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TRAVEL
August 19, 2007 | By Kimi Yoshino, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
When 6-year-old Ethan Bondick told his mom and dad he wanted to go fly-fishing in Montana, his well-heeled parents were stumped. "We looked at each other and said, 'Oh, god, now what?' " said Gigi Bondick, 37, a "reformed" attorney whose husband works as a private-equity partner in Massachusetts. "We're just not the camping kind of people. We don't pitch tents. We don't cook outdoors. We don't share a bathroom. It's just not going to happen. This is a kid who has never flown anything but first class or stayed anywhere other than a Four Seasons.
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NATIONAL
February 2, 2014 | Ken Dilanian
Early last year, as Edward Snowden was preparing to disclose classified documents he had purloined from National Security Agency computers in Hawaii, the NSA director, Gen. Keith Alexander, was gearing up to sell Congress and the public on a proposal for the NSA to defend private U.S. computer networks against cyber attacks. Alexander wanted to use the NSA's powerful tools to scan Internet traffic for malicious software code. He said the NSA could kill the viruses and other digital threats without reading consumers' private emails, texts and Web searches.
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NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Jenn Harris
Pull up a chair and settle in for our 50 Shades of Food series, where we introduce you to mouthwatering, shiver-inducing, hot, sexy food porn. It's safe-for-work browsing, sure to get your heart racing and your palms a little sweaty, and the only drawback is a possible hunger pang or two after viewing. This week we're featuring a s'mores martini from Karen of the blog Tasty Trials . It's a mixture of two things that are easy to love: booze and s'mores. The cocktail is made with marshmallow vodka, crème de cacao, chocolate syrup and Cool Whip.
WORLD
December 12, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration on Thursday blacklisted more than a dozen companies and individuals for allegedly helping Iran evade international sanctions, in a move aimed at showing it would maintain pressure on Tehran even after an interim nuclear deal reached last month in Geneva. Administration officials described the addition of 17 companies and individuals to the federal blacklist as a sign it would vigorously enforce existing sanctions, which President Obama says were crucial in bringing the Iranian regime to the negotiating table.
FOOD
November 25, 2010 | By Miles Clements, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Some culinary trends come with promises concocted in the vague argot of marketing executives and brand managers. But a few rare ideas spring from something universal. They're the restaurants and recipes that tap into unknown pleasures, manifestations of all our unconscious cravings. Such is the case at Bruxie, a weeks-old stand in Old Towne Orange whose s'mores-stuffed and prosciutto-packed Belgian waffle sandwiches are fulfilling the fantasies of every syrup-soaked childhood and late-night binge.
IMAGE
August 8, 2010 | By Ellen Olivier, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A greater treat than refreshments awaited the audience after the July 31 performance in the New Original Works (NOW) Festival at REDCAT , a.k.a. the Roy and Edna Disney/CalArts Theater in Los Angeles. The evening's artists — having performed hip-hop, contemporary dance and shadow theater in 3-D — joined them to mingle in the lobby. "It's an important part of the experience," said George Lugg, the theater's associate director. According to Lugg, people tend to ask the same general questions at Q&A sessions, starting with "Where do you get your ideas?"
TRAVEL
July 21, 2002
Thomas Curwen's nostalgic Huntington Lake feature ("Lakeside in the High Sierra," July 7) more than did justice to this magnificent wonderland. I was raised in Big Creek in the '40s and '50s and, amazingly, the area has changed little. Especially all those wonderful adventures--backpacking, fishing, hunting, trapping. The writer asked, "I wonder if the children who toast marshmallows for s'mores today will have the same feeling 30 years from now." Yes, Mr. Curwen, they will. RAY HOLM Westlake I was disappointed by your description of Huntington Lake as scruffy and not as pretty as Bass Lake.
FOOD
May 19, 2011
  S'more cupcakes Total time: 1 hour, 20 minutes Servings: Makes 20 cupcakes Note: Graham flour, the coarsely ground whole-wheat flour traditionally used in graham crackers, is available at Whole Foods. You can use semisweet chocolate chips or a coarsely chopped 70% chocolate of your choice. Our recipes, your kitchen: If you try this or any other recipe from the L.A. Times Test Kitchen, we would like to know about it so we can showcase it on our food blog and occasionally in print.
HOME & GARDEN
June 26, 2010 | Chris Erskine
I believe that a Cub Scout campout is the most fun you could ever have. I say that about a lot of things, but this time I'm fairly certain. At a Cub Scout campout, you get all the things you could possibly want out of life — adventure, good company, exquisite dining options. It's relatively cheap too, though I don't have the exact price. Once you include chiropractor care — or factor in the cost of group therapy after a bear attack — the price tends to escalate.
FOOD
October 29, 1992 | DONNA DEANE, TIMES FOOD STYLIST
Remember s'mores? I ate them in Girl Scouts, melting marshmallows over the campfire and sandwiching them between graham crackers. This S'mores Cake is perfect for Halloween. Watch out, kids, grown-ups will gobble them up too--especially after they learn each serving contains only 2 grams of fat. Applesauce replaces the fat in this cake. We used lots of marshmallows since they are fat-free. The chocolate chips may be cut down if you wish to reduce the fat even further.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By David Lauter
WASHINGTON - Nationwide public opinion on abortion has remained largely unchanged for the last two decades, but that overall steadiness masks a widened gap between conservative and liberal parts of the country, new polling data indicate. Opposition to legal abortion has significantly increased since the mid-1990s in the most antiabortion part of the country, the south-central swath of states that stretches from Alabama, Tennessee and Kentucky west to Texas and Oklahoma, according to new data released by the Pew Research Center.
BUSINESS
July 26, 2013 | By Lew Sichelman
With interest rates slowly on the rise, that means bad news for home buyers and good news for renters, right? After all, aren't the single-family and multifamily markets countercyclical? In the words of the old song, it ain't necessarily so. Here's why: The number of renters increased more than 1.1 million during 2011-12. That marked the eighth straight year of expansion, according to a Harvard University study, which finds that there is currently an "unprecedented strength of rental demand.
BUSINESS
July 25, 2013 | By Kathleen Hennessey
WASHINGTON - President Obama urged Republican lawmakers Thursday to approve billions of dollars in new federal spending on roads, bridges and ports as he continued for a second day to try to build momentum for his stalled economic proposals. Speaking at the port in Jacksonville, Fla., Obama laid out a broad case for spending on infrastructure, arguing that it would ripple through the economy, boost the still-struggling middle class and make U.S. businesses more competitive. "If we don't make the necessary investments to ensure that America's a magnet for good jobs - investments in education, manufacturing, research, and transportation and information networks - we're just waving the white flag of surrender to other countries as they forge ahead in this global economy," Obama said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2013 | By Cindy Chang, Los Angeles Times
American companies are so eager to hire highly skilled foreign workers that a cap on new visas has been reached within a matter of days. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services announced Friday that it has received more than 85,000 applications from employers seeking visas for computer programmers, engineers, physicians and other educated workers with specialized skills. Of the total visas, 20,000 are set aside for people with graduate degrees from American universities. Because the 85,000 limit was exceeded within five days of the April 1 opening date, a lottery will be held to distribute the visas.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 2012 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times
For the first time in 12 years as an educator, Yuri Hronsky taught - and actively participated in - American civics. The Ilan Ramon Day School principal voted for the first time as an American citizen Tuesday. "I wanted to be an example to my students and my children," said Hronsky, who came to the United States from his native Canada in 2001. "It was time to fully engage and practice what I preach. " Hronsky had been living in the U.S. as a legal resident for more than a decade with his wife and three young children - all born in the United States - when he decided to become a citizen.
NATIONAL
October 18, 2012 | By Richard A. Serrano, Los Angeles Times
FT. MEADE, Md. - Government prosecutors in the Sept. 11 conspiracy case broadened their request for secrecy Thursday by asking for more restrictions against the public release of sensitive law enforcement material collected in the sweeping investigation into the 2001 terrorist attacks. Edward Ryan, a Justice Department prosecutor, said the government was prepared to turn over more than 200,000 separate documents to defense lawyers as part of the legal discovery process, but asked the military commission judge to bar the public release of much of that material to protect secret law enforcement investigative techniques and information about clandestine terrorist activities.
SCIENCE
October 16, 2012 | By Monte Morin
The question of whether or not global warming influences the strength or frequency of hurricanes is a matter of heated scientific debate. Though some climate scientists argue that increased sea surface temperature and cyclone activity are linked, others say the evidence is ambiguous at best. Some contend that news media distortions and a lack of historical, standardized hurricane data only make it seem like the storms are worse. Now, a new study is likely to stoke the debate even further.
NEWS
July 30, 2013 | By David Lauter
WASHINGTON - Nationwide public opinion on abortion has remained largely unchanged for the last two decades, but that overall steadiness masks a widened gap between conservative and liberal parts of the country, new polling data indicate. Opposition to legal abortion has significantly increased since the mid-1990s in the most antiabortion part of the country, the south-central swath of states that stretches from Alabama, Tennessee and Kentucky west to Texas and Oklahoma, according to new data released by the Pew Research Center.
SCIENCE
October 16, 2012 | By Monte Morin
The question of whether or not global warming influences the strength or frequency of hurricanes is a matter of heated scientific debate. Though some climate scientists argue that increased sea surface temperature and cyclone activity are linked, others say the evidence is ambiguous at best. Some contend that news media distortions and a lack of historical, standardized hurricane data only make it seem like the storms are worse. Now, a new study is likely to stoke the debate even further.
OPINION
September 16, 2012
A new Census Bureau report confirms that the slowly rising tide of the U.S. economy hasn't lifted all boats. The 20% of Americans with the highest incomes captured an even larger share of the earnings in 2011, while the rest collected the same share or less. The widening income inequality is disturbing, but as the report shows, things could have been considerably worse. Without such safety net programs as unemployment benefits and food stamps, millions more families would have fallen into poverty.
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