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NEWS
August 26, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations regained jurisdiction over Rwanda's 1.2 million refugees Friday, but its plan to resume sending them home took off sluggishly. Even allowing time to smooth the rough spots, this week's sound and fury over resettlement of exiled ethnic Hutus has served to remind the nations of this Central African region, and the developed world, that peaceful resolution of this predicament could take a year--more likely years.
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NEWS
November 9, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A battle Friday for control of the world's largest refugee camp appeared to mark a bitter resumption of Rwanda's genocidal war of 1994--but with the bloodletting now across the border in eastern Zaire. Mortar and antiaircraft fire roared for a second day around the vast Mugunga refugee camp, about 12 miles northwest of the Zairian border city of Goma and the last known location of more than 400,000 ethnic Hutu refugees. It wasn't clear how many remained at the squalid site.
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NEWS
October 31, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tito Nankimbesha trudged slowly across the grassy field, his bony arms cradling a small bundle wrapped in red cotton cloth. Ahead, two men with hoes chopped short, shallow rectangles in the hard earth. Another twisted sticks into four tiny crosses. A searing wind blew down from the hazy heights of Zaire's eastern escarpment. "He died of thirst," the 50-year-old peasant said as he put down the body of his son, Habimaiya, 2.
NEWS
October 31, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tito Nankimbesha trudged slowly across the grassy field, his bony arms cradling a small bundle wrapped in red cotton cloth. Ahead, two men with hoes chopped short, shallow rectangles in the hard earth. Another twisted sticks into four tiny crosses. A searing wind blew down from the hazy heights of Zaire's eastern escarpment. "He died of thirst," the 50-year-old peasant said as he put down the body of his son, Habimaiya, 2.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing that another Goma is about to consume their country, Zairian authorities threatened to close the border from Rwanda and to try to halt an ever-growing tide of refugees, the U.N. refugee office said Friday. Already, about 136,000 Rwandans have moved across the Rusizi River from Rwanda into Bukavu, Zaire--with only 56,000 of them now contained in camps and the rest clogging this onetime resort city. Raw sewage is running in the streets, and diseases are spreading. The Office of the U.N.
NEWS
November 9, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A battle Friday for control of the world's largest refugee camp appeared to mark a bitter resumption of Rwanda's genocidal war of 1994--but with the bloodletting now across the border in eastern Zaire. Mortar and antiaircraft fire roared for a second day around the vast Mugunga refugee camp, about 12 miles northwest of the Zairian border city of Goma and the last known location of more than 400,000 ethnic Hutu refugees. It wasn't clear how many remained at the squalid site.
NEWS
September 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
Rwanda and Zaire pledged Thursday to help an estimated 1.2 million Hutu refugees return to their homeland in Rwanda from wretched camps in eastern Zaire, and Zaire urged that they return by the end of this month. Filippo Grandi, the field chief for the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Goma, said it was "a big achievement" that both countries had agreed to work together.
NEWS
August 26, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations regained jurisdiction over Rwanda's 1.2 million refugees Friday, but its plan to resume sending them home took off sluggishly. Even allowing time to smooth the rough spots, this week's sound and fury over resettlement of exiled ethnic Hutus has served to remind the nations of this Central African region, and the developed world, that peaceful resolution of this predicament could take a year--more likely years.
NEWS
September 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
Rwanda and Zaire pledged Thursday to help an estimated 1.2 million Hutu refugees return to their homeland in Rwanda from wretched camps in eastern Zaire, and Zaire urged that they return by the end of this month. Filippo Grandi, the field chief for the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Goma, said it was "a big achievement" that both countries had agreed to work together.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing that another Goma is about to consume their country, Zairian authorities threatened to close the border from Rwanda and to try to halt an ever-growing tide of refugees, the U.N. refugee office said Friday. Already, about 136,000 Rwandans have moved across the Rusizi River from Rwanda into Bukavu, Zaire--with only 56,000 of them now contained in camps and the rest clogging this onetime resort city. Raw sewage is running in the streets, and diseases are spreading. The Office of the U.N.
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