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September 20, 1987 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
S. Brian Willson would seem to be an unlikely martyr. In his youth he considered becoming a minister, an FBI agent and a professional baseball player. He has been a lawyer, a dairy farmer and a veterans' counselor. But it wasn't until middle age that Willson found his true calling. In his 40s--and long after it was fashionable or popular--the working-class boy from a hamlet near Buffalo, N.Y., became a full-time antiwar activist, a self-styled "peace warrior."
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NEWS
August 9, 1990 | HAROLD MAASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anti-war activist S. Brian Willson and his lawyers say the federal government has tentatively agreed to pay $920,000 to settle a lawsuit filed after a Navy weapons train hit Willson and severed his legs during a 1987 protest. William McGivern, the U.S. attorney in San Francisco, said a settlement proposal has been sent to Justice Department officials for approval, but that a court order prohibited him from saying anything further.
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NEWS
September 2, 1988
A memorial service marking the anniversary of S. Brian Willson's failed bid to halt a Navy munitions train, was marred by blaring horns, obscene chants and signs mocking Willson, who lost his legs when the train struck him. "We came to protest these crazy people," said Jack Withrow, 65, of Sacramento, a World War II veteran among 15 people who appeared at the Concord Naval Weapons Station to oppose the service.
NEWS
August 15, 1989
A federal judge said he was "inclined" to rule against Navy train crew members who filed a countersuit against maimed anti-war protester Brian Willson. Willson, 48, lost both legs and suffered severe head injuries when run over by a Navy munitions train as he lay on the tracks during a massive protest outside the station. Wilson is suing the federal government, the three members of the train crew and other individuals in connection with his Sept.
NEWS
September 25, 1988
Activist S. Brian Willson--maimed when he refused to abandon the railroad tracks as a munitions train bore down on him--can sue three railroad crewmen and civilian officials for the injuries suffered when the train ran over him at the Concord Naval Weapons Station, a judge ruled in San Francisco. Chief District Court Judge Robert Peckham refused to dismiss most of a lawsuit by five activists, including Willson, who lost his legs in the incident on Sept. 1, 1987.
NEWS
December 26, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
An anti-war demonstrator who was run over by a munitions train received a new pair of artificial legs during a Christmas Day celebration at the Naval weapons depot where his limbs were severed. "Obviously, it's a very symbolic spot, for this is where the military madness ran over all of us and I happened to lose my legs," said S. Brian Willson.
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Ten days after he lost both legs and suffered a fractured skull when he was hit by a Navy munitions train, anti-war activist S. Brian Willson said Friday that he "feels no ill will toward the people who were on that train." Willson, 46, making his first public appearance since he was severely injured Sept. 1 while attempting to halt arms shipments to the Nicaraguan contras , said from a wheelchair at John Muir Hospital here that "I have compassion for the train crew."
NEWS
August 9, 1990 | HAROLD MAASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anti-war activist S. Brian Willson and his lawyers say the federal government has tentatively agreed to pay $920,000 to settle a lawsuit filed after a Navy weapons train hit Willson and severed his legs during a 1987 protest. William McGivern, the U.S. attorney in San Francisco, said a settlement proposal has been sent to Justice Department officials for approval, but that a court order prohibited him from saying anything further.
NEWS
September 3, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
A sheriff's official, investigating a military train accident that left an anti-war activist seriously injured, said Wednesday that the Naval Weapons Center here failed to provide deputies with an agreed-upon half-hour to move protesters who were blocking the tracks. "We're certainly asking the question, 'Why they didn't wait for us?' " said Capt. Russ Pitkin, head of the Contra Costa Sheriff's Department investigations division.
NEWS
September 2, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
An anti-war activist, hoping to halt arms shipments to the Nicaraguan contras , was critically injured Tuesday when he was dragged 25 feet by a military train leaving the Concord Naval Weapons Center. S. Brian Willson, 45, beginning what was to be a 40-day fast, was sitting on the railroad tracks outside the base in the East Bay suburb when the train pulling two boxcars left shortly before noon.
NEWS
July 4, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Navy has decided against punishing three crewmen of a munitions train that ran over a protester, severing his legs, in a demonstration at the Concord Naval Weapons Station in California two years ago. Adm. Robert Ailes of the Naval Sea Systems Command overruled the suspensions proposed earlier by a Navy hearing officer, officials said Monday. The admiral said the "mitigating factor" was protester Brian Willson's failure to get out of the way of the train.
NEWS
November 18, 1988 | United Press International
The Navy has recommended a 10-day suspension for the three-man crew of a munitions train that ran over a protester outside the Concord Naval Weapons Station. Train brakeman Bob Mayfield said he received a letter Wednesday telling him that the Navy proposes, as a disciplinary action, to suspend him along with engineer Dave Humiston and conductor Ralph Dawson, The trainmen have 30 days to appeal the proposal and Mayfield said the three plan to fight it. The men were operating the Navy train Sept.
NEWS
September 25, 1988
Activist S. Brian Willson--maimed when he refused to abandon the railroad tracks as a munitions train bore down on him--can sue three railroad crewmen and civilian officials for the injuries suffered when the train ran over him at the Concord Naval Weapons Station, a judge ruled in San Francisco. Chief District Court Judge Robert Peckham refused to dismiss most of a lawsuit by five activists, including Willson, who lost his legs in the incident on Sept. 1, 1987.
NEWS
September 2, 1988
A memorial service marking the anniversary of S. Brian Willson's failed bid to halt a Navy munitions train, was marred by blaring horns, obscene chants and signs mocking Willson, who lost his legs when the train struck him. "We came to protest these crazy people," said Jack Withrow, 65, of Sacramento, a World War II veteran among 15 people who appeared at the Concord Naval Weapons Station to oppose the service.
NEWS
December 26, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
An anti-war demonstrator who was run over by a munitions train received a new pair of artificial legs during a Christmas Day celebration at the Naval weapons depot where his limbs were severed. "Obviously, it's a very symbolic spot, for this is where the military madness ran over all of us and I happened to lose my legs," said S. Brian Willson.
NEWS
September 6, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
In a growing protest over the maiming of an anti-war protester, the wife of Nicaragua's president, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and a crowd of thousands converged Saturday on the dusty spot where Brian Willson's legs were severed when he knelt in front of a military munitions train.
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