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ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
As he was preparing last May to exchange his job heading the NBC Entertainment Group for the chairmanship of Paramount Pictures, Brandon Tartikoff mentioned that he had been watching a lot of television while recovering from injuries suffered in an auto crash. And he added about the medium that he'd been so influential in shaping for more than a decade that he didn't like what he saw, lamenting the "endless sea of sitcoms and reality shows" on the networks.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1994 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
"Ozzie doesn't live here anymore." That line from a new book about the cultural impact of television is hardly news to viewers to whom Ozzie, Harriet, Rick and David Nelson came to symbolize a prime-time generation of fantasy innocence. But the book, "Prime Time: How TV Portrays American Culture," by S. Robert Lichter, Linda S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1994 | RICK DU BROW, TIMES TELEVISION WRITER
"Ozzie doesn't live here anymore." That line from a new book about the cultural impact of television is hardly news to viewers to whom Ozzie, Harriet, Rick and David Nelson came to symbolize a prime-time generation of fantasy innocence. But the book, "Prime Time: How TV Portrays American Culture," by S. Robert Lichter, Linda S.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1991 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
As he was preparing last May to exchange his job heading the NBC Entertainment Group for the chairmanship of Paramount Pictures, Brandon Tartikoff mentioned that he had been watching a lot of television while recovering from injuries suffered in an auto crash. And he added about the medium that he'd been so influential in shaping for more than a decade that he didn't like what he saw, lamenting the "endless sea of sitcoms and reality shows" on the networks.
BOOKS
October 12, 1986 | Michael Schudson, Schudson is author of "Discovering the News: A Social History of American Newspapers." and
The authors of this new book are the media critic darlings of neo-conservatives. For nine years, social scientists Stanley Rothman, Robert Lichter and Linda Lichter have pursued the hypothesis that the "media elite" (journalists who work for the networks, the news weeklies, The New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal) are "liberals."
OPINION
January 22, 2006
Do Democrats and liberals dominate college campuses in the United States? Here's what some studies show: Among faculties * Academics who identified themselves as left or liberal in 1984: 39% in 1999: 72% * Academics who identified themselves as right or conservative in 1984: 34% in 1999: 15% * Among faculties in 1999, Democrats outnumbered Republicans 5 to 1 * The Democratic advantage by department in 1999 English: 35 to 1 History: 17.
NEWS
October 5, 2012 | By James Rainey
Presidential debate moderator Jim Lehrer has taken a lot of flak for letting President Obama and Mitt Romney walk all over him in their first encounter Wednesday night. A study of the debate suggests that the two candidates were more aggressive than in 2008, when Obama debated Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) in front of the same moderator. The Center for Media and Public Affairs at George Mason University counted a total of 30 times that Obama and Romney interrupted Lehrer this week.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1999 | LEE MARGULIES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the exception of teachers and police officers, government workers are generally portrayed unfavorably on prime-time entertainment television series--a situation that has been getting worse in recent years, according to a new study being released today.
NEWS
May 16, 1989 | SUSAN PAGE, Newsday
In what his allies might consider progress of sorts, the many jokes about Vice President Dan Quayle have been getting kinder and gentler. "At first the jokes had a nasty edge, the spoiled-rich-kid-draft-dodger-cheat," said S. Robert Lichter, co-director of the Center for Media and Public Affairs, which monitors not only the television networks' evening news broadcasts but also NBC's "Tonight" show to assess what the public hears over the airwaves....
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2000 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Popular entertainment remains rife with sexual content but seldom explores potential consequences of such behavior, according to a study conducted by the Center for Media and Public Affairs. The Washington, D.C.
BOOKS
October 12, 1986 | Michael Schudson, Schudson is author of "Discovering the News: A Social History of American Newspapers." and
The authors of this new book are the media critic darlings of neo-conservatives. For nine years, social scientists Stanley Rothman, Robert Lichter and Linda Lichter have pursued the hypothesis that the "media elite" (journalists who work for the networks, the news weeklies, The New York Times, Washington Post, and Wall Street Journal) are "liberals."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 1999 | JUDITH MICHAELSON
TV & RADIO No Kidding: Late-night television comedians made President Clinton the punch line of more jokes in 1998 than in any other year of his presidency, according to the nonpartisan, nonprofit Center for Media and Public Affairs in Washington. Fueled by the ever-expanding sex scandal, the number of jokes more than doubled from the previous year, up 111%.
NEWS
October 12, 1991 | ALAN C. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Are you a scorned woman?" Sen. Howell Heflin (D-Ala.) asked Oklahoma law professor Anita Faye Hill under the glare of network television cameras and an audience of millions. "No," replied Hill, who has alleged that Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas sexually harassed her when he was her boss. "Do you have a martyr complex?" Heflin subsequently asked. This time Hill responded with laughter. "No, I don't," she said. For television expert S.
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