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Ryohei Murata

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NEWS
October 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
Ryohei Murata, former administrative vice minister for foreign affairs, will be Japan's new ambassador to the United States, the Foreign Ministry said.
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NEWS
October 7, 1989 | From Associated Press
Ryohei Murata, former administrative vice minister for foreign affairs, will be Japan's new ambassador to the United States, the Foreign Ministry said.
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BUSINESS
June 12, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The United States and Japan signed a five-year agreement aimed at boosting to at least 20% the foreign share of the Japanese computer chip market by the end of next year. Ambassador Carla Anderson Hills, the U.S. trade representative, and Ryohei Murata, Japanese ambassador to Washington, led the signing ceremony at Hills' office, where negotiations concluded a week ago. The pact takes effect Aug. 1.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | From Associated Press
The Japanese government is considering an aid package to help Panama recover from the ravages caused by the U.S. military invasion, Japan's ambassador said in a meeting with Vice President Dan Quayle today. Quayle, at the start of the meeting with Ambassador Ryohei Murata, announced that Japan has decided to formally recognize the U.S.-installed government of Guillermo Endara in Panama.
NEWS
November 1, 1987
Japan has turned down a U.S. request to join in economic sanctions against Iran. "Given that the U.N. secretary general is still continuing his efforts (to mediate in the Iran-Iraq conflict). . . we think it is too early to take economic measures against Iran," Deputy Foreign Minister Ryohei Murata told U.S. Under Secretary of State Michael H. Armacost at a meeting in Tokyo. Japan, which imports virtually all its oil, buys about 7% from Iran. West Germany also has rejected the U.S.
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | Times staff writers
Say you're in a strange town on business and need a good place to eat--where do you go? After his long day of summit talks with President Bush, Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu went Italian at Antonello Ristorante in Santa Ana. His party of 10 included Japanese Ambassador Ryohei Murata. Few if any other diners knew who had been whisked to the private upstairs room. Kaifu "was rushed in," said assistant manager Craig Gilbert.
NEWS
November 9, 1989 | SARAH BOOTH CONROY, WASHINGTON POST
Next month, the French ambassador's venerable chateau here will still flow with champagne and the ancient friendship brought during the American Revolution by the Marquis de Lafayette. The koi in the garden pool at the Tokyo Modern Japanese ambassador's residence will continue to grow fat and fancy, and the sake will be poured as freely. Even so, with the mid-month departure of the French and Japanese ambassadors, the parties and the people will be different in those bastions of embassy row.
BUSINESS
February 23, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Complaining that Japanese bureaucrats stubbornly insist on "defending the status quo," U.S. officials on Thursday called upon Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu to make a political commitment to remove structural barriers to trade. "Too often today, instead of hearing new ideas, we heard simply a defense of the status quo," a member of a delegation from Washington told reporters after a third round of talks began here on the so-called Structural Impediments Initiative.
NEWS
March 23, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration is putting pressure on Japan to improve its ties with the Israelis, and, in particular, to bring to an end the longstanding compliance by many Japanese companies with the Arab boycott of trade with Israel. During a series of meetings here during the last two days, Secretary of State James A. Baker III and other U.S.
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