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NEWS
March 22, 1992 | LAUREN LIPTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Creating a "Wonderland for kids of the '90s" is the goal for the folks behind the new series Adventures in Wonderland, premiering this week. Featuring musical numbers, animation, puppetry, miniatures and colorful sets, the show also includes 1990s updates of the "Alice in Wonderland" characters. Tweedle Dum and Tweedle Dee are reincarnated as rappers!
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2004 | Samantha Bonar, Times Staff Writer
If "The Outsiders" author S.E. Hinton and Raymond Chandler had a child, she might be Veronica Mars. The teenage title character of UPN's new one-hour drama, "Veronica Mars," has the outsider angle covered, and she narrates events in a Chandler-esque voice-over. "If there's one thing I've learned in this business, the people you love let you down," the preternaturally cynical Veronica intones.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1985 | DEBORAH CAULFIELD, Times Staff Writer
Whenever Hollywood's newest young Turks talk about one another, Emilio Estevez's name invariably crops up. "Emilio just wrote and starred in his own movie," someone might confide in admiring tones. ("That Was Then, This Is Now," based on the S. E. Hinton novel). "He's re-e-e-a-a-l-ly hot ." Just what kind of cinematic Wunderkind is this 22-year-old actor, whose most recent performance in "The Breakfast Club" has drawn so much critical praise?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2005 | Nancy Ramsey, Special to The Times
WHEN Francis Ford Coppola headed for Tulsa, Okla., in the early 1980s to film S.E. Hinton's "The Outsiders," a novel about alienated teenagers and class conflict, it came at a time in his career that he now likens to being an oil tycoon who'd lost everything. "If you were a wildcat in the oil business and you made a lot of money, then lost all your money, you'd go back to digging the hole," he said this summer, during a brief visit to New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times
Most people who write fiction have day jobs mainly because writing fiction tends to pay poorly and sporadically. But James Franco, who has written a collection of short stories entitled "Palo Alto" (Scribners) is a movie star. So when he landed one of those stories in Esquire this spring, it was part of a package that included a dapper cover-shot. Obviously, this doesn't happen to most newbie fiction writers, or even award-winning fiction writers unless you are Jonathan Franzen. And perhaps Jennifer Weiner and Jodi Picoult can stop being so mad at Franzen and start being mad at Franco ?
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