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Saad Faqih

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WORLD
July 12, 2005 | Ken Silverstein, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration has labeled Dr. Saad Faqih a terrorist and supporter of Osama bin Laden. The Saudi government accuses him of involvement in an alleged plot to assassinate Crown Prince Abdullah. But Faqih, a fierce opponent of the Saudi royal family who fled the kingdom in 1994, has thus far had few troubles with the authorities in Britain, his adopted home.
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NEWS
June 28, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a year after a truck bomb blasted the Khobar Towers military housing complex in Saudi Arabia, killing 19 American service personnel, a leading Saudi dissident insists that U.S. investigators are being deceived into accepting a false explanation for the attack.
NEWS
November 14, 1995 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a year of an increasingly ruthless government crackdown on dissent, the eruption of violence in Saudi Arabia was almost predictable, Persian Gulf specialists said Monday. Tensions have been higher recently than at any time since 1979, when the Grand Mosque in Mecca was seized for two weeks by Islamic extremists. U.S.
NEWS
November 15, 1998 | EILEEN ALT POWELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
With King Fahd in failing health and the economy in a tailspin, Saudis are having to do some uncharacteristic soul searching about the future. There have been public calls--even from within the royal family--for reforms such as creation of an elected parliament and clearer guidelines for succession to the throne.
WORLD
July 10, 2005 | Greg Miller and Ken Silverstein, Times Staff Writers
The bombings in London last week may mark the first strike by Osama bin Laden's terrorist network on a city that had already served as a catalyst and crossroads for Al Qaeda operatives involved in plots targeting the United States and other nations. Radical members of London's large Muslim population have been linked to a series of plots, including the Sept. 11 attacks, the attempted shoe bombing of a transatlantic flight to Miami in December 2001 and last year's deadly train bombings in Madrid.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The latest and perhaps most dangerous challenge to the House of Saud is a portable telephone that Mohammed al Massari carries in his pocket around the fashionable hotel lobbies, restaurants and offices of London.
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