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Ryuho Okawa

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1991 | MARI YAMAGUCHI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lights go off. White smoke rises on stage. A round-faced, chubby man in a dark business suit appears in a spotlight before thousands of admirers. He claims he is Japan's Messiah, the reincarnation of Buddha. The man portrays the Japanese as a chosen people destined to destroy the United States and the Soviet Union and make China "a slave."
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1991 | MARI YAMAGUCHI, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Lights go off. White smoke rises on stage. A round-faced, chubby man in a dark business suit appears in a spotlight before thousands of admirers. He claims he is Japan's Messiah, the reincarnation of Buddha. The man portrays the Japanese as a chosen people destined to destroy the United States and the Soviet Union and make China "a slave."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2003 | Kevin Thomas, Times Staff Writer
"The Golden Laws" is a well-meaning but tedious and heavily didactic spiritual odyssey aimed at young people and based on a book with the same title, written by this animated film's executive producer, Ryuho Okawa, founder and leader of the Institute for Research in Human Happiness. It suffers from a mishmash of animation styles and hopelessly stilted dubbed English dialogue. The time and place is New Atlantis, AD 2403.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2012 | By Mark Olsen, Los Angeles Times
Conceived and underwritten by Ryuho Okawa, leader of a Japanese religious group known as Happy Science, the anime film "The Mystical Laws" is a strange mix of action-adventure and religious sermon, "G-Force" meets a Chick tract. Credited to director Isamu Imakake, the film's sincerity in breaking down its religious teachings to a level of digestible, childlike simplicity also makes it reminiscent of those Bible adventure kids cartoons that used to be a staple of Christian cable channels, albeit with a sci-fi twist and Buddhist underpinnings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The big stone needed a little rocking. So the homeless man gently nudged it left and right, and then front to back. The basketball-size hunk of granite seesawed for a moment before coming to a stop--perfectly balanced on top of a delicately stacked pile of stones. Fernando Anglero carefully pulled away his hands and slowly stepped back. "It gives me such pleasure when I find the center," he said. "It brings me peace."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1995 | From Religion News Service
Yuko Higuchi recently quit her high-powered job at an international investment company to work for Kofuku-no-Kagaku, a fast-growing Japanese religion also known as the Institute for Research in Human Happiness. "I was interested in some sort of movement to improve the world," the 35-year-old Higuchi said, "but couldn't find a suitable one." In her view, Buddhism and Shinto--Japan's oldest religions--are spiritually exhausted. "Buddhist temples . . . are for sightseeing.
NEWS
March 26, 1995 | MAGGIE FARLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The head of Science of Happiness, Ryuho Okawa, says he is Buddha reborn, his wife was Florence Nightingale, and a Golden Age will begin in 2020. Of his "revelations," at least one seems to echo the fears of many Japanese these days: Last year, Okawa warned that Aum Supreme Truth--the cult that many suspect killed 10 people last week by releasing poison gas in a Tokyo subway--was trying to destroy the nation.
NEWS
December 7, 1991 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here, by a grove of cherry trees whose thick, dark canopy trembles with a flock of brilliantly white doves, stands the altar of Japanese militarism. The spirits of foot soldiers and generals, cannon fodder and war criminals are enshrined as deities in this place and rest eternally, without judgment, blame or sin. At Yasukuni Jinja, the "Shrine of the Nation at Peace," stoop-backed widows pray for the repose of their husbands who fell in Manchuria.
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