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Rwandan Patriotic Front

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WORLD
August 8, 2010 | By Nick Wadhams, Los Angeles Times
The New Sombrero bar, with its plastic chairs, pastel blue walls and dark corners, used to buzz with students in this university town in southern Rwanda. But the place has been nearly empty since its owner was killed last month. The problem isn't that people feel uneasy visiting a bar belonging to a dead man. It's that Andre Kagwa Rwisereka was the vice president of the opposition Democratic Green Party, and people worry that coming to the New Sombrero would be seen as a sign of support for the party.
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WORLD
August 19, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
Issa Munyangaju is willing to tell his story, but he requires a beer. He sips a Primus in a dim concrete bar and talks about the houseboy he shot during the genocide. They were friends, he says, until they came to a roadblock manned by Hutu militiamen. They gave Munyangaju, also Hutu, a gun. They told him he would be killed if he didn't execute his friend, whose ethnic group, the Tutsis, had been targeted for extermination. "I followed their orders," Munyangaju, 44, says. He put a bullet in the young man's stomach, and was within earshot when another shot finished him off. While he was in prison, government officials visited to tout the benefits of confessing at a type of trial known as gacaca (pronounced ga-CHA-cha)
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NEWS
April 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A former rebel leader whose forces stopped the 1994 genocide in Rwanda was chosen president Monday, becoming the nation's first Tutsi leader since it won independence from Belgium in 1962. Emerging as the formal head of a country he has controlled as vice president and defense minister for six years, Paul Kagame, 43, was selected by the parliament and the Cabinet in an 81-5 secret ballot. He had previously declined the presidency for fear of antagonizing the nation's 85% Hutu majority.
WORLD
August 8, 2010 | By Nick Wadhams, Los Angeles Times
The New Sombrero bar, with its plastic chairs, pastel blue walls and dark corners, used to buzz with students in this university town in southern Rwanda. But the place has been nearly empty since its owner was killed last month. The problem isn't that people feel uneasy visiting a bar belonging to a dead man. It's that Andre Kagwa Rwisereka was the vice president of the opposition Democratic Green Party, and people worry that coming to the New Sombrero would be seen as a sign of support for the party.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | Times Wire Services
Rwanda's rebel commander said Tuesday that his Rwandan Patriotic Front will form a government within days, to be followed by a cease-fire. French officers said France had won an endorsement from the rebels for a limited "humanitarian security zone" in southwestern Rwanda. The tentative agreement appeared to avert any immediate risk of a clash with the Tutsi-led rebels.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | From Associated Press
Hutu death squads came to Gatete settlement in April 1994 to kill "Tutsi cockroaches." Speciosa Mukasine was digging radishes in the terraced fields when she heard the screams of her family being slaughtered by the militiamen and some of her Hutu neighbors. She hid in the jungle to escape. Mukasine, a younger sister and a cousin were the lone Tutsi survivors in their extended family of more than 20.
NEWS
May 25, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of them are only boys, 14 or 15 years old, wearing sheepish grins and raggedy uniforms that make them appear no more threatening than toy soldiers. They smile easily, but the smile does not reach their eyes. Already these boys are wartime veterans, warriors who have no rank, collect no pay and travel on foot, lugging an odd assortment of French, Belgian and Soviet weapons. They sleep on the ground, stuff bullets in their pockets and have not yet learned to salute or field-strip a rifle.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior international relief agency leader Monday blamed the new Rwandan government for harassing refugees and pushing them toward another mass stampede out of the country. The official spoke out after weeks of what he described as frustration and double-speak in dealing with the new Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) government. But he insisted that he and his organization not be identified for fear its relief efforts would be compromised.
NEWS
July 5, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
Rebel troops overran Rwanda's capital and consolidated their hold on its second-largest city Monday, prompting French forces to declare the shrinking government-held pocket in the southwest a safe area under French protection.
WORLD
August 19, 2011 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
Issa Munyangaju is willing to tell his story, but he requires a beer. He sips a Primus in a dim concrete bar and talks about the houseboy he shot during the genocide. They were friends, he says, until they came to a roadblock manned by Hutu militiamen. They gave Munyangaju, also Hutu, a gun. They told him he would be killed if he didn't execute his friend, whose ethnic group, the Tutsis, had been targeted for extermination. "I followed their orders," Munyangaju, 44, says. He put a bullet in the young man's stomach, and was within earshot when another shot finished him off. While he was in prison, government officials visited to tout the benefits of confessing at a type of trial known as gacaca (pronounced ga-CHA-cha)
NEWS
April 18, 2000 | From Times Wire Services
A former rebel leader whose forces stopped the 1994 genocide in Rwanda was chosen president Monday, becoming the nation's first Tutsi leader since it won independence from Belgium in 1962. Emerging as the formal head of a country he has controlled as vice president and defense minister for six years, Paul Kagame, 43, was selected by the parliament and the Cabinet in an 81-5 secret ballot. He had previously declined the presidency for fear of antagonizing the nation's 85% Hutu majority.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | From Associated Press
Hutu death squads came to Gatete settlement in April 1994 to kill "Tutsi cockroaches." Speciosa Mukasine was digging radishes in the terraced fields when she heard the screams of her family being slaughtered by the militiamen and some of her Hutu neighbors. She hid in the jungle to escape. Mukasine, a younger sister and a cousin were the lone Tutsi survivors in their extended family of more than 20.
NEWS
August 16, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A senior international relief agency leader Monday blamed the new Rwandan government for harassing refugees and pushing them toward another mass stampede out of the country. The official spoke out after weeks of what he described as frustration and double-speak in dealing with the new Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) government. But he insisted that he and his organization not be identified for fear its relief efforts would be compromised.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | Times Wire Services
Rwanda's rebel commander said Tuesday that his Rwandan Patriotic Front will form a government within days, to be followed by a cease-fire. French officers said France had won an endorsement from the rebels for a limited "humanitarian security zone" in southwestern Rwanda. The tentative agreement appeared to avert any immediate risk of a clash with the Tutsi-led rebels.
NEWS
July 5, 1994 | From Times Wire Services
Rebel troops overran Rwanda's capital and consolidated their hold on its second-largest city Monday, prompting French forces to declare the shrinking government-held pocket in the southwest a safe area under French protection.
NEWS
May 25, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some of them are only boys, 14 or 15 years old, wearing sheepish grins and raggedy uniforms that make them appear no more threatening than toy soldiers. They smile easily, but the smile does not reach their eyes. Already these boys are wartime veterans, warriors who have no rank, collect no pay and travel on foot, lugging an odd assortment of French, Belgian and Soviet weapons. They sleep on the ground, stuff bullets in their pockets and have not yet learned to salute or field-strip a rifle.
NEWS
November 28, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Authorities expelled 37 Rwandan Hutu refugees, handing them over to soldiers of the Tutsi-dominated Rwandan Patriotic Front in what an official called a crackdown on crime in the border town of Goma. U.N. officials said the expulsions violated international law. Aid workers said the Zairians were becoming more aggressive about problems in the refugee camps.
NEWS
April 28, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A Rwandan court acquitted a former official charged in the 1994 genocide of more than 800,000 people, state-run Radio Rwanda reported. The criminal court in Kibuye, west of Kigali, the capital, cleared former Deputy Gov. Ignace Banyaga of charges that he helped kill thousands of minority Tutsis seeking shelter at a local church and a stadium in April 1994.
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