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NEWS
September 18, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past two months, civil servants have gone unpaid and have lived off aid parcels from the World Food Program. The government's coffers are empty. At the moment, it can afford one ambassador abroad, an envoy at the United Nations. In the shabby building where the prime minister has installed his office, the telephones don't work, there's no electricity and the water doesn't run.
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NEWS
March 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Rwandans voted in local elections in the first secret balloting since more than 800,000 people were massacred in the tiny central African country in 1994. Political parties have been banned from fielding candidates for fear of rekindling the ethnic hatred that prompted the genocide. Instead, more than 8,000 candidates vied on independent platforms for positions in community councils across the country.
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NEWS
April 16, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There is no space remaining in hell today. The doomed already fill it. They live, sleep, eat, rot and die squeezed together four men per square yard in the roofless brick box that is Gitarama Prison. Built to confine 400 on a ridge among the banana and potato communes of central Rwanda, the prison yard is now engorged with 6,793. There is no room to lie and sleep, no space to sit.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | From Reuters
Paul Kagame took the oath as president Saturday, pledging to fight internal ethnic divisions that sparked Rwanda's horrific 1994 genocide. Kagame, a former rebel army leader whose group came to power in 1994 and ended a state-sponsored genocide that left more than 800,000 people dead, becomes the tiny Central African nation's first president from the minority Tutsis since independence from Belgium in 1962.
NEWS
September 14, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the countryside, saboteurs pull down some electrical power poles. The army moves in to hunt them down. There is an ambush. A lieutenant is killed. Furious soldiers fan into the muddy banana groves. Shooting starts. Machetes flash in the moonlight. Ten hours later, the crackle of gunfire and the cries of its victims cease. On Wednesday morning, 108 men, women and children are piled up dead in three adjacent rural villages. Sixteen other people are gravely injured.
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though another panicky flight of Rwandans may be the outcome, Rwanda's government began a three-stage operation Monday to quickly assert its authority in the U.N.-policed "safe zone," where fears of its wrath and rule triggered an exodus last month.
NEWS
December 26, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The contagious sound of laughter and cheerful chatter greets teacher Julia Mukamutari on most mornings as she strolls past the local prison on her daily errands. On a typical morning, she waved at the throng of sweaty bodies crushed up against the bars of the jail. Some of the lean, adolescent figures smiled and waved back. Mukamutari knows them personally. Many of them used to be her students.
NEWS
March 7, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Rwandans voted in local elections in the first secret balloting since more than 800,000 people were massacred in the tiny central African country in 1994. Political parties have been banned from fielding candidates for fear of rekindling the ethnic hatred that prompted the genocide. Instead, more than 8,000 candidates vied on independent platforms for positions in community councils across the country.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Friends of a slain Rwandan opposition leader accused the Kigali government of ordering his assassination in Kenya, where he was in exile. Seth Sendashonga, who survived an attempt on his life in Nairobi in 1996, was shot dead in his car in a Nairobi traffic jam on Saturday. His driver later died of his wounds. "The government in Kigali does not tolerate opposition. There is no doubt in my mind that they did this," Sendashonga's secretary said.
NEWS
April 23, 2000 | From Reuters
Paul Kagame took the oath as president Saturday, pledging to fight internal ethnic divisions that sparked Rwanda's horrific 1994 genocide. Kagame, a former rebel army leader whose group came to power in 1994 and ended a state-sponsored genocide that left more than 800,000 people dead, becomes the tiny Central African nation's first president from the minority Tutsis since independence from Belgium in 1962.
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A former rebel leader whose forces stopped the 1994 genocide in Rwanda was chosen president Monday, becoming the nation's first Tutsi leader since it won independence from Belgium in 1962. Emerging as the formal head of a country he has controlled as vice president and defense minister for six years, Paul Kagame, 43, was selected by the parliament and the Cabinet in an 81-5 secret ballot. He had previously declined the presidency for fear of antagonizing the nation's 85% Hutu majority.
NEWS
November 7, 1999 | Associated Press
The Rwandan government suspended cooperation with a U.N. tribunal on Saturday after the court freed on a technicality a former official accused of helping organize the nation's 1994 genocide. The government criticized Wednesday's decision by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda to immediately release Jean-Bosco Barayagwiza, a former Foreign Ministry official who was being held in Arusha, Tanzania, where the court is based.
NEWS
December 26, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The contagious sound of laughter and cheerful chatter greets teacher Julia Mukamutari on most mornings as she strolls past the local prison on her daily errands. On a typical morning, she waved at the throng of sweaty bodies crushed up against the bars of the jail. Some of the lean, adolescent figures smiled and waved back. Mukamutari knows them personally. Many of them used to be her students.
NEWS
May 18, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Friends of a slain Rwandan opposition leader accused the Kigali government of ordering his assassination in Kenya, where he was in exile. Seth Sendashonga, who survived an attempt on his life in Nairobi in 1996, was shot dead in his car in a Nairobi traffic jam on Saturday. His driver later died of his wounds. "The government in Kigali does not tolerate opposition. There is no doubt in my mind that they did this," Sendashonga's secretary said.
NEWS
April 25, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ignoring international appeals for mercy, including a clemency plea from Pope John Paul II, the Rwandan government on Friday executed 22 people convicted of crimes in connection with the 1994 genocide that killed more than 800,000 people in this country. While 18 of the 22 were publicly put to death in four provincial towns where major massacres were committed, the condemned in Kigali faced a firing squad at a red clay soccer field.
NEWS
November 26, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Demanding aid instead of soldiers, Rwanda has told an 1,800- member U.N. peacekeeping force to leave when the troops' authorization expires in two weeks, Rwandan radio reported Saturday. Such a withdrawal would make it harder for U.N. refugee officials to persuade the 1.2 million Rwandans still living in Zaire and other neighboring countries to return home. The U.N.
NEWS
July 20, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
Victorious Tutsi-led rebels installed a "national unity" government Tuesday and urged a halt to the desperate flight of millions of terrorized Rwandan refugees. Nearly half of this Central African nation's population has either fled or is on the move toward the border with Zaire. Maj. Gen.
NEWS
November 26, 1994 | From Reuters
Rwanda in stalled an interim Parliament on Friday with the enormous tasks of reconciling its two main ethnic groups, rebuilding its economy and ushering in democratic rule. One by one, the 70 members of the Transitional National Assembly stood, Bible in hand, and took an oath before hundreds of their countrymen in a Kigali stadium. They pledged to work toward unity of their central African country, in which up to a million people died in massacres and civil war between April and July.
NEWS
September 14, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the countryside, saboteurs pull down some electrical power poles. The army moves in to hunt them down. There is an ambush. A lieutenant is killed. Furious soldiers fan into the muddy banana groves. Shooting starts. Machetes flash in the moonlight. Ten hours later, the crackle of gunfire and the cries of its victims cease. On Wednesday morning, 108 men, women and children are piled up dead in three adjacent rural villages. Sixteen other people are gravely injured.
NEWS
April 26, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the international image of his government horribly tarnished, Rwanda's military leader asked the world Tuesday not to rush to judgment about the killings at Kibeho camp, arguing that his soldiers were up against an organized enemy militia--not helpless refugees. Paul Kagame, who holds the rank of vice president and defense minister but who is Rwanda's most powerful government official, said his soldiers faced a mass charge, orchestrated by a Hutu militia.
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