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S A Restaurant Corp

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BUSINESS
March 9, 1989 | From Reuters
Grand Metropolitan PLC, Pillsbury's new owner, sliced off another section of the food and restaurant group Wednesday, agreeing to sell the S&A Restaurant Corp. to an investor group including top managers for $431 million. S&A was part of Pillsbury Co., acquired by Grand Met in January. Grand Met has launched a program of cost cuts and asset sales as it attempts to make Pillsbury more profitable. Grand Met said in a statement that the investor group was led by DSJ/Inverness & Co.
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BUSINESS
March 9, 1989 | From Reuters
Grand Metropolitan PLC, Pillsbury's new owner, sliced off another section of the food and restaurant group Wednesday, agreeing to sell the S&A Restaurant Corp. to an investor group including top managers for $431 million. S&A was part of Pillsbury Co., acquired by Grand Met in January. Grand Met has launched a program of cost cuts and asset sales as it attempts to make Pillsbury more profitable. Grand Met said in a statement that the investor group was led by DSJ/Inverness & Co.
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BUSINESS
June 23, 1988
Jerry Levin has replaced Kyle Craig as chairman of Pillsbury's S&A Restaurant Corp., its full-service restaurant subsidiary. The Minneapolis-based food and restaurant giant announced earlier Wednesday that Craig had resigned as head of the unit, which operates the Steak & Ale and Bennigan restaurant chains. Levin previously was executive vice president-corporate development.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1989 | From Times wire services
Grand Metropolitan Plc said today it agreed to sell its Pillsbury subsidiary's S & A Restaurant Corp. to an investor group for $431 million. S & A, with its Steak & Ale and Bennigan's family restaurant chains, was part of U.S. foods giant Pillsbury Co., which Grand Met acquired in January. Grand Met has launched a program of cost cuts and asset sales as it attempts to make Pillsbury more profitable. Grand Met said in a statement the investor group was led by DSJ/Inverness & Co.
BUSINESS
November 11, 1987 | Associated Press
The Pillsbury Co. said that it will eliminate 60 positions at the Dallas headquarters of its S&A Restaurant Corp. as the subsidiary explores the sale of three restaurant chains. The cuts from the 435-person work force at S&A headquarters are indirectly related to the decision to put the developmental restaurant "concepts" of Bay Street, Key West Grill and Innovative Food Services up for sale, said Johnny Thompson, Pillsbury's communications director.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1988
The Pillsbury Co., which has had increasing problems with the performance of its restaurant operations in recent years, has announced the resignation of J. Jeffrey Campbell as chairman and chief executive of the restaurant group. The diversified food concern, based in Minneapolis, which gave no reason for the resignation, later announced a series of management changes.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2008 | Ronald D. White and Jerry Hirsch, White and Hirsch are Times staff writers.
Joseph and Victoria Hurley are the kind of customers that keep restaurateurs up at night. The Hurleys, parents of two young boys, have restructured their lives. The couple -- she's a marketing consultant and he's a much-traveled computer troubleshooter -- dumped their Jeep Grand Cherokee for a Lexus hybrid SUV that gets twice the mileage. Dinners out at places such as the Cheesecake Factory and the Daily Grill are rare treats instead of a weekly habit.
BUSINESS
March 8, 1994 | DAVID DISHNEAU, ASSOCIATED PRESS
He ain't the Colonel. Scott A. Beck, chairman of Boston Chicken Inc., is 35, small, wiry and curt, with piercing hazel eyes. He talks of product, not poultry. He calls his restaurants stores. "We're in the multiunit retail business," Beck said. "We consider it far more specialty retail than we do restaurant." Boston Chicken's plump, rotisserie-roasted birds and home-style side dishes may be the most comforting fast food around.
NEWS
May 12, 1987 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, Times Staff Writer
Roland Wesley sees the American job market from the lowest possible vantage point--the Chicago ghetto, where poverty is rampant and unemployment hovers near 30%. Wesley runs a job placement firm that tries to train and motivate the chronically unemployed to get and hold jobs that typically pay at or near the minimum wage. That, he says, is all his clients--small ghetto businesses--can afford. If they were forced to pay more, they simply would not hire.
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