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NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Pick a card, any card, to pay for your next flight? At Ryanair , it could cost you. The Dublin, Ireland-based budget airline announced a new fee that I pray never catches on in the U.S. or elsewhere. Starting Nov. 1, the airline plans to charge 6 pounds (about $9.50) for each leg of a ticket paid for with anything other than its own MasterCard Debit Card. So that's 12 pounds for a round-trip flight. This is the latest charge to add to Ryanair's string of fees already in place -- checking bags, priority boarding, etc. And remember, this is the airline that once considered charging a bathroom fee too. Columnist Ed Perkins at SmarterTravel offers these words of warning about potential copycats: "Ryanair is, as many of you know, the undoubted world 'hate this airline' champion, which has originated many of the fees that other lines subsequently adopted.
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BUSINESS
September 15, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
If reducing your carbon footprint is a priority, Alaska Airlines may be the carrier for you. In its first efficiency study, the International Council on Clean Transportation ranked the Seattle-based carrier as the nation's most fuel-efficient major airline, followed by low-cost Spirit Airlines and Hawaiian Airlines. Alaska was 26% more fuel-efficient than the least efficient airline, Allegiant Air, according to the study, released last week. “Aviation is a critical part of the U.S. economy, but it consumes a lot of oil and it's the fastest-growing contributor to climate change from the transportation sector globally,” said Drew Kodjak, executive director of the International Council on Clean Transportation . About one third of the efficiencies can be attributed to technology, such as the use of fuel-efficient engines and those up-turned winglets installed on many newer jets, the study concluded.
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BUSINESS
November 11, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Seat belts on airplanes are useless. That was the latest rant by Michael O'Leary, the chief executive for RyanAir, the ultra-low-cost airline based in Ireland. O'Leary, who opposes seat belts because he is pushing for standing-room sections of his planes, called aviation authorities who disagree with him “plonkers.” “Seat belts don't matter,” O'Leary told The Telegraph. “If there ever was a crash on an aircraft, God forbid, a seat belt won't save you.” ALSO: American Airlines on-time rating drops during labor dispute FAA recommends seat inspections on some airlines Chicago's O'Hare, LAX to be busiest airports for Thanksgiving Follow Hugo Martin on Twitter at @hugomartin
BUSINESS
September 1, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
The digital revolution has imperiled the future of many job categories, including darkroom film processor, typewriter repairman and telephone operator. With the surge of sophisticated travel websites, can we include travel agents to the list of nearly obsolete jobs? As you might expect, the American Society of Travel Agents doesn't think so. The trade group that represents more than 5,900 travel agents and travel firms rejects the notion that travel websites will eventually put warmhearted agents out of work.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Jason La, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
If you've ever had a child kick your seat or cry in your ears during a flight, you might be happy to hear about a new program that Dublin-based Ryanair announced in a press release dated April 1 -- or perhaps just floated as a bit of April Fools' fun. The low-cost airline says it will offer "child free" flights starting in October. The press release cites "a Europe-wide survey of 1,000 passengers" that Ryanair said shows they would pay more money to fly child-free. It points to these as respondents' top complaints: 1. 50%: Parents who expect "special treatment" because they have children 2. 25%: Parents who allow children to annoy those in seats behind 3. 15%: Parents who board late and expect others to accommodate them 4. 10%: Parents who allow children to run in the aisles or kick seats Hmm ... All the percentages are multiples of five and they add up to 100%.
TRAVEL
March 4, 2007 | Elliott Hester, Special to The Times
IF Europe's on your vacation wish list this summer, be prepared. A ticket at the height of the season could set you back $1,000 or more. You can pay full freight and make the most of it, or mitigate the financial sticker shock by going earlier. Round-trip flights from Los Angeles to London are considerably cheaper in April and May than in the height of summer.
NEWS
March 1, 2009 | Shawn Pogatchnik, Pogatchnik writes for the Associated Press
When nature calls at 30,000 feet, is $1.40 a wee price to pay? Or could it force passengers without correct change into a whole new kind of holding pattern? The head of European budget airline Ryanair unleashed a flood of indignation and potty humor Friday when he suggested that future passengers might be obliged to insert a British pound coin for access to the lavatory to get some in-flight relief. Airline chief Michael O'Leary suggested that installing pay toilets would lower ticket costs and make flying, somehow, easier for all. Not even his own aides seemed to be sure if he was serious or pursuing his penchant for making brazen declarations to get free publicity for Ryanair.
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The National Park Service will waive admission fees on 17 days in 2012 . Among the free dates will be Jan. 14-16 ( Martin Luther King Jr. weekend), April 21- 29 (National Park Week) and June 9 (Get Outdoors Day). For more info, click here . . . . Dublin-based budget airline Ryanair has announced plans to cut down to just one toilet per aircraft , which would allow the addition of six more seats. Ryanair has not announced a date to implement the plan . . . . The Balboa Bay Club & Resort hosts " The Music & Stories of Frank Sinatra & Nat King Cole" on Sunday, Nov. 20, in the Commodore Room . . . . Roast magazine has named Bird Rock Coffee Roasters in La Jolla the  Micro Roaster of the Year . . . . Think the holidays are coming fast?
BUSINESS
September 1, 2013 | By Hugo Martín
The digital revolution has imperiled the future of many job categories, including darkroom film processor, typewriter repairman and telephone operator. With the surge of sophisticated travel websites, can we include travel agents to the list of nearly obsolete jobs? As you might expect, the American Society of Travel Agents doesn't think so. The trade group that represents more than 5,900 travel agents and travel firms rejects the notion that travel websites will eventually put warmhearted agents out of work.
OPINION
September 15, 2006
ATTENTION PASSENGERS: YOU ARE now allowed to use your cellphone, pager, BlackBerry or any other up-to-the-minute mode of communication during flight. But please be advised that should you rudely blather on during the entire six-hour trip, we reserve the right to lock you in the bathroom or let other passengers come up with their own form of justice. OK, so American passengers won't be hearing that preflight announcement anytime soon.
BUSINESS
November 11, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
Seat belts on airplanes are useless. That was the latest rant by Michael O'Leary, the chief executive for RyanAir, the ultra-low-cost airline based in Ireland. O'Leary, who opposes seat belts because he is pushing for standing-room sections of his planes, called aviation authorities who disagree with him “plonkers.” “Seat belts don't matter,” O'Leary told The Telegraph. “If there ever was a crash on an aircraft, God forbid, a seat belt won't save you.” ALSO: American Airlines on-time rating drops during labor dispute FAA recommends seat inspections on some airlines Chicago's O'Hare, LAX to be busiest airports for Thanksgiving Follow Hugo Martin on Twitter at @hugomartin
NEWS
October 19, 2011 | By Chris Erskine, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
The National Park Service will waive admission fees on 17 days in 2012 . Among the free dates will be Jan. 14-16 ( Martin Luther King Jr. weekend), April 21- 29 (National Park Week) and June 9 (Get Outdoors Day). For more info, click here . . . . Dublin-based budget airline Ryanair has announced plans to cut down to just one toilet per aircraft , which would allow the addition of six more seats. Ryanair has not announced a date to implement the plan . . . . The Balboa Bay Club & Resort hosts " The Music & Stories of Frank Sinatra & Nat King Cole" on Sunday, Nov. 20, in the Commodore Room . . . . Roast magazine has named Bird Rock Coffee Roasters in La Jolla the  Micro Roaster of the Year . . . . Think the holidays are coming fast?
NEWS
September 16, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
Pick a card, any card, to pay for your next flight? At Ryanair , it could cost you. The Dublin, Ireland-based budget airline announced a new fee that I pray never catches on in the U.S. or elsewhere. Starting Nov. 1, the airline plans to charge 6 pounds (about $9.50) for each leg of a ticket paid for with anything other than its own MasterCard Debit Card. So that's 12 pounds for a round-trip flight. This is the latest charge to add to Ryanair's string of fees already in place -- checking bags, priority boarding, etc. And remember, this is the airline that once considered charging a bathroom fee too. Columnist Ed Perkins at SmarterTravel offers these words of warning about potential copycats: "Ryanair is, as many of you know, the undoubted world 'hate this airline' champion, which has originated many of the fees that other lines subsequently adopted.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2011 | Hugo Martin
If you are flying out of Boston Logan International Airport, be prepared to have a brief conversation with a Transportation Security Administration officer who will be interested in more than what you have to say. Under a 60-day pilot program that starts next week, TSA officials will approach passengers with a few questions to gauge their reaction and look for signs that they may be hiding something. The program is another layer in the country's airport security program that includes full-body scans and pat-down searches.
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Jason La, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
April Fools' has been a busy "news" day for the airline industry. In the name of fun, many carriers worldwide are announcing groundbreaking innovations aimed at improving the passenger experience, cutting costs and even defying the laws of physics. Earlier, I wrote about Ryanair's move to offer child-free flights . Here's a roundup of more April Fools' airline news/gags: -- In a post on its blog, Southwest announced that its team of scientists (the kind who study time travel, not the kind who build planes)
NEWS
April 1, 2011 | By Jason La, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
If you've ever had a child kick your seat or cry in your ears during a flight, you might be happy to hear about a new program that Dublin-based Ryanair announced in a press release dated April 1 -- or perhaps just floated as a bit of April Fools' fun. The low-cost airline says it will offer "child free" flights starting in October. The press release cites "a Europe-wide survey of 1,000 passengers" that Ryanair said shows they would pay more money to fly child-free. It points to these as respondents' top complaints: 1. 50%: Parents who expect "special treatment" because they have children 2. 25%: Parents who allow children to annoy those in seats behind 3. 15%: Parents who board late and expect others to accommodate them 4. 10%: Parents who allow children to run in the aisles or kick seats Hmm ... All the percentages are multiples of five and they add up to 100%.
BUSINESS
September 15, 2013 | By Hugo Martin
If reducing your carbon footprint is a priority, Alaska Airlines may be the carrier for you. In its first efficiency study, the International Council on Clean Transportation ranked the Seattle-based carrier as the nation's most fuel-efficient major airline, followed by low-cost Spirit Airlines and Hawaiian Airlines. Alaska was 26% more fuel-efficient than the least efficient airline, Allegiant Air, according to the study, released last week. “Aviation is a critical part of the U.S. economy, but it consumes a lot of oil and it's the fastest-growing contributor to climate change from the transportation sector globally,” said Drew Kodjak, executive director of the International Council on Clean Transportation . About one third of the efficiencies can be attributed to technology, such as the use of fuel-efficient engines and those up-turned winglets installed on many newer jets, the study concluded.
BUSINESS
August 8, 2011 | Hugo Martin
If you are flying out of Boston Logan International Airport, be prepared to have a brief conversation with a Transportation Security Administration officer who will be interested in more than what you have to say. Under a 60-day pilot program that starts next week, TSA officials will approach passengers with a few questions to gauge their reaction and look for signs that they may be hiding something. The program is another layer in the country's airport security program that includes full-body scans and pat-down searches.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2009 | Times Staff And Wire Reports
Ryanair Holdings, Europe's largest low-cost airline, will bar passengers from traveling with anything other than hand luggage as it seeks to cut costs. Ryanair plans to offer an unlimited allowance for carry-on bags that comply with government size limits while abolishing checked luggage, starting next spring, Chief Executive Michael O'Leary said. "This isn't the end of civilization as we know it, it only sounds revolutionary," he said. Passengers will carry belongings onto the plane; when overhead bins are full items will go in the cargo hold.
NEWS
March 1, 2009 | Shawn Pogatchnik, Pogatchnik writes for the Associated Press
When nature calls at 30,000 feet, is $1.40 a wee price to pay? Or could it force passengers without correct change into a whole new kind of holding pattern? The head of European budget airline Ryanair unleashed a flood of indignation and potty humor Friday when he suggested that future passengers might be obliged to insert a British pound coin for access to the lavatory to get some in-flight relief. Airline chief Michael O'Leary suggested that installing pay toilets would lower ticket costs and make flying, somehow, easier for all. Not even his own aides seemed to be sure if he was serious or pursuing his penchant for making brazen declarations to get free publicity for Ryanair.
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