover on the sweating concrete walls. The aroma is familiar, thickly sweet and overpowering. Everything feels sticky. Thousands of fingers of green fruit grow yellow here, packed to the rafters in the stifling heat. "When you put bananas together, they produce a warmth all their own," a banana factory official, Bernardin Kagina, said admiringly. Bananas are more than a farm crop in Rwanda.
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