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Ryszard Kuklinski

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Col. Ryszard Kuklinski, a Polish army officer who spied on his country and the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact for the CIA during the communist era and later fled to the United States, has died. He was 73. Kuklinski had a stroke Feb. 5 and died Tuesday in a military hospital in Tampa, Fla., said longtime friend Jozef Szaniawski. U.S. officials confirmed his death but would not say where he died.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 12, 2004 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Col. Ryszard Kuklinski, a Polish army officer who spied on his country and the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact for the CIA during the communist era and later fled to the United States, has died. He was 73. Kuklinski had a stroke Feb. 5 and died Tuesday in a military hospital in Tampa, Fla., said longtime friend Jozef Szaniawski. U.S. officials confirmed his death but would not say where he died.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1997
Re "Poland's Spy Who's Still Out in the Cold," Dec. 17: Almost two generations after Americans rejoiced at the end of WWII, Poland, the country that was the first to fight the evil of Nazism, regained its freedom from the other evil of this century, communism. Just as America required time to rebuild its national character, Poland is struggling to do so now with its own identity. It would be simple but undemocratic to deny Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski the bully pulpit that he continues to enjoy in Poland at the present time.
NEWS
April 28, 1998 | Associated Press
Poland's most famous turncoat made an emotional visit to his homeland Monday after 17 years in exile, defending his actions to a public still divided over whether he is a hero or a traitor. Col. Ryszard Kuklinski, a longtime spy who fled Poland after telling the CIA about the Communist regime's plans to impose martial law, said that he acted in the interest of Polish independence. "We saw the need to escape the Soviet grip.
NEWS
April 28, 1998 | Associated Press
Poland's most famous turncoat made an emotional visit to his homeland Monday after 17 years in exile, defending his actions to a public still divided over whether he is a hero or a traitor. Col. Ryszard Kuklinski, a longtime spy who fled Poland after telling the CIA about the Communist regime's plans to impose martial law, said that he acted in the interest of Polish independence. "We saw the need to escape the Soviet grip.
NEWS
December 17, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere out there in America, one of the great unsung soldiers of the Cold War is still on the run. Eight years have passed since the collapse of the Soviet Bloc, which Ryszard Kuklinski risked his life to help topple. Will Kuklinski--Warsaw Pact colonel and CIA informant--have to stay on the lam forever?
OPINION
December 14, 1997 | Pawel Machcewicz and Malcolm Byrne, Pawel Machcewicz, a Polish historian at the Institute of Political Studies of the Polish Academy of Sciences (Warsaw), is a Fulbright fellow at Georgetown and George Washington Universities. Malcolm Byrne is deputy director of the National Security Archive, a research institution based at George Washington University. The institute and the archive, with the Cold War International History Project, were the main organizers of the Warsaw conference
Imagine if Vladimir I. Lenin and Alexander F. Kerensky had met in the early 1920s, several years after the Russian Revolution, or if Franco and the Spanish republicans had convened in the 1950s to revisit their bloody civil war.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1997
Re "Poland's Spy Who's Still Out in the Cold," Dec. 17: Almost two generations after Americans rejoiced at the end of WWII, Poland, the country that was the first to fight the evil of Nazism, regained its freedom from the other evil of this century, communism. Just as America required time to rebuild its national character, Poland is struggling to do so now with its own identity. It would be simple but undemocratic to deny Gen. Wojciech Jaruzelski the bully pulpit that he continues to enjoy in Poland at the present time.
NEWS
December 17, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere out there in America, one of the great unsung soldiers of the Cold War is still on the run. Eight years have passed since the collapse of the Soviet Bloc, which Ryszard Kuklinski risked his life to help topple. Will Kuklinski--Warsaw Pact colonel and CIA informant--have to stay on the lam forever?
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