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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1992 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People infected with the human immunodeficiency virus and those who have AIDS are invited to testify about community services available to them at a series of hearings next week, county officials said Thursday. The hearings will allow local officials to better plan the types of services to make available to those in need, said Ron Yardley, a spokesman for the county health department.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2000 | PEARL JEMISON-SMITH, Pearl Jemison-Smith is chairwoman of AIDS Walk Orange County
Ten years ago this month Ryan White, an 18-year-old from Indiana, died of AIDS contracted via transfusions for his hemophilia. The life-prolonging drugs we have today did not come soon enough for Ryan, who fought not only HIV but the discrimination, fear and ignorance that still accompany the disease. That same year, a piece of federal legislation named the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency Act (also known as the CARE Act) was passed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1994 | PEARL JEMISON-SMITH, Pearl Jemison-Smith chairs the Orange County HIV Planning Advisory Council. and
With the hopes for national health care reform lost this year, Congress should use what remains of the 1994 session to pass health-related legislation that addresses some of the most vulnerable groups in America. The Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency Act of 1990 (CARE Act) provides over $600 million in community-based health and social services for thousands of men, women and children living with AIDS and HIV.
NEWS
May 21, 1996 | From Associated Press
Before a roomful of AIDS activists Monday, President Clinton signed a five-year extension of the Ryan White Care Act. The law helps pay for home care, transportation, counseling, hospice care and other support for people with AIDS or the human immunodeficiency virus. The law devotes $738 million toward AIDS support services for fiscal 1996, up from $632 million last year. Clinton awarded $350 million Monday; the remainder already has been allocated.
NEWS
May 21, 1996 | From Associated Press
Before a roomful of AIDS activists Monday, President Clinton signed a five-year extension of the Ryan White Care Act. The law helps pay for home care, transportation, counseling, hospice care and other support for people with AIDS or the human immunodeficiency virus. The law devotes $738 million toward AIDS support services for fiscal 1996, up from $632 million last year. Clinton awarded $350 million Monday; the remainder already has been allocated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995
Despite an impressive roster of more than 60 Senate co-sponsors, important AIDS funding faces an uphill battle on Capitol Hill. That's because the money provided by the Ryan White CARE Act is threatened by congressional budget slashers intent on reducing outlays no matter how penny-wise and pound-foolish that might be.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2000 | PEARL JEMISON-SMITH, Pearl Jemison-Smith is chairwoman of AIDS Walk Orange County
Ten years ago this month Ryan White, an 18-year-old from Indiana, died of AIDS contracted via transfusions for his hemophilia. The life-prolonging drugs we have today did not come soon enough for Ryan, who fought not only HIV but the discrimination, fear and ignorance that still accompany the disease. That same year, a piece of federal legislation named the Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency Act (also known as the CARE Act) was passed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1996 | BETTINA BOXALL and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Consider two people with AIDS. One lives in San Francisco, the other in Los Angeles. The federal government will spend more than twice as much on the care and treatment of the San Francisco resident as on the Angeleno. That gap, based on a complex funding formula, is at the heart of an intensely political and protracted effort to change the way federal money for AIDS care is distributed to cities.
NEWS
November 14, 1992
Gabe Kruks, 42, chief operating officer of the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Community Services Center. Among his many activities, Kruks, a onetime driver in the Israeli army who worked in the film industry, developed programs to get homeless teen-agers off the streets. He helped draft the national Ryan White Care Act and was credited with being the first openly gay person to sit on the Health Resources Services Administration's AIDS advisory committee.
BUSINESS
March 10, 1994 | Anne Michaud / Times staff writer
AIDS Education: The AIDS Services Foundation of Orange County has selected Irvine-based Lawrence & Mayo to develop its 1994 education program for health-care providers. The campaign marks the foundation's first targeted effort to that group. The ad agency's campaign publicizes the foundation's services for patients with AIDS symptoms: benefits counseling, mental health programs, a food pantry and shelter services.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1996 | BETTINA BOXALL and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Consider two people with AIDS. One lives in San Francisco, the other in Los Angeles. The federal government will spend more than twice as much on the care and treatment of the San Francisco resident as on the Angeleno. That gap, based on a complex funding formula, is at the heart of an intensely political and protracted effort to change the way federal money for AIDS care is distributed to cities.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 1995
Despite an impressive roster of more than 60 Senate co-sponsors, important AIDS funding faces an uphill battle on Capitol Hill. That's because the money provided by the Ryan White CARE Act is threatened by congressional budget slashers intent on reducing outlays no matter how penny-wise and pound-foolish that might be.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1994 | PEARL JEMISON-SMITH, Pearl Jemison-Smith chairs the Orange County HIV Planning Advisory Council. and
With the hopes for national health care reform lost this year, Congress should use what remains of the 1994 session to pass health-related legislation that addresses some of the most vulnerable groups in America. The Ryan White Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency Act of 1990 (CARE Act) provides over $600 million in community-based health and social services for thousands of men, women and children living with AIDS and HIV.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 3, 1992 | NORA ZAMICHOW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
People infected with the human immunodeficiency virus and those who have AIDS are invited to testify about community services available to them at a series of hearings next week, county officials said Thursday. The hearings will allow local officials to better plan the types of services to make available to those in need, said Ron Yardley, a spokesman for the county health department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 1991
The Ventura County AIDS Task Force has teamed up with area health-care professionals to organize a series of events highlighting October AIDS Awareness Month. DATE, TIME: Thursday, 7 p.m. EVENT: "Infection Control and HIV/AIDS in the Dental Office: Addressing Your Concerns" LOCATION: Ventura County Public Health Auditorium, 3147 Loma Vista Road, Ventura DATE, TIME: Saturday, 7 p.m. EVENT: AIDS Candlelight Vigil LOCATION: Plaza Park, Ventura DATE, TIME: Oct. 8, 7 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1992 | CLAIRE SPIEGEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost $4.5 million in federal AIDS funds given to Los Angeles County last year remains unspent because county officials were too slow in awarding contracts for services, AIDS activists charged Friday. As a result of the inefficiency, the county lost another $1 million this year that could have helped provide health care for AIDS patients, the activists charged. Robert Frangenberg, head of the county AIDS office, acknowledged there was a delay last year in distributing $7.
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