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Rwandan Genocide

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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2007 | Susan King
"Beyond the Gates," which opens Friday, chronicles the first five days of the horrific 1994 Rwandan genocide in which extremists from the Hutus, the country's majority tribe, went on an ethnic-cleansing rampage, turning machetes and machine guns on the minority Tutsis. When the violence broke out, some Tutsis and moderate Hutus took refuge at the Ecole Technique Officielle in Kigali. The secondary school was also the base camp for U.N. peacekeepers from Belgium.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 2014 | By Stephen Ceasar
As a boy, Patrick Manyika looked up and watched packages of corn and canned fish fall from the sky. An airplane streamed overhead, dropping supplies to the hundreds of refugees living in isolation in the rolling hills and forests of northeast Rwanda. The relief packages read "USAID" - it was the first word he would learn to read. Manyika lived as a child in exile on the land of a national park, survived the Rwandan genocide as a teenager and eventually made his way to a private university in Southern California.
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NEWS
August 21, 1999 | Reuters
A Roman Catholic bishop was charged Friday with helping to organize a 1994 Rwandan genocide and with murdering a dozen children. Bishop Augustin Misago did not enter a plea, and the trial was quickly suspended to allow the Kigali Criminal Court to consider complaints made by the defense. Misago, 56, was arrested in April on suspicion of playing a role in the 1994 slaughter of more than 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - In scattered villages on steep green hillsides, many who killed their neighbors in Rwanda's genocide 20 years ago now live side by side with relatives of the dead. Speech that creates ethnic divisions has been outlawed. Local tribunals called gacaca courts have allowed many offenders to be released from prison in return for confessions and expressions of remorse. And a generation of young people who grew up after the mass killings embody the hope of a new breed of Rwandans who identify not by ethnicity but by nationality.
NEWS
June 22, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Two former Rwandan mayors suspected of helping organize the 1994 Rwandan genocide have been arrested in a Tanzanian refugee camp, sources said. Kingsley Moghalu, a spokesman for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in Arusha, Tanzania, confirmed that Sylvestre Gacumbitsi, the former mayor of Rusumo, was arrested. But Moghalu declined to confirm the arrest of the former mayor of Rukara, Jean Mpambara.
WORLD
January 10, 2004 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Nearly 10 years after the Rwandan genocide, a Hollywood studio is planning a film, touted as a love story and political thriller about the massacres. The aim, says director Terry George, is to reproach the world for its failure to stop the 1994 Hutu genocide of 800,000 people, mostly Tutsis, in 100 days. Moderate Hutus who refused to take part were also slaughtered. "I'm particularly determined to shame everybody in the audience if I possibly can," George said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1999 | ROGER WINTER, Roger Winter is the executive director of U.S. Committee for Refugees
A year ago, President Clinton traveled to Rwanda, where he acknowledged what I believe is the greatest moral failure of his administration. In a brief stopover at Kigali airport, during which the engines of Air Force One were never shut down, Clinton bit his lip in the mask of contrition that Americans have grown so familiar with during the last year.
OPINION
November 13, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Most bio-pics are made about somebodies - warriors, kings, artists. This was a bio-pic about a nobody who became a somebody during the Rwandan genocide, a bloody crossroads for a country with deep-seated ethnic frictions. In April 1994, Paul Rusesabagina was brevetted as general manager of the luxury hotel where he worked, and where more than 1,000 people had fled from the killing rampage. For more than two months, he managed to protect them from being slaughtered. Ten years later, the world saw "Hotel Rwanda.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - In scattered villages on steep green hillsides, many who killed their neighbors in Rwanda's genocide 20 years ago now live side by side with relatives of the dead. Speech that creates ethnic divisions has been outlawed. Local tribunals called gacaca courts have allowed many offenders to be released from prison in return for confessions and expressions of remorse. And a generation of young people who grew up after the mass killings embody the hope of a new breed of Rwandans who identify not by ethnicity but by nationality.
WORLD
March 14, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
A United Nations tribunal has extended the sentence of a priest to life in prison after upholding his war crimes conviction for ordering militiamen to burn and bulldoze a church with 1,500 people inside during the 1994 Rwandan genocide. The ruling by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda came after Roman Catholic priest Athanase Seromba appealed his 2006 conviction, said a statement on the tribunal's website. He was originally sentenced to 15 years in prison. Hutu extremists killed more than 500,000 minority Tutsis and moderate Hutus in 1994.
WORLD
February 25, 2014 | By Lalita Clozel
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State John F. Kerry announced on Tuesday a ban against issuing U.S. visas to foreigners implicated in wartime sexual violence. “No one at the highest level of military or governance who has presided over, or engaged in, or knew of, or adopted these kinds of attacks is ever going to receive a visa to travel into the United States of America from this day forward,” Kerry said during talks with his British counterpart, William Hague. Hague applauded the announcement.
OPINION
November 13, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Most bio-pics are made about somebodies - warriors, kings, artists. This was a bio-pic about a nobody who became a somebody during the Rwandan genocide, a bloody crossroads for a country with deep-seated ethnic frictions. In April 1994, Paul Rusesabagina was brevetted as general manager of the luxury hotel where he worked, and where more than 1,000 people had fled from the killing rampage. For more than two months, he managed to protect them from being slaughtered. Ten years later, the world saw "Hotel Rwanda.
OPINION
December 15, 2012
Re "Congo rebels thrive on fear and chaos," Dec. 11 The article about the situation in Congo reveals the alarming truth about Rwanda's exploitation of eastern Congo's natural resources and the unspeakable sexual violence being committed against Congo's women. The Times was right to focus on the weak, corrupt and wholly ineffective Congolese government and on neighboring Rwanda and Uganda as the primary perpetrators in eastern Congo. What is not mentioned is the contributing role that the United States has played in the region.
WORLD
December 11, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon
Los Angeles Times RUTSHURU, Democratic Republic of Congo - The rebels materialized out of the moist, heavy air, startling the woman as she tended her crops in the lush volcanic hills near the Rwandan border. They wanted a bag of salt. No salt, and they'd kill her. "You just do what they say," said Solange, a widow struggling to support a family in the midst of war. To people like her who live in eastern Congo's North Kivu province, the M23 fighters who have taken control of their region are bandits, not rebels.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Dramatic works about Afghanistan, such as Tony Kushner's "Homebody/Kabul" and the more recent multi-authored bill of plays "The Great Game: Afghanistan" tend toward marathon lengths, as though no account of the country's perennially turbulent history could be dispatched in the standard two hours of stage traffic. "Blood and Gifts," J.T. Rogers' sharp theatrical survey of America's covert involvement in the Soviet-Afghan war, is economical by comparison, running just a little over 2 1/2 hours.
NATIONAL
May 8, 2012 | By Tina Susman
A Rwandan woman living in Boston has been convicted of immigration fraud for concealing her membership in Rwanda's ruling party during that country's 1994 genocide so that she could gain entry to the United States. Her sister faces similar charges in New Hampshire. The trial of Prudence Kantengwa, 47, concluded in a Boston courtroom Monday. Meanwhile, her sister, Beatrice Munyenyezi , is in a New Hampshire jail waiting for her second trial on immigration fraud charges to begin.
OPINION
December 7, 2010 | Jonah Goldberg
If North Koreans were pandas, would we have let them suffer so? In October 1993, Edward N. Luttwak wrote a brilliant essay for Commentary magazine asking a similar question: "If the Bosnian Muslims had been bottlenose dolphins, would the world have allowed Croats and Serbs to slaughter them by the tens of thousands? If Sarajevo had been an Amazonian rain forest or merely an American wood containing spotted owls, would the Serbs have been allowed to blast it and burn it with their artillery fire?
NATIONAL
February 14, 2009 | Bob Drogin
If tragedy brings people together, the still-unexplained crash of a Continental Airlines commuter jet Thursday night forever links Beverly Eckert and Alison Des Forges, two extraordinary women who led separate crusades, against seemingly impossible odds. Eckert was a Sept. 11 widow who turned her grief into powerful advocacy.
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