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Ryan Capital Management

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BUSINESS
June 5, 1998 | WALTER HAMILTON
Do you have a spare $250,000 and a penchant for high-octane growth stocks? If so, David Ryan, a former top aide to Investor's Business Daily newspaper founder William O'Neil, may have a hedge fund for you. Ryan, 39, recently left his mentor's namesake company, William O'Neil & Co. in West Los Angeles, after 16 years. He plans to open Ryan Capital Management in Santa Monica on July 1.
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BUSINESS
March 21, 2000 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many technical analysts hunting for breakout candidates among stocks say there isn't much they'd buy at the moment. As the Nasdaq Stock Market has faltered in the past week, many stocks that had been leading the market--particularly small-cap and mid-cap technology stocks--have been hit hard. "Everything that was setting up [recently] and that broke out ended up failing," hedge-fund manager Greg Kuhn said. Of course, some "old economy" stocks have suddenly rebounded over the last week.
BUSINESS
September 18, 1998 | WALTER HAMILTON
When should you sell a stock? If you're bargain hunting in today's dicey market, the answer is sooner rather than later--that is, if the stock moves against you. The market's summer plunge has made for some good buying opportunities. But it has also made for a risky investment climate in which it's easy to lose money quickly, experts note.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1998 | WALTER HAMILTON
Do you have a spare $250,000 and a penchant for high-octane growth stocks? If so, David Ryan, a former top aide to Investor's Business Daily newspaper founder William O'Neil, may have a hedge fund for you. Ryan, 39, recently left his mentor's namesake company, William O'Neil & Co. in West Los Angeles, after 16 years. He plans to open Ryan Capital Management in Santa Monica on July 1.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1998 | WALTER HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're an individual investor who's tempted to dive into stocks after watching the market surge to new highs on Monday, the first thing you should do is take a long, deep breath. Rather than rush in at what could be the tail end of a sharp advance, experts say investors should first ask themselves why they'd want to buy now. Specifically, are you a long-term investor who believes that the economic outlook for 1999 and beyond fully justifies a rising stock market?
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