Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRwandans Zaire
IN THE NEWS

Rwandans Zaire

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 26, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 85,000 Rwandan refugees have vanished mysteriously from two camps in eastern Zaire, raising fears that they have been killed or sent on a death march that could begin a new chapter of genocide in Central Africa, aid officials said Friday. "There was a departure in panic," said Paul Stromberg, a spokesman for the U.N. refugee agency in the eastern city of Kisangani, where he was interviewed by telephone.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 26, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 85,000 Rwandan refugees have vanished mysteriously from two camps in eastern Zaire, raising fears that they have been killed or sent on a death march that could begin a new chapter of genocide in Central Africa, aid officials said Friday. "There was a departure in panic," said Paul Stromberg, a spokesman for the U.N. refugee agency in the eastern city of Kisangani, where he was interviewed by telephone.
Advertisement
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
There was no room but still they came Friday, a barely moving mass of humanity abandoned by the government army and terrified of the rebel forces advancing across western Rwanda. With crossing gates into Zaire thrown open, it was impossible to count how many Hutu refugees had arrived in two days. But it likely was well over 500,000, making it one of the largest flights in history. Friday's arrivals found most space already taken.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One camp is in a sports center, the other in a rocky field. Each is swamped with sick and dying Rwandans. And both received desperately needed medical help from the outside world Wednesday. There the similarities end. The Goma Cercle Sportif houses 2,400 ill and wounded soldiers, officers and political agents of the former Rwandan army, a force accused of widespread atrocities as it fought and lost a civil war to prop up a murderous regime. Down the road, the S.O.S.
NEWS
July 28, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One camp is in a sports center, the other in a rocky field. Each is swamped with sick and dying Rwandans. And both received desperately needed medical help from the outside world Wednesday. There the similarities end. The Goma Cercle Sportif houses 2,400 ill and wounded soldiers, officers and political agents of the former Rwandan army, a force accused of widespread atrocities as it fought and lost a civil war to prop up a murderous regime. Down the road, the S.O.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 1994 | DARYL KELLEY
After a slow start, the Ventura County chapter of the American Red Cross has raised more than $4,000 since July 20 in relief funds for Rwandan refugees. Brian E. Bolton, chapter executive director, said that donations have stepped up since world attention began to focus last month in the flight of more than 1 million Rwandans into Zaire. "We only received one donation of $40 until July 20," Bolton said. The chapter made its first Rwandan aid request May 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1995 | MARY JANE MARCUS, Mary Jane Marcus of Palo Alto spent July through November last year in a refugee camp on the Rwanda-Tanzania border.
It has been more than six months since the international community first came to the aid of the Rwandan refugees. Where do we stand today? Contrary to what President Clinton said in his State of the Union address, the Rwandan relief effort was not a success. Although the immediate nutritional and medical needs of the refugees were met, the money the international community provided (and continues to provide) for the humanitarian crisis has left a political mess.
NEWS
July 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
There was no room but still they came Friday, a barely moving mass of humanity abandoned by the government army and terrified of the rebel forces advancing across western Rwanda. With crossing gates into Zaire thrown open, it was impossible to count how many Hutu refugees had arrived in two days. But it likely was well over 500,000, making it one of the largest flights in history. Friday's arrivals found most space already taken.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|