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S G Rudy Ruderman

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BUSINESS
August 13, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
The Business Week insider trading scandal touched the magazine's own staff for the first time as the publication fired its radio broadcaster Friday for violating the magazine's code of ethics. Business Week spokeswoman Mary McGeachy identified the employee as S. G. (Rudy) Ruderman, 62, who broadcast daily business reports on four radio stations.
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BUSINESS
April 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Seymour (Rudy) Ruderman, former broadcast editor of Business Week magazine, was sentenced Wednesday to six months in prison for trading on inside information obtained from the weekly before it was published. In a brief statement to U.S. District Judge Robert J. Ward, Ruderman expressed regret for "a betrayal of the trust my employers and my audience vested in me."
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BUSINESS
April 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Seymour (Rudy) Ruderman, former broadcast editor of Business Week magazine, was sentenced Wednesday to six months in prison for trading on inside information obtained from the weekly before it was published. In a brief statement to U.S. District Judge Robert J. Ward, Ruderman expressed regret for "a betrayal of the trust my employers and my audience vested in me."
BUSINESS
December 9, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
A radio commentator formerly employed by Business Week magazine pleaded guilty Thursday to two federal criminal charges, admitting that over 2 1/2 years he had regularly made investments based on advance knowledge of which stocks the magazine would recommend. Seymour G. "Rudy" Ruderman, 62, had worked for about seven years at Business Week, providing several radio stations with daily business commentary.
BUSINESS
December 9, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
A radio commentator formerly employed by Business Week magazine pleaded guilty Thursday to two federal criminal charges, admitting that over 2 1/2 years he had regularly made investments based on advance knowledge of which stocks the magazine would recommend. Seymour G. "Rudy" Ruderman, 62, had worked for about seven years at Business Week, providing several radio stations with daily business commentary.
NEWS
August 12, 1988 | Associated Press
Business Week said today it fired its broadcast editor for violating the magazine's code of ethics and possibly trading on advance knowledge of stocks mentioned in issues before they hit the newsstands. S. G. (Rudy) Ruderman, who had broadcast market and business news for Business Week since 1981, failed to disclose to the magazine "all the (stock) trades he made and the full extent of his holdings" in accordance with the ethics code, magazine spokeswoman Mary McGeachy said. McGraw-Hill Inc.
BUSINESS
September 22, 1989 | From Staff and Wires Reports
A former salesman for the company that prints Business Week magazine formally entered a guilty plea Thursday to conspiring to trade on advance information about stocks mentioned in the magazine's influential "Inside Wall Street" column. As reported, Shayne Walters, 32, of Laguna Hills, agreed in August to plead guilty to charges in the Business Week case. He also pleaded guilty to perjury for lying under oath to an investigator of the Securities and Exchange Commission.
BUSINESS
August 13, 1988 | SCOT J. PALTROW, Times Staff Writer
The Business Week insider trading scandal touched the magazine's own staff for the first time as the publication fired its radio broadcaster Friday for violating the magazine's code of ethics. Business Week spokeswoman Mary McGeachy identified the employee as S. G. (Rudy) Ruderman, 62, who broadcast daily business reports on four radio stations.
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