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S Kimberly Belshe

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2003 | Joe Mathews and Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writers
Gov.-elect Arnold Schwarzenegger continued to fill out his government Friday, nominating a hardened veteran of the health policy battles of Gov. Pete Wilson's administration as secretary of the state's Health and Human Services Agency. S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 2003 | Joe Mathews and Tim Reiterman, Times Staff Writers
Gov.-elect Arnold Schwarzenegger continued to fill out his government Friday, nominating a hardened veteran of the health policy battles of Gov. Pete Wilson's administration as secretary of the state's Health and Human Services Agency. S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 1996
Both the headline and the premise of "Wilson Seeks Nuclear Waste Shipment Ban" (June 6) are completely wrong. Gov. Pete Wilson has never sought a ban on the exportation of radioactive waste from California. Nor did the Department of Health Services official you quoted ever advocate a ban. What was described as a "ban" was simply a proposal by this official that the Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Compact Commission, which governs radioactive waste exports, exercise some discretion prior to granting export permits.
OPINION
May 28, 1995
If the findings of Bet Tzedek's study accurately reflect the practices of California's nursing homes, the fact that the Department of Health Services does not receive more complaints about violations of residents' rights is very worrisome ("Rights and the Infirm," May 11). Although the department conducts annual inspections of nursing homes for compliance with residents' rights and other requirements, violations are more often found through the investigations of each and every complaint received about nursing home care.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1994
Your July 25 editorial suggesting the need for annual tuberculosis screening in schools omitted several pertinent facts. First, because the TB skin test is imperfect, universal screening would incorrectly identify a substantial number of children as infected and, therefore, could result in the needless administration of medication to uninfected kids. For these reasons, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and American Academy of Pediatrics recommend annually screening only those children at high risk for TB by virtue of increased exposure to people with the disease.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 3, 1994
Re "Uncertainties Face HMO Plan for Medi-Cal" (March 28): Although any change can be unsettling, Gov. Pete Wilson's initiative to transform Medi-Cal to managed care makes sense--both for beneficiaries and taxpayers. By linking Medi-Cal beneficiaries to mainstream health plans and their network of providers, managed-care delivery systems will improve access to primary health-care services for poor mothers and their children. And through its emphasis on prevention, health education and early intervention, managed care will generate long-term savings for taxpayers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 1994
I am compelled to compliment The Times and Dan Morain on his Oct. 10 article, "Tobacco Giant Quietly Pushes Prop. 188." Morain highlighted the truth behind this devastating and confusing initiative. Philip Morris USA and other tobacco companies are spending more than $7 million to support Proposition 188, under the guise of "Californians for Statewide Smoking Restrictions." The truth is that 188 would preempt or replace local smoking ordinances, replacing them with a more lenient statewide ban that would allow regulated smoking in most places.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1994
Considering how much is at stake, I must respond to Robert Scheer's recent attempt to discredit the federal Environmental Protection Agency's conclusion that environmental tobacco smoke, or secondhand smoke, is responsible for 3,000 lung cancer deaths each year (Column Left, May 29). Scheer's attack was based largely on a report by two economists who questioned the "statistical significance" of the studies reviewed by the EPA. Yet both economists admit they "do not have technical expertise in the physiological and biological transmission mechanisms of disease causing agents."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1997 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County's top education agency will receive a major state grant to combat teen pregnancy, a state official said Thursday, despite its decision to drop Planned Parenthood from the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1998
Overall, California's nursing homes provide better care for their residents now than ever before. However, I also share many concerns expressed by The Times over the quality of care in some individual nursing homes ("In Questionable Health," Jan. 18, "Ailing Nursing Homes," Jan. 25). While some facilities provide excellent care, others are only marginally maintaining compliance with state and federal requirements. To establish an exceptional nursing home requires staff and management who are dedicated to their profession and who practice a philosophy of caring.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1995
The argument that Medi-Cal is being abused by loopholes to allow rich people to receive convalescent care misses the point (July 17). Lots of reasonable people believe that catastrophic illnesses, including convalescent care, should be covered by the government, so that a family should not have to become destitute to pay for such care. When Congress adopted this philosophy a few years ago, it could have provided convalescent care coverage under Medicare, but instead it did so under the Medicaid program (known as Medi-Cal in California)
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