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NEWS
September 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
Rwanda and Zaire pledged Thursday to help an estimated 1.2 million Hutu refugees return to their homeland in Rwanda from wretched camps in eastern Zaire, and Zaire urged that they return by the end of this month. Filippo Grandi, the field chief for the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Goma, said it was "a big achievement" that both countries had agreed to work together.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1996
War, sadly an African staple, is becoming increasingly likely between Rwanda and Zaire as the ethnic conflict between Hutus and Tutsis threatens to destabilize the entire region and further endanger an estimated 500,000 refugees who can find neither food nor haven. Diplomatic efforts by the United Nations, which has sent in a Canadian envoy, and, more important, by the Organization of African Unity, which has sent a team, offer the best hope of peace.
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NEWS
April 13, 1995 | Associated Press
Raiders with assault rifles and grenades killed 31 people at a Rwandan refugee camp and on a Zairian island in Lake Kivu, a U.N. agency said Wednesday. Fifty-one people were wounded in the attacks, 10 seriously. Many were women and children housed in the camp on the western shore of the lake, which separates Rwanda and Zaire. U.N. officials said the first assault was on the Lake Kivu island of Iwinja, where the assailants killed two people and wounded five, apparently all Zairians.
NEWS
November 2, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of Central Africa's worst fighting since Rwanda's genocidal war two years ago erupted Friday as the Tutsi-led government army here exchanged fierce artillery fire with neighboring Zaire, sending thousands of panicked residents fleeing from both sides of the bitter combat.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | GABRIELLE GLASER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It is peaceful in the seminary, as it was through times of partition, before the Communists and after they fell, and when rigid economics was left behind on the bumpy road to a free market. The only sounds reaching the office are the gentle swish of long black robes as priests glide across the marble floor in sandals, and the chirping of swallows that inhabit lush inner courtyards thick with ferns, red petunias and lavender geraniums.
NEWS
November 2, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of Central Africa's worst fighting since Rwanda's genocidal war two years ago erupted Friday as the Tutsi-led government army here exchanged fierce artillery fire with neighboring Zaire, sending thousands of panicked residents fleeing from both sides of the bitter combat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 4, 1996
War, sadly an African staple, is becoming increasingly likely between Rwanda and Zaire as the ethnic conflict between Hutus and Tutsis threatens to destabilize the entire region and further endanger an estimated 500,000 refugees who can find neither food nor haven. Diplomatic efforts by the United Nations, which has sent in a Canadian envoy, and, more important, by the Organization of African Unity, which has sent a team, offer the best hope of peace.
NEWS
July 16, 1986 | United Press International
A summit of seven African leaders ended Tuesday with strong condemnation of South African apartheid and a swipe at the United States and other Western nations for refusing to join an economic blockade against Pretoria. A communique issued by the leaders from East and Central Africa said that equality for blacks in South Africa is a "historic imperative" and assailed governments that oppose economic sanctions and provide military aid despite Pretoria's racial discrimination policies.
NEWS
November 11, 1996 | Reuters
Zairian rebels have agreed to open a corridor for aid to more than 1 million Rwandan and Burundian refugees scattered by fighting in eastern Zaire, a U.N. official said Sunday. Omar Backhet, resident representative of the U.N. Development Program in Rwanda, said the first assessment teams to check on humanitarian needs and security will enter rebel-held territory today. Backhet spoke shortly after U.N.
NEWS
September 13, 1994
Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama's Cabinet gives final approval today to dispatching 480 Japanese troops on a humanitarian mission to aid refugees from Rwanda at two camps in Zaire. It would mark the fourth time since the end of World War II that Japan will have sent its troops overseas. The move underscored a commitment to get involved in foreign trouble spots. The government sent three missions to Rwanda and Zaire to study conditions there before making up its mind to dispatch troops.
NEWS
April 13, 1995 | Associated Press
Raiders with assault rifles and grenades killed 31 people at a Rwandan refugee camp and on a Zairian island in Lake Kivu, a U.N. agency said Wednesday. Fifty-one people were wounded in the attacks, 10 seriously. Many were women and children housed in the camp on the western shore of the lake, which separates Rwanda and Zaire. U.N. officials said the first assault was on the Lake Kivu island of Iwinja, where the assailants killed two people and wounded five, apparently all Zairians.
NEWS
September 2, 1994 | From Associated Press
Rwanda and Zaire pledged Thursday to help an estimated 1.2 million Hutu refugees return to their homeland in Rwanda from wretched camps in eastern Zaire, and Zaire urged that they return by the end of this month. Filippo Grandi, the field chief for the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Goma, said it was "a big achievement" that both countries had agreed to work together.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | GABRIELLE GLASER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It is peaceful in the seminary, as it was through times of partition, before the Communists and after they fell, and when rigid economics was left behind on the bumpy road to a free market. The only sounds reaching the office are the gentle swish of long black robes as priests glide across the marble floor in sandals, and the chirping of swallows that inhabit lush inner courtyards thick with ferns, red petunias and lavender geraniums.
MAGAZINE
June 12, 2005 | Leroy Sievers, Leroy Sievers is a former executive producer of "Nightline."
I sit outside the theater on the third street promenade in Santa Monica, dialing the same number over and over on my cellphone. "You have to come with me," I say to my friend and former "Nightline" colleague Rick Wilkinson. I demand. Then plead. "Please, I can't do this alone." We are talking about seeing a movie. "Hotel Rwanda." I am wondering if I can sit through it. Wondering if I will start sobbing the way I did in those cursed fields in Africa more than a decade ago.
TRAVEL
August 28, 1988
It is extraordinary that F. Woods would express dismay on behalf of his Toastmasters Travel Club regarding gorilla tracking (Readers' Letters, Aug. 14). Gorillas are indeed an endangered species; however, due to poachers, not organized tourism. It is only because of the efforts of Diane Fossey, her Digit Foundation, and the resulting controlled tourism that these magnificent animals have been spared extinction. As Roderick Mann's article (Aug. 7) pointed out, groups are limited to six people and very strict instructions are given on behavior, etc. Because of this limited tourism, for the first time ever, government officials of Rwanda and Zaire have taken an interest in their mountain gorillas and contributed to the effort to stop the horrendous poaching that is not only for frightful souvenirs (gorilla hands as ashtrays)
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