Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRwanda Economy
IN THE NEWS

Rwanda Economy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Pope John Paul II, in Kabgayi, Rwanda, called for a narrowing of the gap between Africa's urban elite and rural poor and urged peasants in this infertile nation to redouble efforts to improve the quality of their lives. The pontiff said Rwandan peasants, who make up more than 80% of the population of 7 million, have the right to demand the same health, social and administrative facilities, including credit banking, as their urban counterparts.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past two months, civil servants have gone unpaid and have lived off aid parcels from the World Food Program. The government's coffers are empty. At the moment, it can afford one ambassador abroad, an envoy at the United Nations. In the shabby building where the prime minister has installed his office, the telephones don't work, there's no electricity and the water doesn't run.
Advertisement
NEWS
September 18, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past two months, civil servants have gone unpaid and have lived off aid parcels from the World Food Program. The government's coffers are empty. At the moment, it can afford one ambassador abroad, an envoy at the United Nations. In the shabby building where the prime minister has installed his office, the telephones don't work, there's no electricity and the water doesn't run.
NEWS
August 27, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A teen-age soldier with a scarred carbine and curious eyes asks the departing American, "So, what do you think of Rwanda now?" What, indeed? You wish for a coherent answer. But all you can do is shrug, because how can you tell this eager young man that you think he lives in one of the most beautiful places on Earth and one of the most horrible? Dare you tell him that you fear that doom has half a century's head start over hope in the footrace for Rwanda's future?
NEWS
August 27, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A teen-age soldier with a scarred carbine and curious eyes asks the departing American, "So, what do you think of Rwanda now?" What, indeed? You wish for a coherent answer. But all you can do is shrug, because how can you tell this eager young man that you think he lives in one of the most beautiful places on Earth and one of the most horrible? Dare you tell him that you fear that doom has half a century's head start over hope in the footrace for Rwanda's future?
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Open the door to the government's banana ripening room and the cockroaches run for cover on the sweating concrete walls. The aroma is familiar, thickly sweet and overpowering. Everything feels sticky. Thousands of fingers of green fruit grow yellow here, packed to the rafters in the stifling heat. "When you put bananas together, they produce a warmth all their own," a banana factory official, Bernardin Kagina, said admiringly. Bananas are more than a farm crop in Rwanda.
WORLD
August 25, 2003 | Solomon Moore, Times Staff Writer
The first presidential election since this country was roiled in a massive genocidal conflict in 1994 will take place today. With Rwanda's economy on the rebound and special genocide courts meting out punishment at a quickening clip, the poll was billed as further evidence that the "land of 1,000 hills" was on the mend after interethnic violence that left more than 800,000 dead.
OPINION
December 13, 2005 | PAUL WOLFOWITZ, PAUL WOLFOWITZ is president of the World Bank
THIS WEEK, trade ministers from 148 nations are gathering in Hong Kong for negotiations hosted by the World Trade Organization, the latest in the so-called Doha development round that started in Doha, Qatar, four years ago. The aim of these negotiations has been to liberalize trade -- especially to open the world's richest markets to the world's poorest producers of goods and services. And the crucial issue in Hong Kong is agriculture.
OPINION
April 6, 2014 | By Jonathan Tepperman
KIGALI, Rwanda - Twenty years ago Monday, the state of Rwanda set about trying to hack itself out of existence. Starting on April 7, 1994, Hutu extremists, in a premeditated 100-day campaign, systematically butchered close to 1 million Tutsis - three-quarters of all those in the country - as well as moderate Hutus, driving countless more into exile. Yet two decades later, Rwanda is very much alive; indeed, in many respects, it's thriving. But it remains a confounding place. Visit the country today and you find a remarkably peaceful and well-ordered land.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Pope John Paul II, in Kabgayi, Rwanda, called for a narrowing of the gap between Africa's urban elite and rural poor and urged peasants in this infertile nation to redouble efforts to improve the quality of their lives. The pontiff said Rwandan peasants, who make up more than 80% of the population of 7 million, have the right to demand the same health, social and administrative facilities, including credit banking, as their urban counterparts.
NEWS
October 1, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Open the door to the government's banana ripening room and the cockroaches run for cover on the sweating concrete walls. The aroma is familiar, thickly sweet and overpowering. Everything feels sticky. Thousands of fingers of green fruit grow yellow here, packed to the rafters in the stifling heat. "When you put bananas together, they produce a warmth all their own," a banana factory official, Bernardin Kagina, said admiringly. Bananas are more than a farm crop in Rwanda.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|