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Sabbath

ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2010 | By David Mermelstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
At a time when the relationship between African Americans and American Jews seems largely irrelevant to the national conversation, the Idelsohn Society for Musical Preservation is directing its gaze back at a different era. Not the early 1990s, when tensions between the two communities exploded into riots in Brooklyn's Crown Heights, but to the days more than 30 years prior, when blacks and Jews reached across the divide to embrace commonalities....
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WORLD
August 9, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
The view from Jerusalem's hilltop Abu Tor neighborhood is pretty good. Too good, some might say. From my apartment terrace, I can glimpse the major tourist sites: Old City walls, the golden Dome of the Rock and Temple Mount, the King David Hotel and Mt. Zion, believed to be the location of the Last Supper. But when clashes erupt between Israeli police and Palestinian demonstrators, I can also watch tear-gas clouds rise from the Arab village of Silwan below. And every morning, the sun rises over a massive concrete wall, part of Israel's West Bank security barrier.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 2010 | By Keith Thursby, Los Angeles Times
Ronnie James Dio, a legendary heavy metal singer who replaced Ozzy Osbourne in Black Sabbath and also was lead singer for the bands Rainbow and Dio, has died. He was 67. Dio died Sunday, according to a statement on his website by Wendy Dio, his wife and manager. Maureen O'Connor, a Los Angeles publicist, said Dio died in Los Angeles. No cause was given, but Dio had said last summer that he was suffering from stomach cancer. "Today my heart is broken," Wendy Dio wrote. "Many, many friends and family were able to say their private goodbyes before he peacefully passed away."
OPINION
May 8, 2010
The Times reports on the proposal to facilitate the building of a new museum on Grand Avenue by Eli Broad. We at the Music Center, Los Angeles Philharmonic and LA Opera support this project enthusiastically. In 1964, a downtown renaissance was set in motion by the creation of the Music Center. In the 1980s, MOCA planted its flag; then came the Cathedral, the Colburn School, the Walt Disney Concert Hall and a fabulous new arts high school. The commercial developments along Grand Avenue were inspired by the presence of world-class art and architecture — and the millions of visitors and international attention that they attracted.
OPINION
May 8, 2010
Backing for Broad Re "Museum plan is in eye of the beholder," April 30 With the local economy locked in the grip of a deep recession, it is unfortunate that some find fault in Eli Broad's generous offer to pay for the construction of a world-class museum, donate a 2,000-piece art collection and fund its endowment for a cool $200 million. What's not to like? Broad's long-standing commitment to Los Angeles' cultural assets have secured L.A.'s enviable position on the world's cultural map. Investing in the city's core improves the entire Los Angeles County economy because tourism is our No. 1 industry.
OPINION
May 2, 2010 | Judith Shulevitz
How many times have you vowed to build more downtime into your weekend schedule? How often have you done it? So many things get in the way -- deadlines, e-mails, children, chores. And although we long for unstructured time, in some other part of ourselves, we're also proud of how much we work and revel in our inability to stop doing so. The question of whether to rest or not on the weekend didn't use to be so tortured. Only during the past half a century did Americans become free to disregard the ancient commandment not to work one day a week.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2010 | By David L. Ulin
The Sabbath World Glimpses of a Different Order of Time Judith Shulevitz Random House: 250 pp., $26 In the mid-1990s, when my wife and I were first considering observing Shabbat, a friend told me that you had three chances to make it right with God. Celebrate Shabbat once, he said, and it was a tryout; you could always walk away. Celebrate a second time, and you were bound a little closer, but there was still an escape clause, a spiritual get-out-of-jail-free card.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009
Rebecca Skloot author When Rebecca Skloot was a high school student, she learned about HeLa cells, the first human cells to be successfully reproduced in a lab. They'd become the standard for medical research, classrooms, even in space -- and they came from somewhere. Rather, from someone: Henrietta Lacks, a poor African American mother of four, or more accurately from the cancer that took her life. The story stuck with Skloot -- who grew up to be a science journalist -- and now centers her February book "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" (Crown: 368 pp., $26)
WORLD
June 28, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Police turned water cannons on a raucous demonstration by ultra-Orthodox Jews, as they protested a second consecutive day over the opening of a city parking lot on the Jewish Sabbath when observant Jews are forbidden to drive. Thousands of ultra-Orthodox protesters were on the streets throughout the city, Jerusalem police spokesman Shmuel Ben-Ruby said. Police said 24 people had been arrested and a 6-year-old boy slightly hurt by a stone thrown by protesters. Four officers were lightly injured as well.
WORLD
September 13, 2008 | Tina Susman, Times Staff Writer
Two bombings, one of which killed as many as 32 people, tore through crowds Friday north of the capital, where Iraqi and U.S. officials say the insurgent threat is the most severe. Both attacks targeted Shiite Muslims and appeared to be the work of Sunni Arab insurgents. They struck on the Muslim sabbath, when people tend to let their guard down. The worse attack came in Dujayl, about 40 miles north of Baghdad, shortly before sunset, when the streets were crowded with people shopping for the breaking of the fast, which Muslims are observing from dawn to sunset during the month of Ramadan.
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