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Saber Toothed Cat

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NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
The Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits is now home to a "ferocious" saber-toothed-cat puppet featured in a performance titled "Ice Age Encounters. " On Wednesday the life-sized animatronic puppet will be "prowling" Miracle Mile, and to celebrate, the museum has commissioned free Coolhaus "saber-toothed cat" ice cream sandwiches (snickerdoodle ice cream with red velvet cookies). It's "the Ice Age plus ice cream," get it? From 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. catch the saber-toothed cat and Coolhaus on the northwest corner of Wilshire Boulevard and Curson Avenue.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
The Page Museum at the La Brea Tar Pits is now home to a "ferocious" saber-toothed-cat puppet featured in a performance titled "Ice Age Encounters. " On Wednesday the life-sized animatronic puppet will be "prowling" Miracle Mile, and to celebrate, the museum has commissioned free Coolhaus "saber-toothed cat" ice cream sandwiches (snickerdoodle ice cream with red velvet cookies). It's "the Ice Age plus ice cream," get it? From 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. catch the saber-toothed cat and Coolhaus on the northwest corner of Wilshire Boulevard and Curson Avenue.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
In the annals of odd jobs, this recent listing ranks high. "The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County seeks . . . a full-suit puppeteer for a saber-toothed cat. " "Extremely hot, claustrophobic full-suit puppet with limited sight range. … ," it went on. "Must carry 73 pounds on back in a crawling position, supported by arm stilts for periods of 20 minutes, multiple times a day. " More than 100 people sent in resumes for the chance to face these tough working conditions in a new museum show, "Ice Age Encounters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
California has a state bird, a state flower and even a state fossil — the saber-toothed cat. Joining the bunch could be an official state marine reptile. A bill introduced last week by Assemblyman Paul Fong (D-Cupertino) would name the endangered Pacific leatherback sea turtle to a growing list of symbols that includes the California quail, the gray whale, the California poppy and the garibaldi — the state marine fish. The leatherback, the world's largest sea turtle, would claim an entry in the law books right below — and not to be confused with — its relative the desert tortoise, a landlubber that has held the title of state reptile since 1972.
SCIENCE
September 21, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
It happened more than a million years ago, but the fossilized evidence preserved the scene. A horse not much different from modern horses was enjoying a cool drink at a watering hole in what is now San Timoteo Canyon when a saber-toothed cat sneaked up and grabbed it by the haunch. After finishing its meal, the cat left the skeleton to be buried in mud from flash floods. That cat, or one very like it, eventually also ended up dead and its skeleton joined the horse's in the accumulating sediment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1992 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fourteen thousand years ago, a saber-toothed cat got stuck in the treacherous asphalt of the La Brea Tar Pits. Now, for the first time, scientists have succeeded in stripping away the asphalt and reading some of the genetic information hidden in the marrow of its fossilized bones.
SCIENCE
August 23, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An ancient tar pit exposed when Venezuelan oil workers laid a pipeline has yielded a rich trove of fossils, including a type of saber-toothed cat that paleontologists had never before been found in South America. The fossils are 1.8 million years old and include the skulls and jawbones of six scimitar-toothed cats -- a variety of saber-toothed cat with shorter, narrower canine teeth than other species. Researchers led by Venezuelan paleontologist Ascanio Rincon announced the discovery this month, saying that in addition to proving the cat once lived there, the find also should offer a rare window into the environment shortly after North and South America became connected.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1996
How is this for a battle: a saber-toothed cat versus a lion the size of a Siberian tiger. The fight may have actually taken place 30,000 years ago near Wilshire Boulevard and Curson Avenue in the Wilshire district. Paleontologists have been making discoveries at the La Brea Tar Pits recently that lend credence to the thought that the ferocious fight may have occurred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Muscles flexed and fangs flashing, the tiger glided silently through throngs of startled visitors at the busy Beverly Center mall the other night. Until shopper Laura Morgan took aim and stopped it in its tracks. "It's a beautiful animal," Morgan said, shooting a disdainful look at animal owner Corey McFarland. "But why did he have to be killed? He should never have been stuffed." McFarland grinned at the criticism--big game hunters laugh at danger, after all. But McFarland is no hunter.
NEWS
June 11, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Scientists at the La Brea tar pits are studying the illnesses and injuries that plagued a creature extinct for at least 10,000 years. Staff and volunteer paleopathologists at the George C. Page Museum are cataloguing the ills that the saber-toothed cat fell prey to. Knowing what went wrong with the long-vanished cats, incorrectly called tigers by earlier researchers, has no obvious utility. But it provides intriguing clues to how they lived in sickness and in health. The Page Museum in Hancock Park houses the fossils of countless animals and plants that were trapped in the area's tar pits, vast deposits of asphalt that continues to seep to the surface and scent the park.
SCIENCE
September 21, 2010 | By Thomas H. Maugh II and Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
It happened more than a million years ago, but the fossilized evidence preserved the scene. A horse not much different from modern horses was enjoying a cool drink at a watering hole in what is now San Timoteo Canyon when a saber-toothed cat sneaked up and grabbed it by the haunch. After finishing its meal, the cat left the skeleton to be buried in mud from flash floods. That cat, or one very like it, eventually also ended up dead and its skeleton joined the horse's in the accumulating sediment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2010 | By Kate Linthicum, Los Angeles Times
In the annals of odd jobs, this recent listing ranks high. "The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County seeks . . . a full-suit puppeteer for a saber-toothed cat. " "Extremely hot, claustrophobic full-suit puppet with limited sight range. … ," it went on. "Must carry 73 pounds on back in a crawling position, supported by arm stilts for periods of 20 minutes, multiple times a day. " More than 100 people sent in resumes for the chance to face these tough working conditions in a new museum show, "Ice Age Encounters.
SCIENCE
August 23, 2008 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
An ancient tar pit exposed when Venezuelan oil workers laid a pipeline has yielded a rich trove of fossils, including a type of saber-toothed cat that paleontologists had never before been found in South America. The fossils are 1.8 million years old and include the skulls and jawbones of six scimitar-toothed cats -- a variety of saber-toothed cat with shorter, narrower canine teeth than other species. Researchers led by Venezuelan paleontologist Ascanio Rincon announced the discovery this month, saying that in addition to proving the cat once lived there, the find also should offer a rare window into the environment shortly after North and South America became connected.
OPINION
May 12, 2004
Re "Auction of Fossil Is Bone of Contention," May 1: Of course the find and auction of this wonderful fossil is a bone of contention to those in the academic community. That is because they are not in possession of it. They are like small children who want to claim "dibs" on everything in the neighborhood and then sit back and wait for others to do the work for them. You go, [auctioneer] David Herskowitz! I wish I had a big pile of money to buy the saber-toothed cat skull myself. It's called free enterprise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1996
How is this for a battle: a saber-toothed cat versus a lion the size of a Siberian tiger. The fight may have actually taken place 30,000 years ago near Wilshire Boulevard and Curson Avenue in the Wilshire district. Paleontologists have been making discoveries at the La Brea Tar Pits recently that lend credence to the thought that the ferocious fight may have occurred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1993 | ROBERT LEE HOTZ, TIMES SCIENCE WRITER
Despite the rich abundance of animal life in California 30,000 years ago, a predator's life on Wilshire Boulevard apparently was no picnic. Pickings were so lean in prehistoric Los Angeles that the lions, saber-toothed cats and dire wolves who formed the local lunch rush in the eons before fast-food fajitas and buffalo wings literally broke their teeth in the fierce scramble for the catch of the day, a new study by two UCLA researchers shows.
OPINION
May 12, 2004
Re "Auction of Fossil Is Bone of Contention," May 1: Of course the find and auction of this wonderful fossil is a bone of contention to those in the academic community. That is because they are not in possession of it. They are like small children who want to claim "dibs" on everything in the neighborhood and then sit back and wait for others to do the work for them. You go, [auctioneer] David Herskowitz! I wish I had a big pile of money to buy the saber-toothed cat skull myself. It's called free enterprise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1992 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fourteen thousand years ago, a saber-toothed cat got stuck in the treacherous asphalt of the La Brea Tar Pits. Now, for the first time, scientists have succeeded in stripping away the asphalt and reading some of the genetic information hidden in the marrow of its fossilized bones.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1991 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Muscles flexed and fangs flashing, the tiger glided silently through throngs of startled visitors at the busy Beverly Center mall the other night. Until shopper Laura Morgan took aim and stopped it in its tracks. "It's a beautiful animal," Morgan said, shooting a disdainful look at animal owner Corey McFarland. "But why did he have to be killed? He should never have been stuffed." McFarland grinned at the criticism--big game hunters laugh at danger, after all. But McFarland is no hunter.
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