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Ryan Coogler

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OPINION
July 17, 2013 | Patt Morrison
The California kid whose first full-length feature film wowed the judges at Sundance and Cannes this year is now showing it off to the world. "Fruitvale Station," about Oscar Grant, the young black man shot and killed by a transit police officer in Oakland on New Year's Day 2009, opens nationwide a week from Friday. Ryan Coogler has been moonlighting as a youth counselor at San Francisco's Juvenile Justice Center (where his dad works), but now his time is at a premium. Coogler's path from football star to filmmaker has people not only talking about his Oscar Grant film but about Oscar, period.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- At the start of Monday night's IFP Gotham Independent Awards, host Nick Kroll made an inside "Inside Llewyn Davis" joke.  "A common theme in this year's movies," the comedian said, "are the horrors we inflict upon one another -- slavery, war, folk music. " A few hours later, Kroll's quip proved surprisingly prescient: "Davis," the Coen brothers' fictionalized look at Dave Van Ronk and the '60's folk revival, won the night's top prize, best feature. It was something of an upset for the CBS Films release, which has been on few forecasters' best-picture shortlists.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Made with assurance and deep emotion, "Fruitvale Station" is more than a remarkable directing debut for 26-year-old Ryan Coogler. It's an outstanding film by any standard. Featuring a leap-to-stardom performance by Michael B. Jordan, "Fruitvale's" demonstration of how effective understated, naturalistic filmmaking is at conveying even the most incendiary reality is as hopeful as the story it tells is despairing. "Fruitvale" won both the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award at Sundance, as well as the Un Certain Regard Prize of the Future at Cannes, and its story is a true one, a narrative that created national shock waves when it happened.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
When the nominations for the Spirit Awards came out Tuesday morning, nominees were mostly busy with other things. Shane Carruth, nominated for director and editing for “Upstream Color,” was in line at LAX. Michael B. Jordan, nominated for male lead for “Fruitvale Station,” was in the shower at his family's home in Newark, N.J. In all, 45 films were nominated, from considered Oscar contenders such as “12 Years a Slave” and “Nebraska” to...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013
If "Fruitvale Station" is not yet on your must-see list, it should be. This emotionally potent, true story of the Bay-Area killing of a young African American man is a striking debut for writer-director Ryan Coogler. It is also a game-changer for Michael B. Jordan, who plays 22-year-old Oscar Grant with such nuanced complexity that there is already awards talk. Much has been written - and litigated - about who is responsible for those fateful final minutes of 2008 when a transit cop shot Grant at Oakland's Fruitvale subway station.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Apparently winning two of the biggest prizes at the Sundance Film Festival does not make a film immune from further tinkering, as it was announced Wednesday that "Fruitvale" will be changing its title to "Fruitvale Station. " The film won both the U.S. dramatic grand jury and audience prizes when it premiered at Sundance in January and will be released by the Weinstein Co. on July 26. The feature debut for writer-director Ryan Coogler, the film tells the fact-based story of the life and death of Oscar Grant, an unarmed 22-year-old who was fatally shot by authorities at the Fruitvale train station in Oakland on New Year's Day 2009.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
When Hollywood and street artists try to work together, the road can be bumpy. To promote the upcoming movie "Fruitvale Station," about the 2009 fatal shooting of Oakland's Oscar Grant, the Weinstein Co. commissioned three murals in Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco to be painted by well-known street artists Ron English, Lydia Emily and LNY. But logistical issues and creative conflicts between some of the artists and the studio have led...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Nearly five years after an unarmed 22-year-old black man was shot and killed by a police officer at a Bay Area Rapid Transit station in Oakland, a high-profile movie based on the incident opened Friday in seven theatres across the country, including one not far from the subway station itself. “Fruitvale Station” depicts the death of Oscar Grant, who died on Jan. 1, 2009, at the Fruitvale BART stop where the shooting occurred. His shooting, captured on cellphone videos by onlookers and spread over the Internet, led to protests and demonstrations in the Bay Area and beyond.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
California-made and -set films often turn up at LAFF. Among this year's standouts: "Fruitvale Station" This feature debut from writer-director Ryan Coogler is a gripping drama drawn from the real-life incident in which a 22-year-old man was killed by transit police in an Oakland train station on New Year's Day 2009. Starring Michael B. Jordan in a stirring turn, the film finds dramatic tension in the struggles of the everyday and builds to the tragedy of a life cut short. Having won major prizes at Sundance this year and with the Weinstein Co. now behind it, "Fruitvale Station" should remain in the conversation for months to come.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- Unlike their TV counterparts, scripted movies that try to parallel news events, especially crime-based ones, tend to fall flat. If a film in this vein is done well it can still seem like little more than a network procedural. If it's done badly it can seem phony or forced. We have documentaries for this sort of thing. But that rule doesn't apply to “Fruitvale Station,” the Sundance Film Festival phenomenon that arrives in theaters on Friday (after a TV campaign that, oddly, plays more to the universal idea of second chances than to the story that became a Civil Rights cause célèbre.)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2013
If "Fruitvale Station" is not yet on your must-see list, it should be. This emotionally potent, true story of the Bay-Area killing of a young African American man is a striking debut for writer-director Ryan Coogler. It is also a game-changer for Michael B. Jordan, who plays 22-year-old Oscar Grant with such nuanced complexity that there is already awards talk. Much has been written - and litigated - about who is responsible for those fateful final minutes of 2008 when a transit cop shot Grant at Oakland's Fruitvale subway station.
OPINION
July 17, 2013 | Patt Morrison
The California kid whose first full-length feature film wowed the judges at Sundance and Cannes this year is now showing it off to the world. "Fruitvale Station," about Oscar Grant, the young black man shot and killed by a transit police officer in Oakland on New Year's Day 2009, opens nationwide a week from Friday. Ryan Coogler has been moonlighting as a youth counselor at San Francisco's Juvenile Justice Center (where his dad works), but now his time is at a premium. Coogler's path from football star to filmmaker has people not only talking about his Oscar Grant film but about Oscar, period.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 15, 2013 | By Glenn Whipp
You may have missed it for the racket produced by the majority of movies currently going boom-boom - or, in the case of "The Lone Ranger," bust-bust - at the multiplex. But with the arrival of Sundance Film Festival sensation "Fruitvale Station" in theaters, the opening bell for Oscar season has sounded, providing welcome news for moviegoers immune to the charms of unnecessary reboots and bloated tent-pole movies. And though we're still a long way from sending the tux to the dry cleaners to see what they can do about the stain left from Wolfgang Puck's pork belly dumplings, it's never too early to begin crafting an Oscar campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2013 | By Mikael Wood
Nearly five years after an unarmed 22-year-old black man was shot and killed by a police officer at a Bay Area Rapid Transit station in Oakland, a high-profile movie based on the incident opened Friday in seven theatres across the country, including one not far from the subway station itself. “Fruitvale Station” depicts the death of Oscar Grant, who died on Jan. 1, 2009, at the Fruitvale BART stop where the shooting occurred. His shooting, captured on cellphone videos by onlookers and spread over the Internet, led to protests and demonstrations in the Bay Area and beyond.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- Unlike their TV counterparts, scripted movies that try to parallel news events, especially crime-based ones, tend to fall flat. If a film in this vein is done well it can still seem like little more than a network procedural. If it's done badly it can seem phony or forced. We have documentaries for this sort of thing. But that rule doesn't apply to “Fruitvale Station,” the Sundance Film Festival phenomenon that arrives in theaters on Friday (after a TV campaign that, oddly, plays more to the universal idea of second chances than to the story that became a Civil Rights cause célèbre.)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 11, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Made with assurance and deep emotion, "Fruitvale Station" is more than a remarkable directing debut for 26-year-old Ryan Coogler. It's an outstanding film by any standard. Featuring a leap-to-stardom performance by Michael B. Jordan, "Fruitvale's" demonstration of how effective understated, naturalistic filmmaking is at conveying even the most incendiary reality is as hopeful as the story it tells is despairing. "Fruitvale" won both the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award at Sundance, as well as the Un Certain Regard Prize of the Future at Cannes, and its story is a true one, a narrative that created national shock waves when it happened.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK -- At the start of Monday night's IFP Gotham Independent Awards, host Nick Kroll made an inside "Inside Llewyn Davis" joke.  "A common theme in this year's movies," the comedian said, "are the horrors we inflict upon one another -- slavery, war, folk music. " A few hours later, Kroll's quip proved surprisingly prescient: "Davis," the Coen brothers' fictionalized look at Dave Van Ronk and the '60's folk revival, won the night's top prize, best feature. It was something of an upset for the CBS Films release, which has been on few forecasters' best-picture shortlists.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
CANNES, France -- You'd expect a savvy pro such as Octavia Spencer to have dropped in on the Cannes Film Festival once or twice over the years. But there she was on Thursday afternoon, taking it all in like a wide-eyed tourist. “First time," said the 42-year-old Oscar winner. “First time. I guess I should go out and see some big movies,” she added with her usual irreverence as she sat at a beachside restaurant, gazing at tables of diners and the yachts docked in the Mediterranean beyond them.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
When Hollywood and street artists try to work together, the road can be bumpy. To promote the upcoming movie "Fruitvale Station," about the 2009 fatal shooting of Oakland's Oscar Grant, the Weinstein Co. commissioned three murals in Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco to be painted by well-known street artists Ron English, Lydia Emily and LNY. But logistical issues and creative conflicts between some of the artists and the studio have led...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 9, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
California-made and -set films often turn up at LAFF. Among this year's standouts: "Fruitvale Station" This feature debut from writer-director Ryan Coogler is a gripping drama drawn from the real-life incident in which a 22-year-old man was killed by transit police in an Oakland train station on New Year's Day 2009. Starring Michael B. Jordan in a stirring turn, the film finds dramatic tension in the struggles of the everyday and builds to the tragedy of a life cut short. Having won major prizes at Sundance this year and with the Weinstein Co. now behind it, "Fruitvale Station" should remain in the conversation for months to come.
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