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NEWS
November 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A member of Kuwait's ruling Sabah family and former minister called on the country's silent majority to rise up and quell the growing Islamist influence in the oil-rich state. In remarks published Saturday, Sheikh Saud al Sabah, oil and information minister in governments from 1992 to 2001, also called for blocking efforts in parliament to amend the criminal code with the strict Islamic sharia law.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sheik Saad Al Abdullah Al Sabah, 78, a former Kuwaiti emir who ruled the small oil-rich kingdom for nine days in 2006 before being removed because of ill health, died Tuesday in Kuwait City, state television reported. As crown prince, Saad automatically became ruler when his distant cousin and then emir, Sheik Jaber Al Ahmed Al Sabah, died Jan. 15, 2006. But it became increasingly clear that Saad's poor health would not allow him to carry out his new responsibilities. His health started deteriorating after he suffered colon bleeding in 1997.
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NEWS
December 26, 1987 | From Reuters
Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak will soon pay an official visit to Kuwait, which resumed diplomatic relations with Cairo last month, Kuwaiti Ambassador Abdel Razak Kandari disclosed. Kandari told reporters Thursday after meeting Mubarak that the Egyptian leader had accepted an invitation from Kuwait's emir, Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah.
WORLD
December 5, 2002 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Israel on Wednesday killed a Palestinian militant it blamed for making powerful bombs that blew up three mammoth battle tanks this year, leaving seven soldiers dead and sending shock waves through the Israeli military establishment. The strike on 35-year-old Mustafa Sabah, who was affiliated with a relatively small Palestinian militant group, was swift and decisively lethal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Sheik Saad Al Abdullah Al Sabah, 78, a former Kuwaiti emir who ruled the small oil-rich kingdom for nine days in 2006 before being removed because of ill health, died Tuesday in Kuwait City, state television reported. As crown prince, Saad automatically became ruler when his distant cousin and then emir, Sheik Jaber Al Ahmed Al Sabah, died Jan. 15, 2006. But it became increasingly clear that Saad's poor health would not allow him to carry out his new responsibilities. His health started deteriorating after he suffered colon bleeding in 1997.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | From Reuters
The Emir of Kuwait awarded a medal to Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, on Monday for his role in freeing his country from Iraqi occupation. The official Kuwait News Agency said that Powell, on his first visit to the emirate, received the Medal of Excellence from Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah. Powell, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, is the most prominent American to come to Kuwait since a triumphal visit by former President George Bush in April.
NEWS
April 18, 1988 | Times Wire Services
A member of Kuwait's Royal Family spoke today from the hijacked Kuwaiti jetliner and pleaded with his government to yield to the gunmen's demands to end the two-week ordeal. Most of the brief radio message from Fadel Khaled al Sabah was impossible to understand, except for the part about their demand that Kuwait free 17 pro-Iranian prisoners convicted in the 1983 attacks on the U.S. and French embassies in the Persian Gulf sheikdom.
NEWS
April 20, 1988 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
Hijackers holding a Kuwaiti jumbo jet at Algiers airport put one of their royal hostages on the cockpit radio Tuesday to make another appeal to Kuwait to meet their demand for the release of 17 convicted terrorists. As the hijacking entered its third week, there was no outward sign of progress in the negotiations to end the ordeal for the 31 hostages, who include three members of Kuwait's ruling family.
NEWS
February 4, 1985 | From Reuters
Princess Faria al Sabah of Kuwait was given a six-month suspended sentence and fined $2,200 today for thrashing two maids with electric cable and a riding crop. "Your conduct was disgraceful, verging on the barbaric," Judge John Hayman told the 30-year-old princess, who admitted beating the servants for such offenses as sweeping too slowly. "In this country we no longer have maids, let alone assault them," the judge said.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government is freeing frozen Kuwaiti assets to allow the country's government-in-exile to pay for official expenses and, almost certainly, to reimburse Turkey for the heavy economic losses expected from that nation's trade embargo against Iraq. "We have already freed up the money for them to do their own government business," said Barbara Clay, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Treasury Department. The Treasury is in charge of enforcing the freeze on Kuwaiti assets in the United States.
NEWS
November 11, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
A member of Kuwait's ruling Sabah family and former minister called on the country's silent majority to rise up and quell the growing Islamist influence in the oil-rich state. In remarks published Saturday, Sheikh Saud al Sabah, oil and information minister in governments from 1992 to 2001, also called for blocking efforts in parliament to amend the criminal code with the strict Islamic sharia law.
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 30,000 square feet of leading-edge computer technology on display featured Gateway's cow booth, Palm Pilot's "cool, capable, connected" exhibit, a dizzying array of Compaqs, Packard Bells and Acers, and even the Koran on CD-ROM in six languages. But in a hall filled this week with Arab rock music, giant Showtime screens and well-heeled consumers, Kuwait's two privately owned Internet service providers were among the biggest draws here at the Info-Connect 2001 Expo.
NEWS
February 26, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The political trend in East Asia seems clearly headed toward the one-party state. Indonesia and Singapore are just two examples of countries under the authoritarian rule of single-party governments that promise the voters economic growth and jobs instead of liberal democracy. China, Vietnam and even Myanmar are finding much that they like about this new political hybrid. Malaysia, another of Asia's fast-growing economies, seemed well down the road to a one-party state as well.
NEWS
July 13, 1993 | From Reuters
The Emir of Kuwait awarded a medal to Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, on Monday for his role in freeing his country from Iraqi occupation. The official Kuwait News Agency said that Powell, on his first visit to the emirate, received the Medal of Excellence from Sheik Jabbar al Ahmed al Sabah. Powell, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, is the most prominent American to come to Kuwait since a triumphal visit by former President George Bush in April.
NEWS
May 12, 1992 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One is glitzy, popular, upwardly mobile and if it were human would probably munch on an American hamburger. The other is older, wise and respected but racked by a midlife crisis that may yet drive it to ruin. They are both Turkish newspapers: brash Sabah, circulation 700,000 and rising; and Cumhuriyet, the country's oldest national quality daily, which is kept alive by little more than the support of its small (about 50,000 copies sold) but near-fanatical body of readers.
NEWS
July 20, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost 26 years ago, the young nation of Malaysia was gravely shaken when the tiny state of Singapore left a fledgling federation and went out to survive on its own. Singapore, of course, went on to become one of the great success stories of Asia, leaving Malaysia in its economic wake. But the idea of secession has left a bitter taste in the mouths of many Malaysian political leaders.
NEWS
May 27, 1985 | Associated Press
Security forces rounded up suspects across this tiny Persian Gulf emirate Sunday, one day after a suicide car-bomb driver failed in his attempt to kill the ruler of Kuwait. Sheik Jabber al Ahmed al Sabah resumed his regular duties Sunday and met with leaders of other oil-producing gulf countries, who rallied around the Arab monarch. The 58-year-old emir suffered minor injuries; the terrorist and three other people perished in the explosion.
NEWS
February 3, 2001 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The 30,000 square feet of leading-edge computer technology on display featured Gateway's cow booth, Palm Pilot's "cool, capable, connected" exhibit, a dizzying array of Compaqs, Packard Bells and Acers, and even the Koran on CD-ROM in six languages. But in a hall filled this week with Arab rock music, giant Showtime screens and well-heeled consumers, Kuwait's two privately owned Internet service providers were among the biggest draws here at the Info-Connect 2001 Expo.
NEWS
April 21, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crown Prince Sheik Saad al Abdullah al Sabah maintained the ruling family's grip on power Saturday, naming a new Cabinet that includes Sabahs in all of the most powerful positions and cuts out the democratic opposition, which refused to join the new Kuwaiti government.
NEWS
August 15, 1990 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. government is freeing frozen Kuwaiti assets to allow the country's government-in-exile to pay for official expenses and, almost certainly, to reimburse Turkey for the heavy economic losses expected from that nation's trade embargo against Iraq. "We have already freed up the money for them to do their own government business," said Barbara Clay, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Treasury Department. The Treasury is in charge of enforcing the freeze on Kuwaiti assets in the United States.
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