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Ryan Jaroncyk

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SPORTS
October 25, 2001 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This story could be all about promise unfulfilled and then lost in the undertow of the minor leagues. The underlying subplot could include the supposed field of dreams turning from a safe haven into a prison, the sport that brings fathers and sons together doing the opposite instead. But it's not. Professional sports do not confer instant happiness, of course. Nor does life on the outside mean lasting despair. , Ryan Jaroncyk will provide compelling testimony ... if you ask him.
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SPORTS
October 25, 2001 | LISA DILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This story could be all about promise unfulfilled and then lost in the undertow of the minor leagues. The underlying subplot could include the supposed field of dreams turning from a safe haven into a prison, the sport that brings fathers and sons together doing the opposite instead. But it's not. Professional sports do not confer instant happiness, of course. Nor does life on the outside mean lasting despair. , Ryan Jaroncyk will provide compelling testimony ... if you ask him.
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SPORTS
June 7, 1995 | MIKE DiGIOVANNA
Lewis Yocum, team physician, made a 2,600-mile house call Tuesday, traveling from Los Angeles to Boston to visit the infirmary that is the Angel clubhouse, and the prognoses weren't all good. Damion Easley, who hasn't started the past three games because of a sprained right wrist, could return today, and the cut on backup catcher Andy Allanson's left hand has almost healed.
SPORTS
June 2, 1995 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recruited to punt for Nebraska's football team, Darin Erstad decided to play baseball for the Cornhuskers because he loved the sport. The decision paid off for Erstad on Thursday, when the Angels made him the No. 1 selection in the amateur baseball draft. "It's kind of hard to believe," he said. "The money's not going to change who I am. I play the game because I love it." Catcher Ben Davis of Malvern Prep outside of Philadelphia, the second player selected in the draft, received a $1.
NEWS
October 25, 1997 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troy Glaus worked hard in college, refining the skills he would need to succeed in his chosen profession. When he left UCLA for the real world this year, a company hired him for its training program, believing he could develop into a consistent producer within several years. Fortunately for Glaus, his chosen profession is baseball. And, rather than lure Glaus with a starting salary of $50,000 or perks like a company car, the Anaheim Angels paid him a $2.
NEWS
October 25, 1997 | BILL SHAIKIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Troy Glaus worked hard in college, refining the skills he would need to succeed in his chosen profession. When he left UCLA for the real world this year, a company hired him for its training program, believing that he could develop into a consistent producer within several years. Fortunately for Glaus, his chosen profession is baseball. And rather than lure Glaus with a starting salary of $50,000 or perks like a company car, the Anaheim Angels paid him a $2.
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