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NEWS
November 19, 1987 | Associated Press
A Navy train carrying ammunition was going more than double and possibly triple the 5-m.p.h. speed limit when it struck and maimed an anti-war protester in Northern California, a Navy captain testified Wednesday. "The train was traveling between 12 and 16 m.p.h. when it struck Mr. (S. Brian) Willson" at the Concord Naval Weapons Station, Capt. Stanley J. Pryzby told the House armed services subcommittee on investigations. The speed limit is 5 m.p.h.
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NEWS
November 18, 1987 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
S. Brian Willson is going to Washington on new legs. In his first major venture into the public arena since he was maimed by a munitions train 2 1/2 months ago, the anti-war activist--supported by a $4,500 pair of artificial limbs--is scheduled to appear today at House subcommittee hearings into the Sept. 1 incident at Concord Naval Weapons Station.
NEWS
November 11, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
The Navy disciplined two top officers at the Concord Naval Weapons Station over an incident in which a peace activist was run over by a train during a protest. Capt. Lonnie Cagle, the commander of the weapons station has been given "a punitive letter of admonition" for "negligently" failing to assure the safety of demonstrators during the Sept. 1 incident at the base, a Navy spokesman said Tuesday. Cmdr.
NEWS
September 30, 1987 | Associated Press
Peace activist S. Brian Willson made an emotional return Tuesday to a protest at the Concord Naval Weapons Station, where he lost his legs a month ago trying to block a munitions train, and urged demonstrators to continue efforts to stop arms shipments to Central America. He was greeted enthusiastically by about 200 protesters who were holding hands and singing.
NEWS
September 23, 1987 | DAN MORAIN and MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writers
Contra Costa Dist. Atty. Gary T. Yancey said Tuesday he will not prosecute the crew of the munitions train that severed a man's legs during an anti-war protest earlier this month at the Concord Naval Weapons Station. "There is no evidence that the train crew intended to hit or run over any of the protesters," he said. The decision, he added, came after a "lengthy, in-depth investigation" by the Contra Costa County Sheriff's Department. In the Sept.
NEWS
September 20, 1987 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
S. Brian Willson would seem to be an unlikely martyr. In his youth he considered becoming a minister, an FBI agent and a professional baseball player. He has been a lawyer, a dairy farmer and a veterans' counselor. But it wasn't until middle age that Willson found his true calling. In his 40s--and long after it was fashionable or popular--the working-class boy from a hamlet near Buffalo, N.Y., became a full-time antiwar activist, a self-styled "peace warrior."
NEWS
September 12, 1987 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
Ten days after he lost both legs and suffered a fractured skull when he was hit by a Navy munitions train, anti-war activist S. Brian Willson said Friday that he "feels no ill will toward the people who were on that train." Willson, 46, making his first public appearance since he was severely injured Sept. 1 while attempting to halt arms shipments to the Nicaraguan contras , said from a wheelchair at John Muir Hospital here that "I have compassion for the train crew."
NEWS
September 11, 1987 | United Press International
Some 200 protesters, many in wheelchairs, gathered in front of the U.S. Embassy on Thursday to honor peace activist Brian Willson, who lost his legs when struck by a train while demonstrating against military aid to the contras . The group, mostly Americans, sang protest songs in English and Spanish, prayed, read poetry and listened to a message Willson had recorded from his hospital bed. Willson, who has visited Nicaragua and opposes U.S. aid to the contras, lost his legs Sept.
NEWS
September 6, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
In a growing protest over the maiming of an anti-war protester, the wife of Nicaragua's president, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and a crowd of thousands converged Saturday on the dusty spot where Brian Willson's legs were severed when he knelt in front of a military munitions train.
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