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Ryan Heckman

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SPORTS
February 17, 1994 | MIKE KUPPER, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
At 19, Ryan Heckman is a changed young Olympian. No more winning-is-the-only-thing for him. "I think I have a much more lighthearted respect for the Olympic Games now," he said the other day. "I think it's easy as a young adult to get caught up in the performance syndrome. You know, people are really nice to you when you do well and sometimes they're not nice when you do poorly. Having gone through some setbacks and almost hit rock bottom a couple times, I'm just here to have fun.
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SPORTS
February 17, 1994 | MIKE KUPPER, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
At 19, Ryan Heckman is a changed young Olympian. No more winning-is-the-only-thing for him. "I think I have a much more lighthearted respect for the Olympic Games now," he said the other day. "I think it's easy as a young adult to get caught up in the performance syndrome. You know, people are really nice to you when you do well and sometimes they're not nice when you do poorly. Having gone through some setbacks and almost hit rock bottom a couple times, I'm just here to have fun.
SPORTS
February 19, 1992 | MIKE KUPPER
The U.S. Nordic combined team dropped from fourth after Monday's normal-hill ski jumping to a final eighth in the 30-kilometer team cross-country race. Joe Holland of Norwich, Vt., was the first skier out but was quickly caught and passed by Japan's Reiichi Mikata, who helped his team to the gold medal. Norway took the silver, Austria the bronze. Skiing behind Holland for the United States were Tim Tetreault, also of Norwich, and Ryan Heckman of Steamboat Springs, Colo. Each skied 10 kilometers.
SPORTS
January 11, 1995 | From Associated Press
The Purdue Calumet women's basketball team, which has lost six players because of injury, illness, grades or unexpected departure, has canceled the rest of its schedule. The Lady Lakers have played only two games, with a victory over Robert Morris and a loss to Taylor. Seven players dressed for the last game, Dec. 29, but injuries hampered several of them, Coach Gary Hayes said. College Football The rules committee of the American Football Coaches Assn.
SPORTS
February 25, 1994 | MIKE KUPPER
Speaking of most-decorated athletes, cross-country skier Manuela Di Centa of Italy claimed that title for these Games when she won her fifth medal, the gold in the women's 30-kilometer classical race. Di Centa, 31, who had won the first gold medal of the Games on Feb. 13, led all the way, beating Marit Wold of Norway by 16.2 seconds. She finished with two golds, two silvers and a bronze, having won a medal in every race she skied in.
SPORTS
February 19, 1997 | BOB LOCHNER
A new episode was written last weekend in the long-running miniseries-on-snow, "Friends?" when quiet, plain Hilary Lindh became the world's fastest female skier not wearing a knee brace. And nobody could have been happier for her than the woman with the gimpy knee, effervescent, glamorous Picabo Street. Of course.
SPORTS
February 8, 1994 | MIKE KUPPER, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
It should come as no surprise that United States athletes do not figure to clean up in the Nordic events during the Winter Olympics opening Saturday. Americans have never been very successful in Nordic skiing--cross-country and jumping--and its spinoff, the biathlon. They have seldom threatened the dominating northern Europeans for whom the competition is named. Only twice, in fact, since the Winter Games began in 1924, have Americans won Nordic medals.
SPORTS
February 8, 1992 | MIKE KUPPER, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Figure skating and Alpine skiing--and hockey at 20-year intervals--are the glamour events of the Winter Olympics, as Americans know them. So what does that make the Nordic events--ski jumping and cross-country skiing? Well, on this side of the Atlantic, Nordic skiing stands every bit as tall as those other events. And so does the biathlon, which, although technically not a Nordic event, is close enough to be at least a cousin.
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