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Ryutaro Hashimoto

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Former Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, who stood up to the United States in trade negotiations and helped defuse tensions over U.S. military bases in Japan, has died. He was 68. Hashimoto, who was prime minister from January 1996 to July 1998, died Saturday at the International Medical Center of Japan in Tokyo, the hospital said. He had been in critical condition after suffering abdominal pain and undergoing surgery to remove part of his intestines.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Former Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, who stood up to the United States in trade negotiations and helped defuse tensions over U.S. military bases in Japan, has died. He was 68. Hashimoto, who was prime minister from January 1996 to July 1998, died Saturday at the International Medical Center of Japan in Tokyo, the hospital said. He had been in critical condition after suffering abdominal pain and undergoing surgery to remove part of his intestines.
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BUSINESS
October 4, 1991 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Responding to a public outcry over a spate of scandals that have shaken Japan's financial community in the past few months, Finance Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto resigned Thursday to take responsibility for the government's failure to adequately supervise the securities industry. Hashimoto's long-expected resignation came after parliament passed a bill modestly revising the Securities and Exchange Law.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than three years ago, Ryutaro Hashimoto--renowned for his slicked-back hair and hard-line fiscal reforms--resigned as Japan's prime minister after his party's humiliating defeat in a parliamentary election. Several members of his own party said then that they resented his autocratic ways and poor listening skills. Well, Hashimoto's back. Today, he became the odds-on favorite to replace unpopular and gaffe-prone Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori.
NEWS
January 24, 1996 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judged by charisma alone, Japan's new prime minister, Ryutaro Hashimoto, easily surpasses his predecessor, Tomiichi Murayama. The rise to power of the aggressive, ambitious Hashimoto is being widely portrayed, both in Japan and in the United States, as a generational change, signaling the Japanese desire for more dynamic leadership. Yet when judged by the practical realities of policy, Hashimoto's new government will probably not be much different for the United States than the outgoing one.
NEWS
April 12, 2001 | VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than three years ago, Ryutaro Hashimoto--renowned for his slicked-back hair and hard-line fiscal reforms--resigned as Japan's prime minister after his party's humiliating defeat in a parliamentary election. Several members of his own party said then that they resented his autocratic ways and poor listening skills. Well, Hashimoto's back. Today, he became the odds-on favorite to replace unpopular and gaffe-prone Prime Minister Yoshiro Mori.
BUSINESS
June 26, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If American body language is any guide, an agreement that will avert the imposition of punishing tariffs on $5.9 billion worth of imported Japanese luxury cars may be on the horizon. If verbal statements are any indicator, then all bets are off. U.S. negotiators emerged from their fourth day of automotive and auto parts trade talks Sunday appearing relaxed and upbeat compared to previous appearances. U.S. Commerce Undersecretary Jeffrey Garten went so far as to say, "We've had a good morning."
BUSINESS
June 9, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the gray world of Japanese politics and bureaucracy, where vague language and backroom deal making are the norm, Minister of International Trade and Industry Ryutaro Hashimoto stands out like a swashbuckling samurai warrior.
NEWS
July 30, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto drew harsh criticism from China for his visit to a controversial shrine in Tokyo honoring Japanese killed in World War II--as well as several men executed as war criminals. "The way Prime Minister Hashimoto worshiped hurt the feelings of all the people from every country . . . which suffered under the hands of Japanese militarists," a Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman said.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Finance Minister Steps Down: Ryutaro Hashimoto formally bowed out 11 days after submitting his resignation to take responsibility for a string of stock and banking scandals. The minister told Premier Toshiki Kaifu on Oct. 3 that he wished to go. Kaifu asked him to stay on until a series of high-level international finance meetings were completed in Bangkok.
NEWS
July 15, 1998 | SONNI EFRON and JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Japan's next prime minister--whoever he turns out to be--will inherit a legacy of cynicism and skepticism and the mistrust of international financial markets, frustrated foreign governments and an angry Japanese public.
NEWS
July 14, 1998 | SONNI EFRON and VALERIE REITMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
It could take up to eight tumultuous days to choose Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto's successor, and the Japanese fretted Monday that they could face protracted political gridlock and end up with a new government no more capable of swift reform than the one that just fell when Hashimoto resigned.
NEWS
July 13, 1998 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto's defeat in weekend elections injects new uncertainty into the relationship between the United States and Japan just as the Clinton administration was hoping for decisive leadership in Tokyo to turn the Japanese economy around. In recent days, the administration had been laying plans to give a lavish reception to Hashimoto on a state visit to Washington scheduled for July 22. The aim had been to show that the U.S.
NEWS
July 13, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto resigned today, becoming the third Asian leader to be toppled in less than nine months by the regionwide financial crisis, after voters angry over Japan's economic tailspin defied all predictions and turned out in startling numbers to vote against his ruling Liberal Democratic Party.
BUSINESS
July 9, 1998 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing grim poll numbers five days before key parliamentary elections, Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto on Wednesday promised to seek permanent tax cuts next year--but frustrated financial markets by giving no specifics. For months, the U.S. government and international markets have been clamoring for permanent tax cuts to stimulate the moribund Japanese economy--and thus help propel the rest of Asia out of its slump.
BUSINESS
July 6, 1998 | From Reuters
Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto Sunday said permanent income-tax cuts are still a matter of debate, dashing world financial market hopes of swift measures to revive the nation's economy. In a political embarrassment for the prime minister one week before the July 12 national elections, Hashimoto was forced to put to rest last week's campaign comments interpreted to mean that permanent income-tax cuts are possible after the elections.
NEWS
March 8, 1997 | Reuters
Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto, an admitted heavy smoker, was sued Friday by five anti-smokers who said his habit violated the country's constitution guaranteeing a wholesome life. The lawsuit quoted the premier as saying, "Taxes on cigarettes are big revenue sources for the central and local governments. I will smoke as much as possible, while watching my health, and avoid imposing a burden on the medical insurance system budget."
BUSINESS
July 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
Isolated by growing pressure for quick action to fix its anemic economy, Japan's prime minister on Friday said for the first time that he would support a permanent tax cut to stimulate consumer spending. The statement by Ryutaro Hashimoto at a campaign rally for the July 12 parliamentary elections followed his announcement the day before of a long-awaited plan to clean up the country's banking crisis.
NEWS
April 19, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin lived up to his image as a hopeless romantic Saturday when he and Japanese Prime Minister Ryutaro Hashimoto brought flowers and presents to a couple whose wedding was disrupted by their summit at the same hotel. Yeltsin had barely conducted any business at this seaside resort when he swept into the wedding reception, flanked by security agents and with Hashimoto and the two first ladies in tow.
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