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February 17, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The broad swath that AIDS is cutting through Africa is restructuring the pattern of family life there, experts said Saturday. By the year 2015, at least 2.4 million women will die of AIDS every year in the countries south of the Sahara Desert, according to U.S. Census Bureau projections presented here at a meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science.
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NEWS
February 17, 1991 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
The broad swath that AIDS is cutting through Africa is restructuring the pattern of family life there, experts said Saturday. By the year 2015, at least 2.4 million women will die of AIDS every year in the countries south of the Sahara Desert, according to U.S. Census Bureau projections presented here at a meeting of the American Assn. for the Advancement of Science.
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NEWS
January 21, 1990 | NEIL HENRY, THE WASHINGTON POST
Down from the foggy hills of eucalyptus and pine came Kezia Uzamukunda, her 3-month-old baby boy strapped to her back, for the injection of a measles vaccine that she knew would keep him healthy. Braving a cold morning rain, the 34-year-old woman hiked with 29 other peasant mothers, all of them barefoot, arriving after four hours at a remote health clinic here run by a Roman Catholic order called the Sisters of Notre Dame.
NEWS
January 21, 1990 | NEIL HENRY, THE WASHINGTON POST
Down from the foggy hills of eucalyptus and pine came Kezia Uzamukunda, her 3-month-old baby boy strapped to her back, for the injection of a measles vaccine that she knew would keep him healthy. Braving a cold morning rain, the 34-year-old woman hiked with 29 other peasant mothers, all of them barefoot, arriving after four hours at a remote health clinic here run by a Roman Catholic order called the Sisters of Notre Dame.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2011 | By Steve Terill, Special to the Los Angeles Times
— Beneath a star-filled African sky, crowds of city dwellers and rural farmers gather before a giant inflatable screen. It's movie night in Rwanda and thousands have come to see films selected in this year's Rwanda Film Festival. Most of them have never seen a motion picture on a large screen before and for many this will be the first feature-length film they have ever seen — in any format. Seventeen years after the genocide that tore this country apart — killing more than 800,000 in just 100 days — there is a palpable sense of renewal in Rwanda.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2007 | By Charles Piller and Doug Smith, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
A neighbor shaved Matsepang Nyoba's head with an antiquated razor. Blood beaded on her scalp. Tears trickled down her cheeks, but not because of the pain. She was in mourning, and this was a ritual. Two days earlier, her newborn baby girl had died in the roach-infested maternity ward of Queen Elizabeth II, a crumbling sprawl that is the largest hospital in Lesotho, a mountainous nation of 2.1 million people surrounded by South Africa. Nyoba, 30, whose given name means "mother, have hope," has AIDS.
NEWS
September 12, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spanish nuns, Swedish civil defense workers, French doctors have come to bind this nation's wounds, hug its orphans and mend its schools. But for one small group of Americans, the sense of duty and dedication is as personal as their genes and family tree. Their skin, like that of the Rwandans, is black. "For me, when we made that 'middle passage' to America, it didn't sever our ties or our responsibilities," Cary Alan Johnson says.
NATIONAL
December 16, 2007 | Charles Piller and Doug Smith, Times Staff Writers
Aneighbor shaved Matsepang Nyoba's head with an antiquated razor. Blood beaded on her scalp. Tears trickled down her cheeks, but not because of the pain. She was in mourning, and this was a ritual. Two days earlier, her newborn baby girl had died in the roach-infested maternity ward of Queen Elizabeth II, a crumbling sprawl that is the largest hospital in Lesotho, a mountainous nation of 2.1 million people surrounded by South Africa.
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