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NEWS
November 7, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
A pair of otherworldly photos from Superstorm Sandy will be forever etched in my memory of the historic hurricane. The first photo showed up in much of the mainstream media coverage and became a symbol of the storm: A seemingly intact roller coaster poking out of the Atlantic Ocean off the Jersey Shore like the skeleton of a sea serpent. The second image ricocheted around the Internet via social media sites and became a symbol of vulnerability and resilience following the storm: An undamaged carousel inside an eerily lit enclosure completely surrounded by water that looked like a glowing jewelry box floating off the New York City coast.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 2004 | Kimi Yoshino, Times Staff Writer
State investigators Tuesday asked Knott's Berry Farm and Six Flags Magic Mountain to each shut down one roller coaster equipped with a restraint system that has been the focus of investigations in two recent fatal accidents out of state. Both parks said they would comply with the request, which comes as amusement parks enter their peak season. State officials said it is the first time they have requested safety improvements based on accidents outside California.
NEWS
October 27, 2002 | Colleen Long, Associated Press Writer
Inside the concrete walls of Distortions Unlimited, blood is spilled, decomposed bodies are wrapped in plastic and green ghoulish figures stare in horror. Company owners Ed and Marsha Edmunds don't get scared very often. Good thing, because they are among the top "hauntrepreneurs" in the nation, manufacturing masks, creepy animatronics and frightening set displays for haunted houses and amusement parks worldwide. They also fashioned props and sets for Alice Cooper's current tour.
SPORTS
May 30, 1994 | HELENE ELLIOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The real Ranger fans knew their hearts would be broken again. The Wall Street types in the expensive suits thought the game was over and were high-fiving each other, but the fans in the cheaper seats--no seats at Madison Square Garden are cheap--held back. They were wondering what form the torture would take this time, how the defeat they saw coming would compare to all the other wounds they had suffered since the Rangers last won the Stanley Cup in 1940.
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