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OPINION
April 6, 2014 | By Jonathan Tepperman
KIGALI, Rwanda - Twenty years ago Monday, the state of Rwanda set about trying to hack itself out of existence. Starting on April 7, 1994, Hutu extremists, in a premeditated 100-day campaign, systematically butchered close to 1 million Tutsis - three-quarters of all those in the country - as well as moderate Hutus, driving countless more into exile. Yet two decades later, Rwanda is very much alive; indeed, in many respects, it's thriving. But it remains a confounding place. Visit the country today and you find a remarkably peaceful and well-ordered land.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Stephen Ceasar
As a boy, Patrick Manyika looked up and watched packages of corn and canned fish fall from the sky. An airplane streamed overhead, dropping supplies to the hundreds of refugees living in isolation in the rolling hills and forests of northeast Rwanda. The relief packages read "USAID" - it was the first word he would learn to read. Manyika lived as a child in exile on the land of a national park, survived the Rwandan genocide as a teenager and eventually made his way to a private university in Southern California.
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NATIONAL
March 16, 2012 | By Tina Susman
With the jury unable to reach a verdict, a judge has declared a mistrial in the case of a Rwandan-born woman who was charged with covering up her role in that country's 1994 genocide in order to obtain U.S. citizenship. The trial of Beatrice Munyenyezi in Concord, N.H., had been closely watched because she was only the second Rwandan immigrant to stand trial in the United States on charges of lying on immigration applications about whether they participated in the killings of more than half a million people in the central African nation.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - In scattered villages on steep green hillsides, many who killed their neighbors in Rwanda's genocide 20 years ago now live side by side with relatives of the dead. Speech that creates ethnic divisions has been outlawed. Local tribunals called gacaca courts have allowed many offenders to be released from prison in return for confessions and expressions of remorse. And a generation of young people who grew up after the mass killings embody the hope of a new breed of Rwandans who identify not by ethnicity but by nationality.
WORLD
December 20, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
A former Rwandan minister was sentenced Thursday to 35 years in jail for crimes tied to the nation's brutal genocide, including handing out machetes to a Hutu militia and spurring them to kill Tutsis. Witnesses described Augustin Ngirabatware as being tantamount to a god in the stretches of Rwanda where he exhorted members of a Hutu militia to wipe out Tutsis, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda said in its judgment. He was Rwanda's planning minister during the 1994 genocide, when hundreds of thousands of Tutsis and sympathetic Hutus were slain.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2013 | By Tina Susman
A year after her first trial ended without a verdict, a Rwandan-born woman was convicted by a second jury Thursday of lying about her role in Rwanda's 1994 genocide to gain entry to the United States. A judge immediately stripped 43-year-old Beatrice Munyenyezi of her citizenship, 10 years after she was granted it in the same Concord, N.H., courthouse where her two trials took place. Munyenyezi became the fourth member of her family to be convicted of crimes stemming from Rwanda's 1994 political turmoil and genocide, which left hundreds of thousands of people dead across the East African nation.
WORLD
November 17, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A U.N. appeals court overturned the conviction of the former Rwandan president's brother-in-law, who had been sentenced to 20 years for organizing a massacre that left about 1,000 dead during the 1994 genocide. The judge at the court in Arusha, Tanzania, said serious errors were committed in Protais Zigiranyirazo's 2008 conviction and sentencing and ordered him freed. Zigiranyirazo, 71, stood in disbelief. An estimated 800,000 ethnic Tutsis and politically moderate Hutus were killed in Rwanda's genocide, which began after President Juvenal Habyarimana's plane was brought down in April 1994.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - In scattered villages on steep green hillsides, many who killed their neighbors in Rwanda's genocide 20 years ago now live side by side with relatives of the dead. Speech that creates ethnic divisions has been outlawed. Local tribunals called gacaca courts have allowed many offenders to be released from prison in return for confessions and expressions of remorse. And a generation of young people who grew up after the mass killings embody the hope of a new breed of Rwandans who identify not by ethnicity but by nationality.
WORLD
December 20, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
GOMA, Congo - It was not the bullet lodged in the officer's gut, or the botched operation he'd had in a field hospital, that made the case so difficult for doctors in a Goma hospital. It was trying to save the life of a Rwandan officer injured in the recent Congolese battle for the eastern city when Rwanda's government insisted it wasn't involved in the Goma fighting. Doctors were convinced the officer would die if he wasn't sent home to Rwanda, where he could get better medical care.
NEWS
December 4, 1993 | Reuters
Eleven schoolchildren were killed and at least 30 wounded Friday when a mine baited with money exploded in the central Rwandan town of Remera, Rwandan radio reported. Children walking to school saw money on the road, scrambled to get it and triggered the mine. The bank note was attached to the mine by a string, the radio said. No one has claimed responsibility.
OPINION
April 6, 2014 | By Jonathan Tepperman
KIGALI, Rwanda - Twenty years ago Monday, the state of Rwanda set about trying to hack itself out of existence. Starting on April 7, 1994, Hutu extremists, in a premeditated 100-day campaign, systematically butchered close to 1 million Tutsis - three-quarters of all those in the country - as well as moderate Hutus, driving countless more into exile. Yet two decades later, Rwanda is very much alive; indeed, in many respects, it's thriving. But it remains a confounding place. Visit the country today and you find a remarkably peaceful and well-ordered land.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Times Film Critic
"Rising From Ashes" gives you more than you expect. Its story line is as positive and affirmative as the title indicates, but it turns out there are dramas going on in this documentary that you wouldn't initially suspect. Directed by T.C. Johnston and filmed over more than six years, "Ashes" tells the wildly improbable story of the Rwandan National Cycling Team, a.k.a. Team Rwanda, and a devoted American coach who says "they're terrified of me, and I wouldn't have it any other way. " The ashes of the title refers to the 1994 genocide in this African country, when Rwandans murdered one another at a horrific rate: As many as 1 million were killed over a roughly three-month period, which worked out to one person killed every 10 seconds for 100 days.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2013 | By Tina Susman
A year after her first trial ended without a verdict, a Rwandan-born woman was convicted by a second jury Thursday of lying about her role in Rwanda's 1994 genocide to gain entry to the United States. A judge immediately stripped 43-year-old Beatrice Munyenyezi of her citizenship, 10 years after she was granted it in the same Concord, N.H., courthouse where her two trials took place. Munyenyezi became the fourth member of her family to be convicted of crimes stemming from Rwanda's 1994 political turmoil and genocide, which left hundreds of thousands of people dead across the East African nation.
WORLD
January 1, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
In a bid to quell violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the United Nations Security Council imposed an arms embargo late Monday on two armed groups accused of rape and mass killings. The decision came just before Rwanda, which has been accused of backing the rebels, temporarily joined the powerful council. The country has fervently denied involvement in the Congo crisis, but U.N. experts and human rights groups say its fingerprints are evident in the recent bloodshed.
WORLD
December 20, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
A former Rwandan minister was sentenced Thursday to 35 years in jail for crimes tied to the nation's brutal genocide, including handing out machetes to a Hutu militia and spurring them to kill Tutsis. Witnesses described Augustin Ngirabatware as being tantamount to a god in the stretches of Rwanda where he exhorted members of a Hutu militia to wipe out Tutsis, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda said in its judgment. He was Rwanda's planning minister during the 1994 genocide, when hundreds of thousands of Tutsis and sympathetic Hutus were slain.
WORLD
December 20, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
GOMA, Congo - It was not the bullet lodged in the officer's gut, or the botched operation he'd had in a field hospital, that made the case so difficult for doctors in a Goma hospital. It was trying to save the life of a Rwandan officer injured in the recent Congolese battle for the eastern city when Rwanda's government insisted it wasn't involved in the Goma fighting. Doctors were convinced the officer would die if he wasn't sent home to Rwanda, where he could get better medical care.
WORLD
April 10, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
At least 90 women have been raped and 180 villagers killed in the last two months by rebels as well as government forces in volatile eastern Congo, according to Human Rights Watch. The group said it documented the rapes, killings and burning of dozens of villages by the rebel Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda. The mainly Rwandan force fled into Congo after orchestrating the 1994 genocide of an estimated 800,000 people. Their presence has been a major problem and in January, Congo allowed Rwandan troops to enter the country in a joint effort to root out the rebels.
NEWS
August 2, 1994
United Nations Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali meets today with ambassadors and aid specialists from U.N. states in a special, one-day appeal to raise money for the Rwandan refugee crisis. U.N. agencies and private humanitarian organizations say they need $435 million to cover the costs of coping with the displaced Rwandan population through the end of the year. Roughly half the country's 7 million people have fled an internal blood bath that began last April.
OPINION
December 15, 2012
Re "Congo rebels thrive on fear and chaos," Dec. 11 The article about the situation in Congo reveals the alarming truth about Rwanda's exploitation of eastern Congo's natural resources and the unspeakable sexual violence being committed against Congo's women. The Times was right to focus on the weak, corrupt and wholly ineffective Congolese government and on neighboring Rwanda and Uganda as the primary perpetrators in eastern Congo. What is not mentioned is the contributing role that the United States has played in the region.
SPORTS
August 28, 2012 | By Mark Medina
The humanity struck the Blake family through the simplest gestures. After writing to their sponsored child in Rwanda for the past three years, Lakers guard Steve Blake and his wife, Kristen, visited her in person. On their seven-day trip through Africa New Life Ministries , the Blakes saw everything. They witnessed poverty.  They saw the traces of genocide inflicted on this land 18 years ago. They sensed hope amid the destruction. They noticed how the Blakes' ties with sports, the Lakers, and their Christian faith cemented a bond with the community.
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