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Rwanda Refugees

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NEWS
June 29, 1994 | From Reuters
The United Nations began feeding people in a newly discovered camp of 5,000 refugees on the outskirts of Rwanda's capital Tuesday, and the Red Cross evacuated 39 seriously wounded people to its clinic. Maj. Jean-Guy Plante, military spokesman for the U.N. Assistance Mission in Rwanda, said aid workers rushed food to a camp at Ndera, on the rebel-held outskirts of Kigali.
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NEWS
June 4, 1997 | From Reuters
The U.N. refugee agency urged Congo President Laurent Kabila and other African leaders Tuesday to take steps to protect Rwandan refugees in the wake of the killing last week of an aid worker and four refugees in the eastern Congo. Spokeswoman Pam O'Toole said the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees is suspending its aid work at Karuba, near Goma, where Kabila's soldiers reportedly carried out the May 29 shooting.
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NEWS
August 25, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At dawn, families by the hundreds rolled up their bed mats, folded their plastic tents, scraped the last of the morning cornmeal from their pots and moved to the road. Word spread among ever-growing numbers of Rwandan refugees: It was time to go home, finally. Then, on the roadside, they sat. All Thursday long. It was a brilliant day with sunshine and soft African breezes. But none of the refugees moved farther.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | Associated Press
Hutu militants forced hundreds of thousands of Rwandan refugees to abandon U.N. camps in northwestern Tanzania on Thursday and hide in nearby forests to avoid going home, aid workers said. Tanzania, which borders Rwanda, has the largest remaining population of Rwandan refugees--535,000 people--and says they all must leave by Dec. 31. By late Thursday, at least four huge camps--Lumasi, Kitali, Mushuhura and Benaco--that used to hold about 390,000 refugees were nearly empty.
NEWS
February 25, 1995 | Reuters
Thousands of Burundian and Rwandan refugees are fleeing fighting between troops and gunmen in Burundi and pouring into northwestern Tanzania, officials said Friday. The United Nations' refugee agency said 24,000 had entered Tanzania in the last week. Local government officials in Tanzania put the number at more than 30,000. Refugees reported that followers of an outlawed Hutu party were fighting a rear-guard action against the Tutsi-dominated army in northern Burundi.
NEWS
April 1, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woeful refugees of Rwanda are on the road again. And once more they are fleeing toward sanctuary where they are unwanted. Shambling on foot, some of their children already going lame, about 50,000 advanced Friday along a winding mountain highway of northernmost Burundi. The double-file exodus on either side of the road stretched for miles.
NEWS
August 25, 1994 | Associated Press
Rwandan refugees attacked a group of their countrymen who were attempting to return home Wednesday, forcing the United Nations to halt the repatriation, officials said. The incident came a day after five refugees were hacked to death for stealing in a refugee camp, said Ray Wilkinson, spokesman for the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. About 250 Rwandans set out from the Goma-area refugee camps but never made it out of Zaire.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | Associated Press
Hutu militants forced hundreds of thousands of Rwandan refugees to abandon U.N. camps in northwestern Tanzania on Thursday and hide in nearby forests to avoid going home, aid workers said. Tanzania, which borders Rwanda, has the largest remaining population of Rwandan refugees--535,000 people--and says they all must leave by Dec. 31. By late Thursday, at least four huge camps--Lumasi, Kitali, Mushuhura and Benaco--that used to hold about 390,000 refugees were nearly empty.
NEWS
June 4, 1997 | From Reuters
The U.N. refugee agency urged Congo President Laurent Kabila and other African leaders Tuesday to take steps to protect Rwandan refugees in the wake of the killing last week of an aid worker and four refugees in the eastern Congo. Spokeswoman Pam O'Toole said the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees is suspending its aid work at Karuba, near Goma, where Kabila's soldiers reportedly carried out the May 29 shooting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994 | SHELBY GRAD
Carol Patterson and other residents of the Harbor Health Care nursing home in Fullerton were so moved by the television pictures of suffering in Rwanda and Zaire that they decided to do something about it. This morning they will open a drop-off point for donations to the Rwandan relief effort. "We've been watching the pictures and talking about it. We wished we could do something," said Patterson, a retired Costa Mesa schoolteacher. "Here's an opportunity to help."
NEWS
March 19, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Targeting intimidation as the chief obstacle to repatriating Rwanda's refugees, five Central African leaders announced a new crackdown on thugs in refugee camps. Former President Jimmy Carter announced the measures as he closed a three-day summit convened to resolve Africa's most pressing crisis--the refusal of 1.7 million exiled Rwandans to return to a nation devastated by genocide in 1994.
NEWS
November 29, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was billed as a historic peace conference to try to avert a potential civil war and resolve the lingering plight of Rwanda's remaining million refugees. Except that the refugees themselves were not invited to the table to be heard. And the United Nations refugee agency, which has claimed to represent the refugees on past occasions, decided not to attend.
NEWS
August 30, 1995 | From Associated Press
Frustrated by the United Nations' inability to get more than 1.2 million Rwandan refugees to go home, Zaire said Tuesday that they will be forced to leave eastern Zaire if they do not go voluntarily by the end of the year. The policy was announced by Prime Minister Leon Kengo wa Dondo after he met for several hours with Sadako Ogata, the U.N. high commissioner for refugees. But the U.N. refugee agency dismissed the deadline, saying it cannot commit itself to a rigid time frame.
NEWS
August 26, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The United Nations regained jurisdiction over Rwanda's 1.2 million refugees Friday, but its plan to resume sending them home took off sluggishly. Even allowing time to smooth the rough spots, this week's sound and fury over resettlement of exiled ethnic Hutus has served to remind the nations of this Central African region, and the developed world, that peaceful resolution of this predicament could take a year--more likely years.
NEWS
August 25, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At dawn, families by the hundreds rolled up their bed mats, folded their plastic tents, scraped the last of the morning cornmeal from their pots and moved to the road. Word spread among ever-growing numbers of Rwandan refugees: It was time to go home, finally. Then, on the roadside, they sat. All Thursday long. It was a brilliant day with sunshine and soft African breezes. But none of the refugees moved farther.
NEWS
April 1, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The woeful refugees of Rwanda are on the road again. And once more they are fleeing toward sanctuary where they are unwanted. Shambling on foot, some of their children already going lame, about 50,000 advanced Friday along a winding mountain highway of northernmost Burundi. The double-file exodus on either side of the road stretched for miles.
NEWS
August 19, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mountain forests of Central Africa rise steeply from the banks of Lake Kivu at this remote, run-down resort town. The 200,000 or so residents here prefer to lift their eyes from the seedy streets and proclaim it the "green city." But now, under the unstoppable pressure of another Rwandan refugee migration, Bukavu is being reduced hour by hour to another squalid cesspool of misery.
NEWS
March 19, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Targeting intimidation as the chief obstacle to repatriating Rwanda's refugees, five Central African leaders announced a new crackdown on thugs in refugee camps. Former President Jimmy Carter announced the measures as he closed a three-day summit convened to resolve Africa's most pressing crisis--the refusal of 1.7 million exiled Rwandans to return to a nation devastated by genocide in 1994.
NEWS
February 25, 1995 | Reuters
Thousands of Burundian and Rwandan refugees are fleeing fighting between troops and gunmen in Burundi and pouring into northwestern Tanzania, officials said Friday. The United Nations' refugee agency said 24,000 had entered Tanzania in the last week. Local government officials in Tanzania put the number at more than 30,000. Refugees reported that followers of an outlawed Hutu party were fighting a rear-guard action against the Tutsi-dominated army in northern Burundi.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hutu zealots killed another Hutu refugee who had urged Rwandans to return home, continuing a deadly campaign of intimidation in Zaire's teeming refugee camps. The unidentified man was beaten and stoned to death Saturday in the Kitaku refugee camp, Ray Wilkinson, a spokesman for the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, said.
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