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BUSINESS
October 13, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
After an 11-year ride as Yamaha Motor Corp.'s advertising agency, Chiat/Day hit a brick wall on Wednesday. Yamaha dropped the Venice ad firm and handed its estimated $6-million motorcycle account to the Torrance-based agency, Saatchi & Saatchi DFS. Saatchi--which creates advertising for Toyota--already handles advertising for Yamaha's snowmobile division.
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BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | From United Press International
Saatchi & Saatchi Sues Insurer: The ad agency sued New Hampshire Insurance Co. for refusing to pay for its defense in a number of investor lawsuits pending in federal court. The Los Angeles Superior Court suit said New Hampshire Insurance issued a directors and officers liability policy, agreeing to indemnify them against most legal claims.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oh, what a feeling to advertise Toyota. Just ask executives at the Torrance agency Saatchi & Saatchi DFS/Pacific, which on Thursday won another $20-million chunk of Toyota business. Its newest client is Southeast Toyota Distributors Inc., of Deerfield Beach, Fla. The group is responsible for Toyota vehicles distributed in five Southern states. Saatchi's Los Angeles office will open branch offices in Ft. Lauderdale and Atlanta to service the new client.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1988
I read with great disappointment the April 6 story regarding the firing of the advertising agency, Saatchi & Saatchi DFS, by RJR Nabisco over "philosophical differences" related to the ad firm's Northwest Airlines campaign. This campaign was neither related to nor detrimental to Nabisco products. I always have viewed the diversification of tobacco companies into other businesses as reasonable and necessary for their survival against the day when tobacco revenue would decrease or cease.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When an ad agency goes down the tubes, the general public rarely notices. But when that agency happens to employ two co-stars of the popular ABC television show "thirtysomething," plenty of people notice--even if the agency is only real in a TV script. During the past few weeks, the show has been tackling one of the most feared issues in the ad business: What happens when your biggest client dumps you?
BUSINESS
June 25, 1990 | From United Press International
Saatchi & Saatchi Sues Insurer: The ad agency sued New Hampshire Insurance Co. for refusing to pay for its defense in a number of investor lawsuits pending in federal court. The Los Angeles Superior Court suit said New Hampshire Insurance issued a directors and officers liability policy, agreeing to indemnify them against most legal claims.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Oh, what a feeling to advertise Toyota. Just ask executives at the Torrance agency Saatchi & Saatchi DFS/Pacific, which on Thursday won another $20-million chunk of Toyota business. Its newest client is Southeast Toyota Distributors Inc., of Deerfield Beach, Fla. The group is responsible for Toyota vehicles distributed in five Southern states. Saatchi's Los Angeles office will open branch offices in Ft. Lauderdale and Atlanta to service the new client.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
Burger King introduced a new double on Thursday--not a burger but a double bill of New York ad agencies to handle its $215-million advertising business. The unusual move places the agency D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles in charge of Burger King's corporate "image" advertising and hands Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising the task of creating ads for the Miami-based fast-food chain's individual products. "I'm a big believer in doing the unexpected," said Gary L. Langstaff, Burger King's executive vice president of marketing.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
When an ad agency goes down the tubes, the general public rarely notices. But when that agency happens to employ two co-stars of the popular ABC television show "thirtysomething," plenty of people notice--even if the agency is only real in a TV script. During the past few weeks, the show has been tackling one of the most feared issues in the ad business: What happens when your biggest client dumps you?
BUSINESS
October 13, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
After an 11-year ride as Yamaha Motor Corp.'s advertising agency, Chiat/Day hit a brick wall on Wednesday. Yamaha dropped the Venice ad firm and handed its estimated $6-million motorcycle account to the Torrance-based agency, Saatchi & Saatchi DFS. Saatchi--which creates advertising for Toyota--already handles advertising for Yamaha's snowmobile division.
BUSINESS
April 17, 1988
I read with great disappointment the April 6 story regarding the firing of the advertising agency, Saatchi & Saatchi DFS, by RJR Nabisco over "philosophical differences" related to the ad firm's Northwest Airlines campaign. This campaign was neither related to nor detrimental to Nabisco products. I always have viewed the diversification of tobacco companies into other businesses as reasonable and necessary for their survival against the day when tobacco revenue would decrease or cease.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1989 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
Burger King introduced a new double on Thursday--not a burger but a double bill of New York ad agencies to handle its $215-million advertising business. The unusual move places the agency D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles in charge of Burger King's corporate "image" advertising and hands Saatchi & Saatchi Advertising the task of creating ads for the Miami-based fast-food chain's individual products. "I'm a big believer in doing the unexpected," said Gary L. Langstaff, Burger King's executive vice president of marketing.
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