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June 13, 1999 | MARISA ROBERTSON-TEXTOR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Welland Rudd isn't a typical American. He's never eaten Thanksgiving turkey or watched fireworks on the Fourth of July. At 52, he has yet to set foot on U.S. soil. Rudd isn't a typical Russian, either. Although he speaks the language fluently and has lived his whole life in Moscow, he cuts an unusual figure here. What sets him apart is the cafe-au-lait color of his skin.
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NEWS
April 24, 2014 | By Olga Grigoryants, guest blogger
After pro-Russia forces entered Crimea this year, many of my American friends were aghast and worried that the situation might escalate. But in Russia, where I grew up, it's an alternate universe.  My friends and family are outraged at those who oppose the intrusion. Instead of being appalled by the violence threatening Ukraine's sovereignty, they are irate about Western critiques of President Vladimir Putin and his policies. Every time I post something supporting Ukraine on Facebook, such as a recent article about members of pro-Russia forces attacking opposition leaders in Crimea, my Russian friends lash out, calling me brainwashed.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1994
The Medical Board of California licenses physicians and other medical professionals. It also investigates complaints about medical treatment and issues disciplinary actions. The most serious penalties include license revocation, suspension and probation. These are the Los Angeles County medical professionals subject to serious disciplinary actions between Nov. 1, 1993, and Jan. 31, 1994, according to medical board documents. Final actions are published only after all appeals are exhausted.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The HTC One (M8) is now on sale, and soon, it will be joined by the Samsung Galaxy S5. Along with the iPhone 5s, consumers will soon have quite a few top devices to choose from. Here's how the three devices stack up. Screen Users who simply want the largest screen possible should go with the Galaxy S5. The Samsung device features a 5.1-inch, full 1080p HD screen. In second place is the HTC One (M8), which features a slightly smaller, 5-inch 1080p HD screen. The iPhone 5s is much smaller than its rivals, with just a 4-inch high-resolution Retina screen.
FOOD
February 4, 1998
There are now about five annual hot sauce contests around the country. The oldest is conducted by the International Fiery Foods Assn. in Albuquerque, where this year a panel of New Mexico's top chefs judged 250 sauces from 24 states.
BUSINESS
December 14, 2008 | Kathy M. Kristof, Kristof is a personal-finance author and syndicated columnist.
Looking for cash to tide you over during these lean times? The Treasury Department is urging Americans to quiz their parents and grandparents this holiday season about whether they squirreled away U.S. savings bonds that have stopped earning interest. The reason: About $16 billion of these bonds haven't been redeemed. The government suspects that the owners have either died or forgotten about the investments that they bought in the 1940s, '50s, '60s and '70s.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 31, 1989 | MYRON LEVIN, Times Staff Writer
In the black depths of the ocean near the Channel Islands lies a largely forgotten memento of the early nuclear age. It is low-level radioactive waste generated at Rockwell International's Santa Susana Field Laboratory and Canoga Park plants. For about a decade starting in the early 1950s, Atomics International, later part of Rockwell, dumped hundreds of drums of radioactive waste in 6,000 feet of water south of Santa Cruz Island. Today, precise information on the dump is hard to come by. Old U.
IMAGE
September 23, 2012 | By Alexandra Drosu
Every few months a new beauty trend, treatment or potion is revealed - the latest skin-tightening laser, an age-defying ingredient or a longer-lasting filler. But should a fresh-faced 20-year-old be using retinol creams? And when is the right time to consider Botox? In the day of instant gratification, where do we draw the line between too soon and too late? We asked some experts for advice. The 20s In your 20s, wearing sunblock is the most important step you can take to prevent sun damage that leads to fine lines and wrinkles, says Dr. Simon Ourian, a dermatologist and founder of Epione Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2012 | By August Brown
If the S.S. Coachella is going to last, it's going to need its own rituals. On the night before the inaugural Coachella cruise sets off (I'm currently pregaming in a Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., hotel room) I'm missing all the usual signposts of an impending Coachella back in California. The buying of sunglasses, the selection of driving music for the 10, the debates about after-parties and the congratulations-you-made-it-to-Indio rounds at the Beer Hunter bar (OK, maybe that last one is just me)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2012 | By August Brown
It's 9 a.m. off Nassau on Tuesday, and a few dozen yellowtail snappers, angelfish and loggerhead turtles are gliding just a few feet below. The water's brisk, the air is warm and six hours ago I was watching a guy in full-body lemur costume raving his face off to the Gaslamp Killer by the rooftop pool. Never say there's no wildlife onboard the S.S. Coachella. Today is shore excursion day, where we finally get a quick breather from the inevitable cabin fever that's taken hold.  Last night went long -- an unexpectedly crisp and clear set from Sleigh Bells, a midnight screening of the awesomely gruesome ocean-liner horror flick “Ghost Ship” with Gregg Gillis of Girl Talk (“The first 10 minutes are tight as heck,” he said.
OPINION
August 23, 2013
Re “Plan to end Filner scandal is reached,” Aug. 22 Having the citizens of San Diego pay the legal tab for Mayor Bob Filner's sexual indiscretions would be another travesty. He should just go away quietly, having used well more than his 15 minutes of fame. Anne Proffit Long Beach “The San Diego mayor will leave office in exchange for the city paying some or all of his legal fees, sources say.” This is the perfect solution to the problem facing the city and its citizens.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Literary tourists traveling to New York have long been drawn to the Algonquin Hotel , the site of the famed Algonquin Roundtable. Full disclosure: "Literary tourists" include me -- I've been there more than once to have a martini in its lounge. The Algonquin was where a group of writers, wits and key literary figures met starting in 1919 to eat, argue and, of course, drink. Dorothy Parker, the petite poet with an acid pen and a hollow leg, was one of its stalwarts. So was Robert Benchley, one of his generation's most popular humorists; Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Edna Ferber; writer, editor and producer George S. Kaufman, winner of two Pulitzers; New York Times drama critic Alexander Woollcott; and Harold Ross, who, midway through the Roundtable's eight-year run, founded the New Yorker magazine.
NEWS
May 8, 2013 | By Michael A. Memoli
WASHINGTON -- Mark Sanford said his surprisingly strong victory in a special election Tuesday is a testament to South Carolina's forgiving tradition, and he vowed to be a watchdog for taxpayers in his district when he returns to Congress. Sanford, whose political career appeared over when he left the governor's office in 2011 hobbled by the fallout of an extramarital affair, defeated Democrat Elizabeth Colbert Busch by 9 percentage points in the 1st District race. The winning margin was wider than expected despite the region's strong GOP tilt.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By August Brown
On the last night of the S.S. Coachella, Josh Tillman sat before a couple of dozen fiction fans, a rare sight on a ship devoted to irony-soaked hedonism. They'd assembled in Michael's, the manly smoking-jacket-and-Scotch bar aboard the ship, for an event drolly billed as “Father John Misty reads selections from his favorite works of literature.” But Tillman, the singer-songwriter behind FJM, read from the novella printed in nearly illegible font in the liner notes of his album “Fear Fun.”  It's a smart, bitterly amusing story about a guy sent to hell, where Satan  shows him how to get around the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2012 | By August Brown
It's 9 a.m. off Nassau on Tuesday, and a few dozen yellowtail snappers, angelfish and loggerhead turtles are gliding just a few feet below. The water's brisk, the air is warm and six hours ago I was watching a guy in full-body lemur costume raving his face off to the Gaslamp Killer by the rooftop pool. Never say there's no wildlife onboard the S.S. Coachella. Today is shore excursion day, where we finally get a quick breather from the inevitable cabin fever that's taken hold.  Last night went long -- an unexpectedly crisp and clear set from Sleigh Bells, a midnight screening of the awesomely gruesome ocean-liner horror flick “Ghost Ship” with Gregg Gillis of Girl Talk (“The first 10 minutes are tight as heck,” he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2012 | By August Brown
Give Goldenvoice honcho Paul Tollett credit -- he knows how fans feel at the end of his festivals. "You need a full weekend. By day three, you're tired, you're hungry, and you're cursing Coachella. But then the sun sets and you're like 'Oh, that's what this is all about.'" That's about how the passengers on the S.S. Coachella are feeling on their second night. Tollett made those comments at an afternoon panel discussion with several upper-brass staffers at Goldenvoice and KCRW's Jason Bentley, and he's right about how festivals have a rhythm of pleasure and pain that needs to be seen to the end. That's why Coachella has become an all-in three-day package, and why the S.S. Coachella is proving more and more a logical extension of that idea.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2012 | By August Brown
There might be no richer musical irony than hearing Pulp play "Common People" onboard a luxury cruise liner. A Brit pop laceration of slumming art-school dilettantes performed to a room full of absolutely hammered music-biz wheeler-dealers en route to the Bahamas. The song is part of a rich seam of accidental poignance aboard the S.S. Coachella. A certain level of self-awareness is necessary to keep your bearings out here because the S.S. Coachella is primarily populated by the L.A. music industry's one-percenters descending into pure indulgence.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2012 | By August Brown
On the last night of the S.S. Coachella, Josh Tillman sat before a couple of dozen fiction fans, a rare sight on a ship devoted to irony-soaked hedonism. They'd assembled in Michael's, the manly smoking-jacket-and-Scotch bar aboard the ship, for an event drolly billed as “Father John Misty reads selections from his favorite works of literature.” But Tillman, the singer-songwriter behind FJM, read from the novella printed in nearly illegible font in the liner notes of his album “Fear Fun.”  It's a smart, bitterly amusing story about a guy sent to hell, where Satan  shows him how to get around the place.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 2012 | By August Brown
There might be no richer musical irony than hearing Pulp play "Common People" onboard a luxury cruise liner. A Brit pop laceration of slumming art-school dilettantes performed to a room full of absolutely hammered music-biz wheeler-dealers en route to the Bahamas. The song is part of a rich seam of accidental poignance aboard the S.S. Coachella. A certain level of self-awareness is necessary to keep your bearings out here because the S.S. Coachella is primarily populated by the L.A. music industry's one-percenters descending into pure indulgence.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2012 | By August Brown
If the S.S. Coachella is going to last, it's going to need its own rituals. On the night before the inaugural Coachella cruise sets off (I'm currently pregaming in a Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., hotel room) I'm missing all the usual signposts of an impending Coachella back in California. The buying of sunglasses, the selection of driving music for the 10, the debates about after-parties and the congratulations-you-made-it-to-Indio rounds at the Beer Hunter bar (OK, maybe that last one is just me)
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