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June 11, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The explosion heard in the skies over Kigali at 9:40 on the night of April 6 caused no great alarm. The capital had been tense for weeks, and the sounds of grenades and rifle fire hardly made anyone flinch anymore. "Nothing to worry about. Probably just thunder," Phillippe Lambiliotte, a Belgian businessman, reassured his wife. The night was thick with humidity and heat and more silent than usual. Lambiliotte remembers hearing a dog bark.
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NEWS
June 11, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The explosion heard in the skies over Kigali at 9:40 on the night of April 6 caused no great alarm. The capital had been tense for weeks, and the sounds of grenades and rifle fire hardly made anyone flinch anymore. "Nothing to worry about. Probably just thunder," Phillippe Lambiliotte, a Belgian businessman, reassured his wife. The night was thick with humidity and heat and more silent than usual. Lambiliotte remembers hearing a dog bark.
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NEWS
April 8, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All morning they growled up the hill, a caravan of cattle trucks, dump trucks, flatbeds, pickups, delivery trucks. People along the roadside bowed their heads and covered their noses and walked in procession. This cargo was Rwanda's horrible history. Skeletons, bodies, pieces of 6,000 human beings were transported up lush, green, tranquil Rebero Hill, the highest point overlooking the capital of Kigali.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the bed of a pickup truck in the red mud of an African hilltop, one enemy reached out to another Tuesday in a desperate overture to save what is left of a nation. Here in a "safe zone" of Rwanda, protected by French marines, a delegation from the nation's new government stood before thousands of followers of the defeated old government. Their message: Don't flee. Don't create another refugee crisis for the world. Don't be afraid. Rebuild Rwanda. About 1.
NEWS
May 30, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The signs are ominous: Rwanda seems to be tumbling toward a resumption of civil war. On Monday, the international organization Human Rights Watch issued a report substantiating fears of Rwanda's young government and concerns of independent officials in the region: The defeated and exiled army of the former regime is rearming and preparing to try to retake the country by force. Moreover, Human Rights Watch said the campaign by these armed ethnic Hutus threatens to destabilize the entire region.
NEWS
April 26, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the international image of his government horribly tarnished, Rwanda's military leader asked the world Tuesday not to rush to judgment about the killings at Kibeho camp, arguing that his soldiers were up against an organized enemy militia--not helpless refugees. Paul Kagame, who holds the rank of vice president and defense minister but who is Rwanda's most powerful government official, said his soldiers faced a mass charge, orchestrated by a Hutu militia.
NEWS
May 2, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A tragedy averted and a tragedy under way: that is the tale of two national parks and the diminishing frontier between Africa's splendors and sorrows. At least so far, Rwanda's raging violence has bypassed the most famous of its wild preserves. Surviving, perhaps even thriving, in the high-mountain rain forest of the northwest is a significant share of the world's mountain gorillas.
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