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NEWS
April 4, 1994 | Associated Press
More than 850,000 people in Rwanda--about one of every eight people in the country--urgently need food to prevent starvation because of drought, a new report says. The report, prepared by aid agencies, including Oxfam, said the 854,873 needy were scattered in seven regions in the tiny central African nation.
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OPINION
April 6, 2014 | By Jonathan Tepperman
KIGALI, Rwanda - Twenty years ago Monday, the state of Rwanda set about trying to hack itself out of existence. Starting on April 7, 1994, Hutu extremists, in a premeditated 100-day campaign, systematically butchered close to 1 million Tutsis - three-quarters of all those in the country - as well as moderate Hutus, driving countless more into exile. Yet two decades later, Rwanda is very much alive; indeed, in many respects, it's thriving. But it remains a confounding place. Visit the country today and you find a remarkably peaceful and well-ordered land.
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NEWS
January 28, 2000 | Associated Press
A U.N. tribunal found a former Rwandan tea factory manager guilty Thursday of three genocide-related charges, including rape, and sentenced him to life in prison. Alfred Musema is the first private citizen tried and convicted by the tribunal, which is prosecuting chief architects and perpetrators of the 1994 genocide of more than 800,000 minority Tutsis and politically moderate Hutus. The three-judge panel found Musema, 50, guilty on one count each of rape, genocide and crimes against humanity.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Times Film Critic
"Rising From Ashes" gives you more than you expect. Its story line is as positive and affirmative as the title indicates, but it turns out there are dramas going on in this documentary that you wouldn't initially suspect. Directed by T.C. Johnston and filmed over more than six years, "Ashes" tells the wildly improbable story of the Rwandan National Cycling Team, a.k.a. Team Rwanda, and a devoted American coach who says "they're terrified of me, and I wouldn't have it any other way. " The ashes of the title refers to the 1994 genocide in this African country, when Rwandans murdered one another at a horrific rate: As many as 1 million were killed over a roughly three-month period, which worked out to one person killed every 10 seconds for 100 days.
WORLD
April 5, 2004 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Evariste Ahimana can't even utter the word "one" to tell how many people he killed in Rwanda's genocide. He just holds up a finger to represent what he did -- clubbing a neighbor named Augustin Murinda, whom he liked and often drank with -- at the behest of strangers from the next village. Since returning to this village after his release from prison last year, Ahimana has walked past the house of his victim's brother every week as he climbed the hill to the church.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Times Film Critic
"Rising From Ashes" gives you more than you expect. Its story line is as positive and affirmative as the title indicates, but it turns out there are dramas going on in this documentary that you wouldn't initially suspect. Directed by T.C. Johnston and filmed over more than six years, "Ashes" tells the wildly improbable story of the Rwandan National Cycling Team, a.k.a. Team Rwanda, and a devoted American coach who says "they're terrified of me, and I wouldn't have it any other way. " The ashes of the title refers to the 1994 genocide in this African country, when Rwandans murdered one another at a horrific rate: As many as 1 million were killed over a roughly three-month period, which worked out to one person killed every 10 seconds for 100 days.
NEWS
June 21, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Rwanda announced the arrest of a journalist who allegedly led a radio hate campaign that helped fuel the 1994 genocide in which an estimated 800,000 people were slaughtered. "Valerie Bemeriki was arrested in northwest Rwanda late last week. She will be prosecuted for genocide and crimes against humanity," Justice Minister Jean de Dieu Mucyo said.
NEWS
March 5, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The brutal killing of eight foreign tourists in Uganda this week was just the latest horror in a conflict that in five years has given birth to a genocide in Rwanda and two wars in neighboring Congo. The attack serves as a tragic wake-up call to a world that may have doubted the seriousness of the threat posed by Hutu rebels who have been waging a terror campaign in Africa's Great Lakes region, Rwandan government officials said.
NEWS
March 3, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eight adventure tourists in Uganda, including an American couple, were killed by their Rwandan captors in the rain forest made famous by "Gorillas in the Mist," and a survivor said Tuesday that the rebels hacked some victims to death with machetes. In Washington, State Department spokesman James Foley called the Monday attack "about as abominable a crime as one can imagine--hostage-taking [and] coldblooded murder of hostages." Four Britons and two New Zealanders were also killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 1994
I would like to commend John Balzar for "Children Left by the Wayside" (Aug. 10). Not only did he report the news, but he described the emotions he and others felt when seeing these children and their suffering. His words brought tears to my eyes. I truly admire all the reporters who have the fortitude to report what they are seeing. I agree with Balzar that this reporting is not exploitation but rather a humanitarian need so the rest of the world can see the result of war. It may even aid in eventually rescuing these children through repatriation or through their adoption by those in other areas who have so much love to give.
NATIONAL
February 21, 2013 | By Tina Susman
A year after her first trial ended without a verdict, a Rwandan-born woman was convicted by a second jury Thursday of lying about her role in Rwanda's 1994 genocide to gain entry to the United States. A judge immediately stripped 43-year-old Beatrice Munyenyezi of her citizenship, 10 years after she was granted it in the same Concord, N.H., courthouse where her two trials took place. Munyenyezi became the fourth member of her family to be convicted of crimes stemming from Rwanda's 1994 political turmoil and genocide, which left hundreds of thousands of people dead across the East African nation.
WORLD
December 20, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
A former Rwandan minister was sentenced Thursday to 35 years in jail for crimes tied to the nation's brutal genocide, including handing out machetes to a Hutu militia and spurring them to kill Tutsis. Witnesses described Augustin Ngirabatware as being tantamount to a god in the stretches of Rwanda where he exhorted members of a Hutu militia to wipe out Tutsis, the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda said in its judgment. He was Rwanda's planning minister during the 1994 genocide, when hundreds of thousands of Tutsis and sympathetic Hutus were slain.
WORLD
December 20, 2012 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
GOMA, Congo - It was not the bullet lodged in the officer's gut, or the botched operation he'd had in a field hospital, that made the case so difficult for doctors in a Goma hospital. It was trying to save the life of a Rwandan officer injured in the recent Congolese battle for the eastern city when Rwanda's government insisted it wasn't involved in the Goma fighting. Doctors were convinced the officer would die if he wasn't sent home to Rwanda, where he could get better medical care.
NATIONAL
March 16, 2012 | By Tina Susman
With the jury unable to reach a verdict, a judge has declared a mistrial in the case of a Rwandan-born woman who was charged with covering up her role in that country's 1994 genocide in order to obtain U.S. citizenship. The trial of Beatrice Munyenyezi in Concord, N.H., had been closely watched because she was only the second Rwandan immigrant to stand trial in the United States on charges of lying on immigration applications about whether they participated in the killings of more than half a million people in the central African nation.
WORLD
September 9, 2010 | By Robyn Dixon, Los Angeles Times
U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Wednesday pressed Rwanda to keep its forces serving on peacekeeping missions despite its anger over a draft report accusing the African nation's troops of atrocities and possible genocide in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The government of Rwandan President Paul Kagame has threatened to pull 3,500 troops from U.N. operations in the Darfur region of Sudan because of its outrage over the world body's draft report, which was leaked recently to the French newspaper Le Monde.
WORLD
August 8, 2010 | By Nick Wadhams, Los Angeles Times
The New Sombrero bar, with its plastic chairs, pastel blue walls and dark corners, used to buzz with students in this university town in southern Rwanda. But the place has been nearly empty since its owner was killed last month. The problem isn't that people feel uneasy visiting a bar belonging to a dead man. It's that Andre Kagwa Rwisereka was the vice president of the opposition Democratic Green Party, and people worry that coming to the New Sombrero would be seen as a sign of support for the party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 1997
In response to Constance Hilliard (Commentary, Feb. 9), who tells us that we should feel connected through shared history to the Rwandan massacres, I say that the blood bath that occurred there is a human aberration. You don't systematically butcher 1 million people (mostly neighbors killing neighbors) within the space of a year and call it normal. Even today, when the killers are beginning to be prosecuted for what they did, Time magazine reports that officials are only going after those who killed 50 or more.
NEWS
April 21, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A United Nations plan to repatriate Rwandan Hutu refugees, already delayed by logistics problems, disease and local opposition, was further postponed until at least May. Yagi Sitolo, governor of the eastern Upper Zaire province, said the repatriation should not start until May 5 because of a cholera epidemic. Sitolo intervened last week to delay a plan to start an airlift this weekend of up to 100,000 Rwandan Hutu refugees from two camps south of Kisangani in eastern Zaire.
WORLD
November 17, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A U.N. appeals court overturned the conviction of the former Rwandan president's brother-in-law, who had been sentenced to 20 years for organizing a massacre that left about 1,000 dead during the 1994 genocide. The judge at the court in Arusha, Tanzania, said serious errors were committed in Protais Zigiranyirazo's 2008 conviction and sentencing and ordered him freed. Zigiranyirazo, 71, stood in disbelief. An estimated 800,000 ethnic Tutsis and politically moderate Hutus were killed in Rwanda's genocide, which began after President Juvenal Habyarimana's plane was brought down in April 1994.
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