Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRyuichi Koike
IN THE NEWS

Ryuichi Koike

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
December 2, 1997 | Reuters
Corporate racketeer Ryuichi Koike pleaded guilty to extorting tens of millions of dollars from Japan's top financial institutions. On the opening day of his trial in a Tokyo court, Koike admitted receiving payoffs from Big Four brokerages Nomura, Nikko, Daiwa and the now-closed Yamaichi Securities, as well as from leading commercial bank Dai-Ichi Kangyo. Koike, 54, admitted in court that he had demanded compensation and received cash from the institutions.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
December 2, 1997 | Reuters
Corporate racketeer Ryuichi Koike pleaded guilty to extorting tens of millions of dollars from Japan's top financial institutions. On the opening day of his trial in a Tokyo court, Koike admitted receiving payoffs from Big Four brokerages Nomura, Nikko, Daiwa and the now-closed Yamaichi Securities, as well as from leading commercial bank Dai-Ichi Kangyo. Koike, 54, admitted in court that he had demanded compensation and received cash from the institutions.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 5, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Prosecutors charged Nomura Securities Co., Japan's largest brokerage, and two former top executives with illegally compensating a gangster for $430,000 in trading losses. The charges were the first in the scandal, which has widened to include the rest of Japan's Big Four brokerages and Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank Ltd., the nation's third-largest bank.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
Prosecutors charged Nomura Securities Co., Japan's largest brokerage, and two former top executives with illegally compensating a gangster for $430,000 in trading losses. The charges were the first in the scandal, which has widened to include the rest of Japan's Big Four brokerages and Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank Ltd., the nation's third-largest bank.
BUSINESS
September 25, 1997 | Associated Press
Tokyo prosecutors arrested the former president of Yamaichi Securities Co., a major Japanese brokerage. The move followed the arrests last month of five brokerage officials accused of funneling profits to Ryuichi Koike, a suspected racketeer. Prosecutors from the Tokyo District Public Prosecutors Office said Atsuo Miki is suspected of having endorsed $658,000 in payments that were transferred in 1995 to an account held by Koike's younger brother.
BUSINESS
May 20, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
Prosecutors raided the Tokyo offices of Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank on Tuesday to investigate the major bank's possible loans to a corporate racketeer as the Nomura Securities Co. scandal broadened, Japanese media reports said. The raid by more than 100 officers helped drive down Japanese stocks in early trading, led by banks, amid concern that the practices were not to limited Dai-Ichi, traders said.
BUSINESS
July 1, 1997 | From Bloomberg News
Three more Japanese brokerages were accused Monday of making payoffs to a racketeer charged with blackmailing Nomura Securities Co. The lawyer for the reputed racketeer, Ryuichi Koike, 54, said his client's brother, Yoshinori, told him that Daiwa Securities Co., Nikko Securities Co. and Yamaichi Securities Co. had made the illegal payments. Both Koike brothers are under arrest. Spokesmen for the three Tokyo-based securities firms declined to comment.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1997 | (Associated Press)
The former chairman of a major Japanese bank was arrested in connection with a growing racketeering scandal that has jolted this country's financial industry. Tadashi Okuda had already resigned as chairman of Dai-Ichi Kangyo Bank in mid-June as part of a reshuffle of top management aimed at restoring public confidence in the bank. Eleven executives at Dai-Ichi Kangyo, one of the world's largest banks, have now been arrested.
BUSINESS
May 3, 1997 | Associated Press
In an unusual action for Japanese investors, a class-action lawsuit was filed against four former executives of Japan's largest securities company over alleged payoffs to racketeers. The lawsuit against the ex-officers of Nomura Securities Co., filed on behalf of the company's 120,000 shareholders, seeks the return of $555,000, the amount that Nomura was said to pay the gangsters.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1997 | (Bloomberg News)
A Yamaichi Securities Co. executive was stabbed to death, and police were investigating whether the killing may be linked to a payoff scandal involving a racketeer. Koichiro Tarutani, 57, was manager of customer relations at Japan's fourth-largest brokerage, which recently pledged to sever ties with organized crime. The stabbing came three days after the resignation of Yamaichi's chairman, president and nine other executives as they took responsibility for the payoffs.
BUSINESS
September 17, 1997 | Bloomberg News
Japan's securities watchdog said it's seeking an indictment against Yamaichi Securities Co. and five former Yamaichi directors in connection with illegal payments to a corporate racketeer. The Securities and Exchange Surveillance Commission, which regulates the securities industry, also said it's seeking an indictment against Ryuichi Koike, the racketeer. Koike is already charged with extorting $3.1 million from Nomura Securities Co.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|