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Ryan C Crocker

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NATIONAL
November 20, 2007 | From Times Wire Reports
The State Department filled all its vacant positions for the U.S. Embassy in Iraq next year and won't have to force members of the Foreign Service to take the jobs. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and other top officials settled on personnel for 252 open positions, State Department spokesman Sean McCormack said. Rice consulted with U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Ryan C. Crocker and Foreign Service Director General Harry K. Thomas, McCormack said.
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OPINION
January 9, 2007
ZALMAY KHALILZAD is not the kind of soft-spoken diplomat who goes over well at the United Nations. President Bush's choice for U.S. ambassador to the U.N., dubbed "the viceroy" during his stint as ambassador to Afghanistan from 2003 to 2005, is a neoconservative hawk known for his autocratic style. Yet he is also charismatic and can be charming; certainly compared to his predecessor, he's a breath of fresh air. Former Ambassador John R. Bolton was a spectacularly poor choice for the U.N.
OPINION
May 31, 2007
LAME-DUCK PRESIDENTS from the right or left tend to edge toward the center in their waning years of office, but the ideological changes gripping George W. Bush seem nearly as profound as a religious conversion. Not only is his administration openly negotiating with North Korea and Iran, once derided as pillars of his "axis of evil," but he seems to be valuing professionalism and competence at least as much as loyalty in his appointees. Bush's choice of Robert B.
WORLD
April 1, 2007 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
As people flocked Saturday to a hospital in a Shiite Muslim district of the capital to visit loved ones injured in recent attacks, a car bomb tore through the crowd of well-wishers, killing five people and wounding two dozen others. Bombings, including the deadliest such attack of the 4-year-old war, have killed hundreds of people in Shiite areas across Iraq over the last week. U.S.
WORLD
November 29, 2007 | Ann M. Simmons, Times Staff Writer
Dozens of Iraqi lawmakers walked out of parliament Wednesday to protest what they view as overly aggressive and humiliating treatment by U.S. soldiers as representatives enter Baghdad's heavily fortified Green Zone, where the legislature is located. "I and many of my colleagues who live outside the Green Zone face a lot of problems," said Feryad Rawandozi, a high-ranking official with the Kurdish parliamentary bloc. U.S.
NATIONAL
September 13, 2007 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
One speech was famously delivered on an aircraft carrier in front of a "Mission Accomplished" banner. In another, he acknowledged the previous year in Iraq had not turned out well. Frequently, he has stressed the theme that the United States must fight terrorists in Iraq, or "they will not leave us alone." In more than half a dozen speeches to the nation about Iraq, President Bush has presented his case for the now more than 4-year-old war. His emphasis has shifted as conditions have changed.
NATIONAL
September 14, 2007 | Doyle McManus, Times Staff Writer
For more than four years since the invasion of Iraq, President Bush most often has defined his objective there with a single, stirring word: "Victory." "Victory in Iraq is vital for the United States of America," he told cadets at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in May. "Victory in this struggle will require more patience, more courage and more sacrifice," he warned National Guardsmen in West Virginia in July. But this week, the word "victory" disappeared from the president's lexicon.
NATIONAL
August 31, 2007 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
The Iraqi National Police will need an overhaul to rid the ranks of sectarian bias, according to an assessment of the Iraqi security forces to be released next week. The report -- commissioned by Congress and headed by retired Marine Gen. James L. Jones -- gives relatively good marks to the Iraqi army, according to an administration official briefed on the report. It says the army has been well-equipped and -trained and is now conducting operations effectively, the official said.
NATIONAL
April 13, 2008 | Julian E. Barnes, Times Staff Writer
For President Bush, creating a peaceful democracy remains the overarching U.S. goal in Iraq. Last week, he again described his vision for a "stable democracy" that can "promote our common interests in the Middle East." But in two days of exhaustive testimony before the House and Senate, the top U.S. commander in Iraq said conspicuously little about democracy in that nation. That's because, without saying so publicly, U.S. war planners have moved further from those idealistic goals.
NATIONAL
August 1, 2007 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
The White House's nominee to head the Joint Chiefs of Staff told a Senate panel Tuesday that the U.S. troop buildup in Iraq was beginning to improve security, but the Iraqi central government was making little headway toward the political reconciliation that is key to stabilizing the country. Adm. Michael G. Mullen, currently chief of naval operations, said that since the troop buildup began this year, security was "better -- not great, but better."
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