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Ryan White

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SPORTS
January 4, 2014 | By Gary Klein
Javorius Allen's emergence as USC's top tailback this season was not lost on several players who will be participating in Monday's Bowl Championship Series title game. Ryan White, a senior defensive back for Auburn, played with Allen at Tallahassee (Fla.) Lincoln High, where Allen got the nickname “Buck.” Allen, a third-year sophomore, got his first significant playing time in the Trojans' sixth game against Arizona, and he finished the season with 785 yards rushing and 15 touchdowns.
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SPORTS
January 4, 2014 | By Gary Klein
Javorius Allen's emergence as USC's top tailback this season was not lost on several players who will be participating in Monday's Bowl Championship Series title game. Ryan White, a senior defensive back for Auburn, played with Allen at Tallahassee (Fla.) Lincoln High, where Allen got the nickname “Buck.” Allen, a third-year sophomore, got his first significant playing time in the Trojans' sixth game against Arizona, and he finished the season with 785 yards rushing and 15 touchdowns.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990
The life struggle and death of Ryan White inspires everyone, touches everyone and silences one and all with respect. He is a genuine hero. My comments are directed to the multitude of sad-eyed newscasters and hypocritical politicians who made such a point of mourning this particular victim of AIDS. I am appalled by the double standard of compassion exhibited by the public. No, Ryan White never "deserved" what he got and he fought valiantly. Remember, however, he is one of the hundreds of thousands who have gone "quickly into the night."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 2013 | By Chelsea Clinton
This past summer, in a small village outside of Phnom Penh, not far from the Mekong River, I met an 8-year-old boy named Basil. He couldn't stop laughing, playing, racing around the village like any boy his age. Visiting him meant something special to me because my father had met Basil too, in 2005. At the time, Basil was a tubercular baby ravaged by AIDS and abandoned by his family, with little hope for survival. Back then, infants who had gotten the disease from their mothers were 25% of the cases in Cambodia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Jeanne White, mother of the renowned young AIDS patient Ryan White who died in 1990, will speak Saturday at the fifth annual HIV Women's Conference at UC Irvine. White will discuss the fear and intolerance surrounding people with the human immunodeficiency virus, which leads to AIDS. Her hemophiliac son, Ryan, became infected through a 1984 blood transfusion and was banned from his Indiana school because of fear that he might contaminate classmates.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | GEORGE ESPER, Associated Press
Georgia Harmon and friends were holding court over coffee at a big round table in Donovan's Tavern one Wednesday morning. Jim Donovan Kinder, the owner of the place, refilled the cups every now and then. "It's just a little hometown tavern where people can come and have coffee in the morning and visit," he explained. Some of the talk that day was about Ryan White, a 15-year-old boy with AIDS, who had received a warm reception as a new freshman at Hamilton Heights High School.
NEWS
April 9, 1990 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ryan White, the kid from Kokomo who captured the hearts of presidents, rock stars and the nation during his five-year battle against AIDS and bigotry, died Sunday. He was 18. "He was the boy next door who first showed to a stunned nation that no one is safe from the risk of AIDS," said Dr. Martin B. Kleiman of Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Medical Center, where White died of the complications of AIDS.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 1990 | JEANNE WRIGHT
Channon Phipps acts like your "typical 15-year-old," in the words of his aunt and guardian. He is "always wanting something new, like new (audio) speakers," Deborah Phipps Franckewitz explained. "He's really into music. And he loves girls. Finding girlfriends has never been a problem for him. . . . He has tons of friends. People have been very understanding." Franckewitz said she is always very careful to inform the parents of Channon's friends about his condition.
NEWS
July 9, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vandals again desecrated the grave of Ryan White, the young AIDS victim who fought discrimination against those with the disease, Cicero, Ind., police said. White's 6-foot 8-inch gravestone at Cicero Cemetery was toppled Friday night or Saturday morning. In three earlier incidents, vandals used paint or uprooted flowers to desecrate the grave, police said. Ryan's mother, Jeanne White, offered a $500 reward for information leading to the vandals' arrests.
NEWS
November 9, 1986 | Associated Press
AIDS victim Ryan White, 14, whose illness sparked a legal battle last year over whether he should attend school, has been admitted to Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis with a high fever, his mother, Jeanne White, said Saturday. Ryan, who has attended classes in Kokomo, Ind., all of this fall, was hospitalized on Monday. A hemophiliac, he contracted acquired immune deficiency syndrome in December, 1984, through a blood-clotting agent.
NATIONAL
December 12, 2007 | Seema Mehta, Times Staff Writer
Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee defended himself Tuesday against continuing criticism of statements he made about AIDS 15 years ago, when he called for isolating those stricken with the disease to prevent it from spreading. Huckabee said his statements reflected the state of knowledge about AIDS at the time, even though the U.S. surgeon general had by then reported that the disease could not be spread through casual contact. "Obviously, we know a lot more today.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2000 | PEARL JEMISON-SMITH, Pearl Jemison-Smith is chairwoman of AIDS Walk Orange County
Ten years ago this month Ryan White, an 18-year-old from Indiana, died of AIDS contracted via transfusions for his hemophilia. The life-prolonging drugs we have today did not come soon enough for Ryan, who fought not only HIV but the discrimination, fear and ignorance that still accompany the disease. That same year, a piece of federal legislation named the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency Act (also known as the CARE Act) was passed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1996 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jeanne White has told the story countless times: Her son, Ryan White, a hemophiliac, was diagnosed with full-blown AIDS at 13 and died at 18. In those five years, he had to battle prejudice while learning how to live with a disease that ravaged his young body even as it changed the political, social and medical scope of the world.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1996 | LESLEY WRIGHT
Jeanne White, mother of the renowned young AIDS patient Ryan White who died in 1990, will speak Saturday at the fifth annual HIV Women's Conference at UC Irvine. White will discuss the fear and intolerance surrounding people with the human immunodeficiency virus, which leads to AIDS. Her hemophiliac son, Ryan, became infected through a 1984 blood transfusion and was banned from his Indiana school because of fear that he might contaminate classmates.
OPINION
July 7, 1996 | JAMES DRISCOLL, James Driscoll of San Francisco is national AIDS policy advisor to the Log Cabin Republicans
The 11th International AIDS Conference, which begins today in Vancouver, will tell the world about major breakthroughs in AIDS drug research. Already, reports abound of patients enjoying spectacular recoveries with the new protease drug regimens. A few years ago at the seventh conference in San Francisco, activists were chanting: "Seven years, $2 billion and one lousy drug." In the last year alone, the Food and Drug Administration has approved five important new AIDS antivirals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995
Despite an impressive roster of more than 60 Senate co-sponsors, important AIDS funding faces an uphill battle on Capitol Hill. That's because the money provided by the Ryan White CARE Act is threatened by congressional budget slashers intent on reducing outlays no matter how penny-wise and pound-foolish that might be.
NEWS
April 24, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The Town Council here is trying to come up with another way to honor Ryan White after citizens objected to renaming a park after the young AIDS victim. One potential compromise is dedicating a memorial in the Red Bridge Park for White. Council members last week announced plans to change the name of the park and a fund for donations to build a playground there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1995 | ANTONIO OLIVO
Today is the fifth anniversary of Ryan White's death from AIDS. To commemorate the date and to support efforts initiated by Ryan for increased education on issues surrounding acquired immune deficiency syndrome, about 1,000 skating rinks across the country--including rinks in Northridge and Glendale--will donate a portion of their weekend admission fees to the Ryan White Foundation. In an effort to raise at least $100,000 for the foundation, members of the Roller Skating Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1994 | PEARL JEMISON-SMITH, Pearl Jemison-Smith chairs the Orange County HIV Planning Advisory Council. and
With the hopes for national health care reform lost this year, Congress should use what remains of the 1994 session to pass health-related legislation that addresses some of the most vulnerable groups in America. The Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency Act of 1990 (CARE Act) provides over $600 million in community-based health and social services for thousands of men, women and children living with AIDS and HIV.
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